Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget. Flash Player 9 is required.
Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget.
Flash Player 9 is required.

(From the FDA, Food and Drug Administration)

(From the FDA, Food and Drug Administration)

The Real Cost Commercial: “Bully”

Bullies, they like to tell you what to do. They don’t wait until you’re good and ready—it’s all about what they want and when they want it. Cigarettes are like bullies. Hit play and ask yourself, do you want tobacco to control you?

(From US Food and Drug Administration)


No smoker should have to quit alone. Share if you promise to be your loved one’s biggest fan, biggest supporter, and a shoulder to lean on during their quit journey.

No smoker should have to quit alone. Share if you promise to be your loved one’s biggest fan, biggest supporter, and a shoulder to lean on during their quit journey.

How Tobacco Bonds Work, and What Can Go Wrong

States and localities got cash up front but may end up paying back a lot more than they expected.

It all began when states settled their lawsuits against Big Tobacco.
After a long fight, states would finally get billions to cover the health costs of smoking, in perpetuity.
But some government officials wanted the money up front, to cover all sorts of budgetary needs. They said it would be better to get cash now in case tobacco companies couldn’t pay later on or if cigarette sales plummeted.
The answer: bonds. A bond is like a loan. Investors buy the bonds, providing states with cash. States repay the bondholders using the tobacco money. The typical bond lasts 30 years or less and pays interest every year.
If tobacco payments fall short, investors have no right – ‘no recourse’ – to be repaid with taxpayer money. But they retain rights to future tobacco payments. Because of the steep payments promised to some bondholders, that could take years or decades in which taxpayers lose out on the tobacco money.
In all, states, counties, cities, and territories sold some $36 billion in tobacco bonds that are still outstanding. Most had routine repayment terms. But to get extra cash up front, some sold capital appreciation bonds, or CABs which came with steeper repayments terms.
With CABs, no payments are required until they mature, often in 40 years or more. In the meantime, the interest compounds into a huge balance owed. In all, governments sold about $3 billion of CABs – for which they promised to repay $64 billion.
The deals assumed there would be enough settlement money available to pay off the CABs early. But people are smoking less. So tobacco payments to states are down, too — and that means they can’t repay the CABs early, if at all.
States can avoid defaulting on CABs — for a price. New Jersey recently pledged more of its tobacco money to avoid defaulting on $186 million of CABs on which it owed $1.3 billion in 2041.
By pledging another $406 million to investors — all of its remaining tobacco money from 2017 through 2023 — New Jersey will be able to repay its CABs early. The alternative – pay investors out of the tobacco money until the full debt was satisfied – would have meant paying an estimated $1.6 billion to the bondholders over many years. By putting more money into the pot now, the state also got investors to pony up an additional $92 million for this year’s budget.
(From ProPublica)

christinechronicles:

Cigarette health warnings in Peru

I saw these labels on cigarettes in Peru while traveling and thought man these pictures must deter people from smoking or make people think about quitting.

Apparently Philip Morris is now suing Uruguay for $25 million because of these ads. More on that story here.

New York City Health Department Data Show Increase in Adult Smoking Rate
For the first time since 2007, there are over one million smokers in New York City New “Imagine for Life” ad campaign encourages light daily smokers and non-daily smokers to quit.
September 15, 2014 – The Health Department today released new 2013 data showing 16.1 percent of adult New Yorkers are smokers, a significant increase from the city’s lowest recorded adult smoking rate of 14 percent in 2010. For the first time since 2007, there are over one million smokers in New York City who are at risk of developing a smoking-related illness, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, emphysema, lung and other cancers.
The Health Department also launched a new ad campaign today called “Imagine for Life” that focuses on the experience of light daily smokers and non-daily smokers (those smoking some days but not every day). Non-daily and light daily smokers now make up 76 percent of the New York City smoking population, compared with 64 percent in 2002. The new ads inform smokers that even the minimal health effects they feel after smoking, including a morning cough, are indications of their bodies’ negative reaction to smoking, and are just a preview of the daily suffering caused by smoking-related illness. The television ads will run for the next four weeks. Subway ads for this campaign will run during the month of October.
More…
(From New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)

New York City Health Department Data Show Increase in Adult Smoking Rate

For the first time since 2007, there are over one million smokers in New York City New “Imagine for Life” ad campaign encourages light daily smokers and non-daily smokers to quit.

September 15, 2014 – The Health Department today released new 2013 data showing 16.1 percent of adult New Yorkers are smokers, a significant increase from the city’s lowest recorded adult smoking rate of 14 percent in 2010. For the first time since 2007, there are over one million smokers in New York City who are at risk of developing a smoking-related illness, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, emphysema, lung and other cancers.

