Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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nprglobalhealth:

UNICEF Report On Female Genital Mutilation Holds Hope And Woe
Women and girls are less likely to undergo female genital mutilation, or FGM, than 30 years ago. That’s the encouraging news from a UNICEF report on the controversial practice, presented this week at London’s first Girl Summit.
The rate has dropped in many of the 29 countries across Africa and the Middle East where FGM is practiced. In Kenya, for example, nearly half the girls age 15 to 19 were circumcised in 1980; in 2010 the rate was just under 20 percent.
But there’s a sobering side to the report. In countries like Somalia the rate has gone down slightly but is still over 90 percent.
And because the population is growing in parts of the world where the practice takes place, total numbers are on the rise. Unless the rate of decline picks up, another 63 million girls and women could be cut by 2050.
The report is “exciting and worrying,” says Susan Bissell, the chief of child protection at UNICEF. “The population growth will far surpass the gain we’ve been seeing if we don’t step it up.”
The report shows that more than 130 million girls and women have experienced some form of genital cutting or mutilation in 29 countries across Africa and the Middle East.
The practice involves removing, partially or completely, the female genitalia — sometimes just the clitoris, other times also the labia or “lips” that surround the vagina. In extreme cases, the vaginal opening is narrowed by sewing up the outer labia.
In many communities, the custom has long been perceived as a rite of passage into womanhood. Because sexual contact is painful, the practice is also seen as a way to prevent a woman from losing her virginity before marriage. Some see it as ensuring fidelity during marriage, as the procedure eliminates sexual pleasure.
Continue reading.
Graph: This chart tracks the changing rates of female genital mutilation in a sampling of countries — and projects the rate needed to end FGM by 2030. (via UNICEF)

nprglobalhealth:

UNICEF Report On Female Genital Mutilation Holds Hope And Woe

Women and girls are less likely to undergo female genital mutilation, or FGM, than 30 years ago. That’s the encouraging news from a UNICEF report on the controversial practice, presented this week at London’s first Girl Summit.

The rate has dropped in many of the 29 countries across Africa and the Middle East where FGM is practiced. In Kenya, for example, nearly half the girls age 15 to 19 were circumcised in 1980; in 2010 the rate was just under 20 percent.

But there’s a sobering side to the report. In countries like Somalia the rate has gone down slightly but is still over 90 percent.

And because the population is growing in parts of the world where the practice takes place, total numbers are on the rise. Unless the rate of decline picks up, another 63 million girls and women could be cut by 2050.

The report is “exciting and worrying,” says Susan Bissell, the chief of child protection at UNICEF. “The population growth will far surpass the gain we’ve been seeing if we don’t step it up.”

The report shows that more than 130 million girls and women have experienced some form of genital cutting or mutilation in 29 countries across Africa and the Middle East.

The practice involves removing, partially or completely, the female genitalia — sometimes just the clitoris, other times also the labia or “lips” that surround the vagina. In extreme cases, the vaginal opening is narrowed by sewing up the outer labia.

In many communities, the custom has long been perceived as a rite of passage into womanhood. Because sexual contact is painful, the practice is also seen as a way to prevent a woman from losing her virginity before marriage. Some see it as ensuring fidelity during marriage, as the procedure eliminates sexual pleasure.

Continue reading.

Graph: This chart tracks the changing rates of female genital mutilation in a sampling of countries — and projects the rate needed to end FGM by 2030. (via UNICEF)

unicef:

“I told my parents I would not get married now; I am too young for that. I would not be able to continue my study if I get married.” 

Kalpona was 12 when her parents arranged for her to marry a man more than twice her age. A few days before the wedding, they agreed to let her continue with school instead.

In Bangladesh, 65% of girls are married as children. Pledge your support for ending child marriage within a generation:http://uni.cf/GS14

unicef:

“I told my parents I would not get married now; I am too young for that. I would not be able to continue my study if I get married.”

Kalpona was 12 when her parents arranged for her to marry a man more than twice her age. A few days before the wedding, they agreed to let her continue with school instead.

