Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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Tobacco smoking in the U.S.
Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.

postgraphics:

Tobacco smoking in the U.S.

Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.


What happens when a smoker quits

What happens when a smoker quits


Stop Smoking
Start Repairing

Stop Smoking

Start Repairing

Public Health England stop smoking health harms ‘Toxic cycle’ ad

businessweek:

Smoking from a hookah carries many of the same risks as cigarettes, and the practice is gaining traction with teens.

businessweek:

Smoking from a hookah carries many of the same risks as cigarettes, and the practice is gaining traction with teens.

What is secondhand smoke?
Secondhand smoke is the combination of smoke from the burning end of a cigarette and the smoke exhaled by smokers. You can be exposed to secondhand smoke in homes, cars, the workplace, and public places, such as bars, restaurants, and recreational settings.
In the United States, the source of most secondhand smoke is cigarettes, followed by pipes, cigars, and other tobacco products. Secondhand smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals. Hundreds of the chemicals are toxic and about 70 are known to cause cancer,
(From CDC)

What is secondhand smoke?

Secondhand smoke is the combination of smoke from the burning end of a cigarette and the smoke exhaled by smokers. You can be exposed to secondhand smoke in homes, cars, the workplace, and public places, such as bars, restaurants, and recreational settings.

In the United States, the source of most secondhand smoke is cigarettes, followed by pipes, cigars, and other tobacco products. Secondhand smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals. Hundreds of the chemicals are toxic and about 70 are known to cause cancer,

(From CDC)

The Study That Helped Spur the U.S. Stop-Smoking Movement

By Elizabeth Mendes

Most Americans born into the generations that came after the Baby Boom have gone their entire lives aware that smoking can cause lung cancer. But this fact has not always been well-known – and at one time it wasn’t known at all.

Actually, it wasn’t even until cigarettes were mass produced and popularized by manufacturers in the first part of the 20th century that there was cause for alarm. Prior to the 1900s, lung cancer was a rare disease. Turn-of-the-century changes though, gave way to an era of rapidly increasing lung cancer rates. New technology allowed cigarettes to be produced on a large scale, and advertising glamorized smoking. The military got in on it too – giving cigarettes out for free to soldiers during World Wars I and II.

Cigarette smoking increased rapidly through the 1950s, becoming much more widespread. Per capita cigarette consumption soared from 54 per year in 1900, to 4,345 per year in 1963. And, lung cancer went from rarity to more commonplace – by the early 1950s it became “the most common cancer diagnosed in American men,” writes American Cancer Society Chief Medical Officer Otis Brawley, M.D., in an article published November 2013 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

However, though tobacco usage and lung cancer rates increased in tandem, few experts suspected a connection, according to Brawley and his co-authors.

(More ……)
From American Cancer Society

umnsph:

University of Minnesota goes smoke & tobacco free as of today! #tobaccofree #umn #umnproud #minneapolis #pinwheel

Cigarette smoking among U.S. high school students at lowest level in 22 years
Latest CDC teen behavior survey also finds fewer fights, too much texting and driving
Cigarette smoking rates among high school students have dropped to the lowest levels since the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) began in 1991, according to the 2013 results released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
By achieving a teen smoking rate of 15.7 percent, the United States has met its national Healthy People 2020 objective of reducing adolescent cigarette use to 16 percent or less.
Despite this progress, reducing overall tobacco use remains a significant challenge. For example, other national surveys show increases in hookah and e-cigarette use. In the YRBS, no change in smokeless tobacco use was observed among adolescents since 1999, and the decline in cigar use has slowed in recent years, with cigar use now at 23 percent among male high school seniors.
“It’s encouraging that high school students are making better health choices such as not fighting, not smoking, and not having sex,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.  “Way too many young people still smoke and other areas such as texting while driving remain a challenge.  Our youth are our future.  We need to invest in programs that help them make healthy choices so they live long, healthy lives.”
(From CDC)
http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0612-YRBS.html

Cigarette smoking among U.S. high school students at lowest level in 22 years

Latest CDC teen behavior survey also finds fewer fights, too much texting and driving

Cigarette smoking rates among high school students have dropped to the lowest levels since the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) began in 1991, according to the 2013 results released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

By achieving a teen smoking rate of 15.7 percent, the United States has met its national Healthy People 2020External Web Site Icon objective of reducing adolescent cigarette use to 16 percent or less.

Despite this progress, reducing overall tobacco use remains a significant challenge. For example, other national surveys show increases in hookah and e-cigarette use. In the YRBS, no change in smokeless tobacco use was observed among adolescents since 1999, and the decline in cigar use has slowed in recent years, with cigar use now at 23 percent among male high school seniors.

“It’s encouraging that high school students are making better health choices such as not fighting, not smoking, and not having sex,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.  “Way too many young people still smoke and other areas such as texting while driving remain a challenge.  Our youth are our future.  We need to invest in programs that help them make healthy choices so they live long, healthy lives.”

(From CDC)

http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0612-YRBS.html

CDC: Tips From Former Smokers - Amanda’s Ad

Smoking while you’re pregnant can cause serious health problems for you and your baby. In this TV ad for CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Amanda talks about the time her baby spent in a hospital incubator. Amanda had tried to quit smoking, but she was unable to overcome her addiction to cigarettes. Her baby was born 2 months early, weighing only 3 pounds.

(From CDC)