The Health Department also launched a new ad campaign today called “Imagine for Life” that focuses on the experience of light daily smokers and non-daily smokers (those smoking some days but not every day). Non-daily and light daily smokers now make up 76 percent of the New York City smoking population, compared with 64 percent in 2002. The new ads inform smokers that even the minimal health effects they feel after smoking, including a morning cough, are indications of their bodies’ negative reaction to smoking, and are just a preview of the daily suffering caused by smoking-related illness. The television ads will run for the next four weeks. Subway ads for this campaign will run during the month of October.

More…

(From New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)


Things You Should Know About E-cigarette 

Things You Should Know About E-cigarette 

More than a quarter-million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used e-cigarettes in 2013
Study finds youth who have used e-cigarettes are almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes 
More than a quarter of a million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used electronic cigarettes in 2013, according to a CDC study published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research.  This number reflects a three-fold increase, from about 79,000 in 2011, to more than 263,000 in 2013.
The data, which comes from the 2011, 2012, and 2013 National Youth Tobacco surveys of middle and high school students, show that youth who had never smoked conventional cigarettes but who used e-cigarettes were almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes as those who had never used e-cigarettes.  Among non-smoking youth who had ever used e-cigarettes, 43.9 percent said they intended to smoke conventional cigarettes within the next year, compared with 21.5 percent of those who had never used e-cigarettes.
“We are very concerned about nicotine use among our youth, regardless of whether it comes from conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes or other tobacco products.  Not only is nicotine highly addictive, it can harm adolescent brain development.” said Tim McAfee, M.D., M.P.H., Director of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health.
There is evidence that nicotine’s adverse effects on adolescent brain development could result in lasting deficits in cognitive function.  Nicotine is highly addictive.  About three out of every four teen smokers become adult smokers, even if they intend to quit in a few years.
(More from CDC)

More than a quarter-million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used e-cigarettes in 2013

Study finds youth who have used e-cigarettes are almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes

More than a quarter of a million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used electronic cigarettes in 2013, according to a CDC study published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research.  This number reflects a three-fold increase, from about 79,000 in 2011, to more than 263,000 in 2013.

The data, which comes from the 2011, 2012, and 2013 National Youth Tobacco surveys of middle and high school students, show that youth who had never smoked conventional cigarettes but who used e-cigarettes were almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes as those who had never used e-cigarettes.  Among non-smoking youth who had ever used e-cigarettes, 43.9 percent said they intended to smoke conventional cigarettes within the next year, compared with 21.5 percent of those who had never used e-cigarettes.

“We are very concerned about nicotine use among our youth, regardless of whether it comes from conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes or other tobacco products.  Not only is nicotine highly addictive, it can harm adolescent brain development.” said Tim McAfee, M.D., M.P.H., Director of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health.

There is evidence that nicotine’s adverse effects on adolescent brain development could result in lasting deficits in cognitive function.  Nicotine is highly addictive.  About three out of every four teen smokers become adult smokers, even if they intend to quit in a few years.

(More from CDC)

npr:

Tobacco control advocates disagree on whether e-cigarettes are a useful tool to get smokers off tobacco, or just a sleeker form of one of the world’s deadliest addictions.
A lot of that discord comes from the fact that there’s just not enough science to know the risks and benefits of e-cigarettes, which deliver nicotine in a vapor rather than through tobacco smoke. And it could take years to find out if vaping causes cancer and other deadly diseases.
But that lack of certainty means that people need more protection, not less, according to a report released Tuesday by the World Health Organization. 
Health Organizations Call For A Ban On E-Cigarettes Indoors
Photo credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

npr:

Tobacco control advocates disagree on whether e-cigarettes are a useful tool to get smokers off tobacco, or just a sleeker form of one of the world’s deadliest addictions.

A lot of that discord comes from the fact that there’s just not enough science to know the risks and benefits of e-cigarettes, which deliver nicotine in a vapor rather than through tobacco smoke. And it could take years to find out if vaping causes cancer and other deadly diseases.

But that lack of certainty means that people need more protection, not less, according to a report released Tuesday by the World Health Organization. 

Health Organizations Call For A Ban On E-Cigarettes Indoors

Photo credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The Changing Landscape of Youth Tobacco Use
(From Food and Drug Administration, FDA)

The Changing Landscape of Youth Tobacco Use

(From Food and Drug Administration, FDA)