In Bangladesh, 65% of girls are married as children. Pledge your support for ending child marriage within a generation:http://uni.cf/GS14

Supreme Court Rejects Contraceptives Mandate for Some Corporations
Justices Rule in Favor of Hobby Lobby
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court ruled on Monday that requiring family-owned corporations to pay for insurance coverage for contraception under the Affordable Care Act violated a federal law protecting religious freedom. It was, the dissent said, “a decision of startling breadth.”
The 5-to-4 ruling, which applied to two companies owned by Christian families, opened the door to challenges from other corporations over laws that they claim violate their religious liberty.
The decision, along with another closely divided one that dealt a blow to public-sector unions, ended the term with a bang. But the rulings could have had an even broader immediate impact.
Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., writing for the court’s five more conservative justices, said a federal religious-freedom law applied to “closely held” for-profit corporations run on religious principles.
(From The New York Times)

Supreme Court Rejects Contraceptives Mandate for Some Corporations

Justices Rule in Favor of Hobby Lobby

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court ruled on Monday that requiring family-owned corporations to pay for insurance coverage for contraception under the Affordable Care Act violated a federal law protecting religious freedom. It was, the dissent said, “a decision of startling breadth.”

The 5-to-4 ruling, which applied to two companies owned by Christian families, opened the door to challenges from other corporations over laws that they claim violate their religious liberty.

The decision, along with another closely divided one that dealt a blow to public-sector unions, ended the term with a bang. But the rulings could have had an even broader immediate impact.

Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., writing for the court’s five more conservative justices, said a federal religious-freedom law applied to “closely held” for-profit corporations run on religious principles.

(From The New York Times)

plannedparenthood:

ppaction:

What you need to know about the Supreme Court birth control cases - in less than 2 minutes.

Check out this video about the health and economic benefits of birth control and learn about what’s at stake at the Supreme Court tomorrow. 

plannedparenthood:

source

gov-info:

UN Doc: Handbook for International and Regional Legislation on Violence against Women

The Handbook (and supplement) serves as a useful tool in supporting efforts to provide justice, support, protection and remedies to victims and to hold perpetrators accountable.
The Handbook first outlines the international and regional legal and policy frameworks which mandate States to enact and implement comprehensive and effective laws to address violence against women. It then presents a model framework for legislation on violence against women, divided into fourteen chapters. Finally, the Handbook provides users with a checklist of considerations to be kept in mind when drafting legislation on violence against women.
This Handbook intends to provide all stakeholders with detailed guidance to support the adoption and effective implementation of legislation which prevents violence against women, punishes perpetrators, and ensures the rights of survivors everywhere.

gov-info:

UN Doc: Handbook for International and Regional Legislation on Violence against Women

The Handbook (and supplement) serves as a useful tool in supporting efforts to provide justice, support, protection and remedies to victims and to hold perpetrators accountable.

The Handbook first outlines the international and regional legal and policy frameworks which mandate States to enact and implement comprehensive and effective laws to address violence against women. It then presents a model framework for legislation on violence against women, divided into fourteen chapters. Finally, the Handbook provides users with a checklist of considerations to be kept in mind when drafting legislation on violence against women.

This Handbook intends to provide all stakeholders with detailed guidance to support the adoption and effective implementation of legislation which prevents violence against women, punishes perpetrators, and ensures the rights of survivors everywhere.

ppaction:

41 years after Roe v. Wade, it’s as critical as ever for abortion to be safe, legal, and accessible. That’s why we’re committed to keeping it that way. Via Guttmacher Institute.

ppaction:

41 years after Roe v. Wade, it’s as critical as ever for abortion to be safe, legal, and accessible. That’s why we’re committed to keeping it that way. Via Guttmacher Institute.

unicef:

"I wasn’t scared until they blindfolded me." Fatou, 12, describes how she underwent female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) in Guinea where an estimated 96% of females aged 15-49 have been victims of this damaging, sometimes deadly practice.
Read Fatou’s story: http://uni.cf/1jKomF8

unicef:

"I wasn’t scared until they blindfolded me." Fatou, 12, describes how she underwent female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) in Guinea where an estimated 96% of females aged 15-49 have been victims of this damaging, sometimes deadly practice.

Read Fatou’s story: http://uni.cf/1jKomF8

mapsontheweb:

Paid maternity leave by country

mapsontheweb:

Paid maternity leave by country