Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

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Things You Should Know About E-cigarette 

Things You Should Know About E-cigarette 

More than a quarter-million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used e-cigarettes in 2013
Study finds youth who have used e-cigarettes are almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes 
More than a quarter of a million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used electronic cigarettes in 2013, according to a CDC study published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research.  This number reflects a three-fold increase, from about 79,000 in 2011, to more than 263,000 in 2013.
The data, which comes from the 2011, 2012, and 2013 National Youth Tobacco surveys of middle and high school students, show that youth who had never smoked conventional cigarettes but who used e-cigarettes were almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes as those who had never used e-cigarettes.  Among non-smoking youth who had ever used e-cigarettes, 43.9 percent said they intended to smoke conventional cigarettes within the next year, compared with 21.5 percent of those who had never used e-cigarettes.
“We are very concerned about nicotine use among our youth, regardless of whether it comes from conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes or other tobacco products.  Not only is nicotine highly addictive, it can harm adolescent brain development.” said Tim McAfee, M.D., M.P.H., Director of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health.
There is evidence that nicotine’s adverse effects on adolescent brain development could result in lasting deficits in cognitive function.  Nicotine is highly addictive.  About three out of every four teen smokers become adult smokers, even if they intend to quit in a few years.
(More from CDC)

More than a quarter-million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used e-cigarettes in 2013

Study finds youth who have used e-cigarettes are almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes

More than a quarter of a million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used electronic cigarettes in 2013, according to a CDC study published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research.  This number reflects a three-fold increase, from about 79,000 in 2011, to more than 263,000 in 2013.

The data, which comes from the 2011, 2012, and 2013 National Youth Tobacco surveys of middle and high school students, show that youth who had never smoked conventional cigarettes but who used e-cigarettes were almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes as those who had never used e-cigarettes.  Among non-smoking youth who had ever used e-cigarettes, 43.9 percent said they intended to smoke conventional cigarettes within the next year, compared with 21.5 percent of those who had never used e-cigarettes.

“We are very concerned about nicotine use among our youth, regardless of whether it comes from conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes or other tobacco products.  Not only is nicotine highly addictive, it can harm adolescent brain development.” said Tim McAfee, M.D., M.P.H., Director of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health.

There is evidence that nicotine’s adverse effects on adolescent brain development could result in lasting deficits in cognitive function.  Nicotine is highly addictive.  About three out of every four teen smokers become adult smokers, even if they intend to quit in a few years.

(More from CDC)

npr:

Tobacco control advocates disagree on whether e-cigarettes are a useful tool to get smokers off tobacco, or just a sleeker form of one of the world’s deadliest addictions.
A lot of that discord comes from the fact that there’s just not enough science to know the risks and benefits of e-cigarettes, which deliver nicotine in a vapor rather than through tobacco smoke. And it could take years to find out if vaping causes cancer and other deadly diseases.
But that lack of certainty means that people need more protection, not less, according to a report released Tuesday by the World Health Organization. 
Health Organizations Call For A Ban On E-Cigarettes Indoors
Photo credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

npr:

Tobacco control advocates disagree on whether e-cigarettes are a useful tool to get smokers off tobacco, or just a sleeker form of one of the world’s deadliest addictions.

A lot of that discord comes from the fact that there’s just not enough science to know the risks and benefits of e-cigarettes, which deliver nicotine in a vapor rather than through tobacco smoke. And it could take years to find out if vaping causes cancer and other deadly diseases.

But that lack of certainty means that people need more protection, not less, according to a report released Tuesday by the World Health Organization. 

Health Organizations Call For A Ban On E-Cigarettes Indoors

Photo credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The Changing Landscape of Youth Tobacco Use
(From Food and Drug Administration, FDA)

The Changing Landscape of Youth Tobacco Use

(From Food and Drug Administration, FDA)

(Image from Hopkins Kicks Butts (HKB), JHU’s Anti-Tobacco Coalition.)
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Launches Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative
The initiative forbids all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes
The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is now a tobacco-free campus.
In launching the Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative, the School prohibits the use of any tobacco product – not just cigarettes – in all buildings, facilities and vehicles. The initiative also forbids e-cigarettes and discourages the use of tobacco products on all outdoor campus grounds.
“As a school of public health we are dedicated to promoting the well-being of the global community,” says Michael J. Klag, MD, MPH, dean of the School.  “With the Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative, we are taking steps to also promote our own health as well.”
Tobacco is the leading cause of preventable deaths, responsible for about one in five deaths annually in the U.S. – more than HIV, illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle injury, suicide and murder combined. It is estimated that six million youth alive today will eventually die prematurely from smoking.
Deterring the use of tobacco in all forms is crucial to protect the health of the students and workforce of the JHSPH community, initiative organizers say. By keeping out all tobacco products, the initiative ensures that the School doesn’t unintentionally encourage or reinforce tobacco addiction among students, faculty and staff.
As part of the initiative, the School will promote the use of smoking cessation services and resources; such services are included as part of student and employee health insurance plans.
(From Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health News)

(Image from Hopkins Kicks Butts (HKB), JHU’s Anti-Tobacco Coalition.)

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Launches Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative

The initiative forbids all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is now a tobacco-free campus.

In launching the Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative, the School prohibits the use of any tobacco product – not just cigarettes – in all buildings, facilities and vehicles. The initiative also forbids e-cigarettes and discourages the use of tobacco products on all outdoor campus grounds.

“As a school of public health we are dedicated to promoting the well-being of the global community,” says Michael J. Klag, MD, MPH, dean of the School.  “With the Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative, we are taking steps to also promote our own health as well.”

Tobacco is the leading cause of preventable deaths, responsible for about one in five deaths annually in the U.S. – more than HIV, illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle injury, suicide and murder combined. It is estimated that six million youth alive today will eventually die prematurely from smoking.

Deterring the use of tobacco in all forms is crucial to protect the health of the students and workforce of the JHSPH community, initiative organizers say. By keeping out all tobacco products, the initiative ensures that the School doesn’t unintentionally encourage or reinforce tobacco addiction among students, faculty and staff.

As part of the initiative, the School will promote the use of smoking cessation services and resources; such services are included as part of student and employee health insurance plans.

(From Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health News)

(From CDC)
postgraphics:

Tobacco smoking in the U.S.
Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.

postgraphics:

Tobacco smoking in the U.S.

Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.


What happens when a smoker quits

What happens when a smoker quits


Stop Smoking
Start Repairing

Stop Smoking

Start Repairing

Public Health England stop smoking health harms ‘Toxic cycle’ ad