Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget. Flash Player 9 is required.
Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget.
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From UK’s Office for National Statistics (Click on image for more resolution)

From UK’s Office for National Statistics (Click on image for more resolution)

allheartcare:

The Battle Against Tobacco Rages On

In 1964, the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health made it clear — smoking causes cancer. This news hit the country like a bombshell. At the time, more than 40 percent of American adults smoked, and smoking was widely accepted and considered normal behavior.

Today, 50 years later, we’ve cut the US smoking rate by more than half. Increasingly, effective tobacco control efforts have prevented at least eight million Americans from dying prematurely.
It’s a great public health success, one of the biggest of the 20th century.
But the battle against tobacco is far from over. At least 5.6 million kids alive today will die prematurely from smoking if current rates continue. This map shows how many will die in each state.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tom-frieden-md-mph/the-battle-against-tobacc_b_4597624.html

allheartcare:

The Battle Against Tobacco Rages On

In 1964, the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health made it clear — smoking causes cancer. This news hit the country like a bombshell. At the time, more than 40 percent of American adults smoked, and smoking was widely accepted and considered normal behavior.

Today, 50 years later, we’ve cut the US smoking rate by more than half. Increasingly, effective tobacco control efforts have prevented at least eight million Americans from dying prematurely.

It’s a great public health success, one of the biggest of the 20th century.

But the battle against tobacco is far from over. At least 5.6 million kids alive today will die prematurely from smoking if current rates continue. This map shows how many will die in each state.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tom-frieden-md-mph/the-battle-against-tobacc_b_4597624.html

Graphic Warnings Begin to Appear on Cigarette Packs in Costa Rica
Costa Rica has taken another important step to protect public health from the terrible toll of tobacco use

Costa Rica has taken another important step to protect public health from the terrible toll of tobacco use, which is the number one cause of preventable death worldwide.
Starting last week, pictorial warning labels are required on cigarette packs sold in Costa Rica.  The new warnings cover 50 percent of both the front and back of cigarette packs and feature gruesome images depicting the consequences of smoking, as well as text warnings.  Retailers and suppliers have a two-month grace period to sell their stock of old packs.
Costa Rica joins 13 other countries in Latin America – and at least 62 countries worldwide – in requiring graphic cigarette warnings.
These countries include Uruguay, which is currently fighting a lawsuit brought by tobacco giant Philip Morris International over its warnings and other tobacco control measures.  Increasingly, Philip Morris and other tobacco companies are challenging tobacco control measures as violations of trade and investment agreements as they seek to bully countries into adopting weak laws, or none at all. The case is currently being heard by an arbitration panel affiliated with the World Bank. 
Costa Rica’s new warnings come a little more than two years after the country passed comprehensive tobacco control legislation and six years after it signed the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, the world’s first public health treaty.  Along with the health warning requirement, the law prohibits smoking in public areas, increases tobacco taxes and severely restricts the advertising of tobacco products.
Tobacco kills about six million people worldwide each year and is projected to kill one billion people this century unless countries take strong action to prevent it.  By enacting the graphic health warnings and other effective measures, Costa Rica has joined a movement sweeping across Latin America aimed at curbing tobacco use and saving lives.
(From TobaccoFreeKids.org)

Graphic Warnings Begin to Appear on Cigarette Packs in Costa Rica

Costa Rica has taken another important step to protect public health from the terrible toll of tobacco use

Costa Rica has taken another important step to protect public health from the terrible toll of tobacco use, which is the number one cause of preventable death worldwide.

Starting last week, pictorial warning labels are required on cigarette packs sold in Costa Rica.  The new warnings cover 50 percent of both the front and back of cigarette packs and feature gruesome images depicting the consequences of smoking, as well as text warnings.  Retailers and suppliers have a two-month grace period to sell their stock of old packs.

Costa Rica joins 13 other countries in Latin America – and at least 62 countries worldwide – in requiring graphic cigarette warnings.

These countries include Uruguay, which is currently fighting a lawsuit brought by tobacco giant Philip Morris International over its warnings and other tobacco control measures.  Increasingly, Philip Morris and other tobacco companies are challenging tobacco control measures as violations of trade and investment agreements as they seek to bully countries into adopting weak laws, or none at all. The case is currently being heard by an arbitration panel affiliated with the World Bank. 

Costa Rica’s new warnings come a little more than two years after the country passed comprehensive tobacco control legislation and six years after it signed the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, the world’s first public health treaty.  Along with the health warning requirement, the law prohibits smoking in public areas, increases tobacco taxes and severely restricts the advertising of tobacco products.

Tobacco kills about six million people worldwide each year and is projected to kill one billion people this century unless countries take strong action to prevent it.  By enacting the graphic health warnings and other effective measures, Costa Rica has joined a movement sweeping across Latin America aimed at curbing tobacco use and saving lives.

