Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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The Changing Landscape of Youth Tobacco Use
(From Food and Drug Administration, FDA)

The Changing Landscape of Youth Tobacco Use

(From Food and Drug Administration, FDA)

(Image from Hopkins Kicks Butts (HKB), JHU’s Anti-Tobacco Coalition.)
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Launches Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative
The initiative forbids all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes
The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is now a tobacco-free campus.
In launching the Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative, the School prohibits the use of any tobacco product – not just cigarettes – in all buildings, facilities and vehicles. The initiative also forbids e-cigarettes and discourages the use of tobacco products on all outdoor campus grounds.
“As a school of public health we are dedicated to promoting the well-being of the global community,” says Michael J. Klag, MD, MPH, dean of the School.  “With the Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative, we are taking steps to also promote our own health as well.”
Tobacco is the leading cause of preventable deaths, responsible for about one in five deaths annually in the U.S. – more than HIV, illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle injury, suicide and murder combined. It is estimated that six million youth alive today will eventually die prematurely from smoking.
Deterring the use of tobacco in all forms is crucial to protect the health of the students and workforce of the JHSPH community, initiative organizers say. By keeping out all tobacco products, the initiative ensures that the School doesn’t unintentionally encourage or reinforce tobacco addiction among students, faculty and staff.
As part of the initiative, the School will promote the use of smoking cessation services and resources; such services are included as part of student and employee health insurance plans.
(From Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health News)

(Image from Hopkins Kicks Butts (HKB), JHU’s Anti-Tobacco Coalition.)

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Launches Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative

The initiative forbids all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is now a tobacco-free campus.

In launching the Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative, the School prohibits the use of any tobacco product – not just cigarettes – in all buildings, facilities and vehicles. The initiative also forbids e-cigarettes and discourages the use of tobacco products on all outdoor campus grounds.

“As a school of public health we are dedicated to promoting the well-being of the global community,” says Michael J. Klag, MD, MPH, dean of the School.  “With the Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative, we are taking steps to also promote our own health as well.”

Tobacco is the leading cause of preventable deaths, responsible for about one in five deaths annually in the U.S. – more than HIV, illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle injury, suicide and murder combined. It is estimated that six million youth alive today will eventually die prematurely from smoking.

Deterring the use of tobacco in all forms is crucial to protect the health of the students and workforce of the JHSPH community, initiative organizers say. By keeping out all tobacco products, the initiative ensures that the School doesn’t unintentionally encourage or reinforce tobacco addiction among students, faculty and staff.

As part of the initiative, the School will promote the use of smoking cessation services and resources; such services are included as part of student and employee health insurance plans.

(From Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health News)

(From CDC)
postgraphics:

Tobacco smoking in the U.S.
Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.

postgraphics:

Tobacco smoking in the U.S.

Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.


What happens when a smoker quits

What happens when a smoker quits


Stop Smoking
Start Repairing

Stop Smoking

Start Repairing

Public Health England stop smoking health harms ‘Toxic cycle’ ad

businessweek:

Smoking from a hookah carries many of the same risks as cigarettes, and the practice is gaining traction with teens.

businessweek:

Smoking from a hookah carries many of the same risks as cigarettes, and the practice is gaining traction with teens.

What is secondhand smoke?
Secondhand smoke is the combination of smoke from the burning end of a cigarette and the smoke exhaled by smokers. You can be exposed to secondhand smoke in homes, cars, the workplace, and public places, such as bars, restaurants, and recreational settings.
In the United States, the source of most secondhand smoke is cigarettes, followed by pipes, cigars, and other tobacco products. Secondhand smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals. Hundreds of the chemicals are toxic and about 70 are known to cause cancer,
(From CDC)

What is secondhand smoke?

Secondhand smoke is the combination of smoke from the burning end of a cigarette and the smoke exhaled by smokers. You can be exposed to secondhand smoke in homes, cars, the workplace, and public places, such as bars, restaurants, and recreational settings.

In the United States, the source of most secondhand smoke is cigarettes, followed by pipes, cigars, and other tobacco products. Secondhand smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals. Hundreds of the chemicals are toxic and about 70 are known to cause cancer,

(From CDC)

The Study That Helped Spur the U.S. Stop-Smoking Movement

By Elizabeth Mendes

Most Americans born into the generations that came after the Baby Boom have gone their entire lives aware that smoking can cause lung cancer. But this fact has not always been well-known – and at one time it wasn’t known at all.

Actually, it wasn’t even until cigarettes were mass produced and popularized by manufacturers in the first part of the 20th century that there was cause for alarm. Prior to the 1900s, lung cancer was a rare disease. Turn-of-the-century changes though, gave way to an era of rapidly increasing lung cancer rates. New technology allowed cigarettes to be produced on a large scale, and advertising glamorized smoking. The military got in on it too – giving cigarettes out for free to soldiers during World Wars I and II.

Cigarette smoking increased rapidly through the 1950s, becoming much more widespread. Per capita cigarette consumption soared from 54 per year in 1900, to 4,345 per year in 1963. And, lung cancer went from rarity to more commonplace – by the early 1950s it became “the most common cancer diagnosed in American men,” writes American Cancer Society Chief Medical Officer Otis Brawley, M.D., in an article published November 2013 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

However, though tobacco usage and lung cancer rates increased in tandem, few experts suspected a connection, according to Brawley and his co-authors.

(More ……)
From American Cancer Society