Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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Tobacco smoking in the U.S.
Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.

postgraphics:

Tobacco smoking in the U.S.

Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.


What happens when a smoker quits

What happens when a smoker quits


Stop Smoking
Start Repairing

Stop Smoking

Start Repairing

Public Health England stop smoking health harms ‘Toxic cycle’ ad

businessweek:

Smoking from a hookah carries many of the same risks as cigarettes, and the practice is gaining traction with teens.

businessweek:

Smoking from a hookah carries many of the same risks as cigarettes, and the practice is gaining traction with teens.

What is secondhand smoke?
Secondhand smoke is the combination of smoke from the burning end of a cigarette and the smoke exhaled by smokers. You can be exposed to secondhand smoke in homes, cars, the workplace, and public places, such as bars, restaurants, and recreational settings.
In the United States, the source of most secondhand smoke is cigarettes, followed by pipes, cigars, and other tobacco products. Secondhand smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals. Hundreds of the chemicals are toxic and about 70 are known to cause cancer,
(From CDC)

What is secondhand smoke?

Secondhand smoke is the combination of smoke from the burning end of a cigarette and the smoke exhaled by smokers. You can be exposed to secondhand smoke in homes, cars, the workplace, and public places, such as bars, restaurants, and recreational settings.

In the United States, the source of most secondhand smoke is cigarettes, followed by pipes, cigars, and other tobacco products. Secondhand smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals. Hundreds of the chemicals are toxic and about 70 are known to cause cancer,

(From CDC)

The Study That Helped Spur the U.S. Stop-Smoking Movement

By Elizabeth Mendes

Most Americans born into the generations that came after the Baby Boom have gone their entire lives aware that smoking can cause lung cancer. But this fact has not always been well-known – and at one time it wasn’t known at all.

Actually, it wasn’t even until cigarettes were mass produced and popularized by manufacturers in the first part of the 20th century that there was cause for alarm. Prior to the 1900s, lung cancer was a rare disease. Turn-of-the-century changes though, gave way to an era of rapidly increasing lung cancer rates. New technology allowed cigarettes to be produced on a large scale, and advertising glamorized smoking. The military got in on it too – giving cigarettes out for free to soldiers during World Wars I and II.

Cigarette smoking increased rapidly through the 1950s, becoming much more widespread. Per capita cigarette consumption soared from 54 per year in 1900, to 4,345 per year in 1963. And, lung cancer went from rarity to more commonplace – by the early 1950s it became “the most common cancer diagnosed in American men,” writes American Cancer Society Chief Medical Officer Otis Brawley, M.D., in an article published November 2013 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

However, though tobacco usage and lung cancer rates increased in tandem, few experts suspected a connection, according to Brawley and his co-authors.

(More ……)
From American Cancer Society

CDC: Tips From Former Smokers - Amanda’s Ad

Smoking while you’re pregnant can cause serious health problems for you and your baby. In this TV ad for CDC’s Tips From Former Smokers campaign, Amanda talks about the time her baby spent in a hospital incubator. Amanda had tried to quit smoking, but she was unable to overcome her addiction to cigarettes. Her baby was born 2 months early, weighing only 3 pounds.

(From CDC)

The Real Cost Campaign

Every day in the United States, more than 3,200 youth under age 18 smoke their first cigarette —and more than 700 youth under age 18 become daily smokers—highlighting a critical need for stronger, targeted youth tobacco prevention efforts.To combat this critical issue, FDA’s first youth tobacco prevention campaign, “The Real Cost,” targets at-risk youth aged 12-17 who are open to smoking or already experimenting with cigarettes.

(From FDA)

In Ireland: Eight-year jail term for breaking planned law on plain packaging for tobacco
Planned law would let Minister fo rHealth determine how cigarettes are packaged
Anyone who breaks new laws imposing plain packaging on all tobacco products could face up to eight years in jail, according to the text of Minister for Health James Reilly’s proposed legislation.
The Public Health (Standardised Packaging of Tobacco) Bill 2014, published on Friday, provides for the imposition of penalties both on individuals and “body corporates”.
The legislation will not take full effect until May 2017 to allow for the dissipation of existing supplies of tobacco products bearing manufacturers’ names and logos.
(More…)(From The Irish Times)

In Ireland: Eight-year jail term for breaking planned law on plain packaging for tobacco

Planned law would let Minister fo rHealth determine how cigarettes are packaged

Anyone who breaks new laws imposing plain packaging on all tobacco products could face up to eight years in jail, according to the text of Minister for Health James Reilly’s proposed legislation.

The Public Health (Standardised Packaging of Tobacco) Bill 2014, published on Friday, provides for the imposition of penalties both on individuals and “body corporates”.

The legislation will not take full effect until May 2017 to allow for the dissipation of existing supplies of tobacco products bearing manufacturers’ names and logos.

(More…)
(From The Irish Times)