(From TobaccoFreeKids.org)

(From SmokeFree Resource Center, NHS)
(From the FDA, Food and Drug Administration)

(From the FDA, Food and Drug Administration)

The Real Cost Commercial: “Bully”

Bullies, they like to tell you what to do. They don’t wait until you’re good and ready—it’s all about what they want and when they want it. Cigarettes are like bullies. Hit play and ask yourself, do you want tobacco to control you?

(From US Food and Drug Administration)


No smoker should have to quit alone. Share if you promise to be your loved one’s biggest fan, biggest supporter, and a shoulder to lean on during their quit journey.

No smoker should have to quit alone. Share if you promise to be your loved one’s biggest fan, biggest supporter, and a shoulder to lean on during their quit journey.

How Tobacco Bonds Work, and What Can Go Wrong

States and localities got cash up front but may end up paying back a lot more than they expected.

It all began when states settled their lawsuits against Big Tobacco.
After a long fight, states would finally get billions to cover the health costs of smoking, in perpetuity.
But some government officials wanted the money up front, to cover all sorts of budgetary needs. They said it would be better to get cash now in case tobacco companies couldn’t pay later on or if cigarette sales plummeted.
The answer: bonds. A bond is like a loan. Investors buy the bonds, providing states with cash. States repay the bondholders using the tobacco money. The typical bond lasts 30 years or less and pays interest every year.
If tobacco payments fall short, investors have no right – ‘no recourse’ – to be repaid with taxpayer money. But they retain rights to future tobacco payments. Because of the steep payments promised to some bondholders, that could take years or decades in which taxpayers lose out on the tobacco money.
In all, states, counties, cities, and territories sold some $36 billion in tobacco bonds that are still outstanding. Most had routine repayment terms. But to get extra cash up front, some sold capital appreciation bonds, or CABs which came with steeper repayments terms.
With CABs, no payments are required until they mature, often in 40 years or more. In the meantime, the interest compounds into a huge balance owed. In all, governments sold about $3 billion of CABs – for which they promised to repay $64 billion.
The deals assumed there would be enough settlement money available to pay off the CABs early. But people are smoking less. So tobacco payments to states are down, too — and that means they can’t repay the CABs early, if at all.
States can avoid defaulting on CABs — for a price. New Jersey recently pledged more of its tobacco money to avoid defaulting on $186 million of CABs on which it owed $1.3 billion in 2041.
By pledging another $406 million to investors — all of its remaining tobacco money from 2017 through 2023 — New Jersey will be able to repay its CABs early. The alternative – pay investors out of the tobacco money until the full debt was satisfied – would have meant paying an estimated $1.6 billion to the bondholders over many years. By putting more money into the pot now, the state also got investors to pony up an additional $92 million for this year’s budget.
(From ProPublica)

christinechronicles:

Cigarette health warnings in Peru

I saw these labels on cigarettes in Peru while traveling and thought man these pictures must deter people from smoking or make people think about quitting.

Apparently Philip Morris is now suing Uruguay for $25 million because of these ads. More on that story here.

New York City Health Department Data Show Increase in Adult Smoking Rate
For the first time since 2007, there are over one million smokers in New York City New “Imagine for Life” ad campaign encourages light daily smokers and non-daily smokers to quit.
September 15, 2014 – The Health Department today released new 2013 data showing 16.1 percent of adult New Yorkers are smokers, a significant increase from the city’s lowest recorded adult smoking rate of 14 percent in 2010. For the first time since 2007, there are over one million smokers in New York City who are at risk of developing a smoking-related illness, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, emphysema, lung and other cancers.
The Health Department also launched a new ad campaign today called “Imagine for Life” that focuses on the experience of light daily smokers and non-daily smokers (those smoking some days but not every day). Non-daily and light daily smokers now make up 76 percent of the New York City smoking population, compared with 64 percent in 2002. The new ads inform smokers that even the minimal health effects they feel after smoking, including a morning cough, are indications of their bodies’ negative reaction to smoking, and are just a preview of the daily suffering caused by smoking-related illness. The television ads will run for the next four weeks. Subway ads for this campaign will run during the month of October.
More…
(From New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)

New York City Health Department Data Show Increase in Adult Smoking Rate

For the first time since 2007, there are over one million smokers in New York City New “Imagine for Life” ad campaign encourages light daily smokers and non-daily smokers to quit.

September 15, 2014 – The Health Department today released new 2013 data showing 16.1 percent of adult New Yorkers are smokers, a significant increase from the city’s lowest recorded adult smoking rate of 14 percent in 2010. For the first time since 2007, there are over one million smokers in New York City who are at risk of developing a smoking-related illness, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, emphysema, lung and other cancers.

The Health Department also launched a new ad campaign today called “Imagine for Life” that focuses on the experience of light daily smokers and non-daily smokers (those smoking some days but not every day). Non-daily and light daily smokers now make up 76 percent of the New York City smoking population, compared with 64 percent in 2002. The new ads inform smokers that even the minimal health effects they feel after smoking, including a morning cough, are indications of their bodies’ negative reaction to smoking, and are just a preview of the daily suffering caused by smoking-related illness. The television ads will run for the next four weeks. Subway ads for this campaign will run during the month of October.

More…

(From New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)