nychealth

nychealth:

Today NYC Health kicks off its 9th annual nicotine patch and gum program to help New Yorkers quit smoking. The program, in partnership with the New York State Smokers’ Quitline, will run through April 1st. Since the nicotine patch and gum program began in 2006, it has helped almost 300,000 adult New Yorkers quit smoking and contributed to the city’s multi-pronged effort to reduce the prevalence of adult smoking to 15.5% and youth smoking to 8.5%.

To coincide with the patch and gum giveaway, we will run a series of powerful ads on television featuring Marie, a New Yorker who began smoking in high school.  In her early forties, Marie was diagnosed with a disease caused by smoking that, over time, has led to amputations of her foot, leg, and some fingers.  She has been smoke-free since 2006 when she called 311 for help to quit, and has become a national spokesperson for quitting smoking.

Live longer, enjoy a healthier life and become one of the many New Yorkers who have quit smoking:

  • Apply for your free gum patches and/or  gum online by 4/1: bit.ly/NycgpK
  • Watch the videos to find out more about Marie’s story here, here and here.
  • Find out more about the free quit smoking program: on.nyc.gov/1q18Fza
  • Contact the New York State Smokers’ Quitline by calling 1-866-NY-QUITS.
  • Join us on Facebook by visiting Facebook.com/NYCQuits
ottawahealth

ottawahealth:

image

It probably started off all hot and heavy, seeing each other occasionally, a lot of sneaking around, the excitement of when your lips first touched. Now, you want time apart and you’re sick of how it makes you feel.

Just like a bad relationship, you’re done with smoking and are ready to…

Since the release of the first Surgeon General’s Report on smoking and health in 1964, smoking rates in the United States have dropped by more than half. Eight million lives have been saved by tobacco control efforts — yet up to 20 million more have been lost. Explore milestones in tobacco control, and find out what we can do together to make tobacco history.
See this interactive history of half-century of tobacco control.
(From Robert Wood Johnson Foundation)

Since the release of the first Surgeon General’s Report on smoking and health in 1964, smoking rates in the United States have dropped by more than half. Eight million lives have been saved by tobacco control efforts — yet up to 20 million more have been lost. Explore milestones in tobacco control, and find out what we can do together to make tobacco history.

See this interactive history of half-century of tobacco control.

(From Robert Wood Johnson Foundation)

The Real Cost Commercial: “Your Teeth”

Everybody knows cigarettes are expensive. What this video shows you is that the cost of smoking doesn’t just come out of your wallet … It can literally also come out of your mouth—in ways you really wouldn’t enjoy. Are you willing to pay the real cost?

(From US Food and Drug Administration)

By Dropping Cigarettes, CVS Gives Its Reputation A Boost
When drugstore chain CVS said Wednesday that it would stop selling tobacco products by October, the company also told investors that the move would probably cost it $2 billion a year in lost sales.
CVS says it has figured out unspecified ways to help make up for the profits from cigarettes and other tobacco products.
Still, it’s pretty clear that CVS, which also runs a network of and provides drug benefit services to corporations, has already burnished its image by making the high-profile decision.
While the value to the company’s image is hard to measure, there’s little doubt that it’s big. “They’ll end up getting more than $2 billion in reputational capital and kudos,” Dartmouth professor Paul Argenti tells Shots. “How often is the president of the U.S. going to come out and say your company is great?” says Argenti, referring to President Obama’s .
CVS is one of a small, but growing number of companies that have realized “your reputation is the most valuable asset you have,” says , who studies corporate communications at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business.
Measuring that value is difficult, he says, but a strong reputation can create a business advantage. He expects CVS’s competitors will end up having to follow suit. “The better question is how quickly will others jump on the bandwagon,” he says.
"I hope this sends a message to health-care-related companies," says Mike Huckman, a former reporter for CNBC and now for Pure Communications. "It’s not enough to do PR campaign. You have to walk the walk and talk the talk."
Both Huckman and Argenti say they think CVS made the move mainly for public health reasons. Huckman says the step forward for health at a potential hit to profits shows that CVS is willing to stand up to Wall Street. “It’s a seminal moment for corporate America, for corporate responsibility,” he says.
CVS Caremark’s stock price was down 55 cents, or a little less than 1 percent, to $65.56 in midday trading.
Amid the feel-good coverage, one critic asked why more news outlets hadn’t previously reported on the conflict between CVS’s goals as a health care company and its sale of tobacco products.
The American Heart Association, American Cancer Society, American Lung Association and American Pharmacists Association have long been against sales of tobacco products in pharmacies, CVS acknowledged.
"[H]ow did newsroom after newsroom not go after such an obvious story before?" asks a by , a journalism professor at Kent State University. "Why weren’t reporters questioning an industry supposedly concerned with health about why they continued to sell death?"
(From Shots: Health News from NPR)
By Dropping Cigarettes, CVS Gives Its Reputation A Boost

When drugstore chain CVS said Wednesday that it would stop selling tobacco products by October, the company also told investors that the move would probably cost it $2 billion a year in lost sales.

CVS says it has figured out unspecified ways to help make up for the profits from cigarettes and other tobacco products.

Still, it’s pretty clear that CVS, which also runs a network of and provides drug benefit services to corporations, has already burnished its image by making the high-profile decision.

While the value to the company’s image is hard to measure, there’s little doubt that it’s big. “They’ll end up getting more than $2 billion in reputational capital and kudos,” Dartmouth professor Paul Argenti tells Shots. “How often is the president of the U.S. going to come out and say your company is great?” says Argenti, referring to President Obama’s .

CVS is one of a small, but growing number of companies that have realized “your reputation is the most valuable asset you have,” says , who studies corporate communications at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business.

Measuring that value is difficult, he says, but a strong reputation can create a business advantage. He expects CVS’s competitors will end up having to follow suit. “The better question is how quickly will others jump on the bandwagon,” he says.

"I hope this sends a message to health-care-related companies," says Mike Huckman, a former reporter for CNBC and now for Pure Communications. "It’s not enough to do PR campaign. You have to walk the walk and talk the talk."

Both Huckman and Argenti say they think CVS made the move mainly for public health reasons. Huckman says the step forward for health at a potential hit to profits shows that CVS is willing to stand up to Wall Street. “It’s a seminal moment for corporate America, for corporate responsibility,” he says.

CVS Caremark’s stock price was down 55 cents, or a little less than 1 percent, to $65.56 in midday trading.

Amid the feel-good coverage, one critic asked why more news outlets hadn’t previously reported on the conflict between CVS’s goals as a health care company and its sale of tobacco products.

The American Heart Association, American Cancer Society, American Lung Association and American Pharmacists Association have long been against sales of tobacco products in pharmacies, CVS acknowledged.

"[H]ow did newsroom after newsroom not go after such an obvious story before?" asks a by , a journalism professor at Kent State University. "Why weren’t reporters questioning an industry supposedly concerned with health about why they continued to sell death?"

(From Shots: Health News from NPR)