Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget.
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From UK’s Office for National Statistics (Click on image for more resolution)

From UK’s Office for National Statistics (Click on image for more resolution)

allheartcare:

The Battle Against Tobacco Rages On

In 1964, the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health made it clear — smoking causes cancer. This news hit the country like a bombshell. At the time, more than 40 percent of American adults smoked, and smoking was widely accepted and considered normal behavior.

Today, 50 years later, we’ve cut the US smoking rate by more than half. Increasingly, effective tobacco control efforts have prevented at least eight million Americans from dying prematurely.
It’s a great public health success, one of the biggest of the 20th century.
But the battle against tobacco is far from over. At least 5.6 million kids alive today will die prematurely from smoking if current rates continue. This map shows how many will die in each state.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tom-frieden-md-mph/the-battle-against-tobacc_b_4597624.html

allheartcare:

The Battle Against Tobacco Rages On

In 1964, the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health made it clear — smoking causes cancer. This news hit the country like a bombshell. At the time, more than 40 percent of American adults smoked, and smoking was widely accepted and considered normal behavior.

Today, 50 years later, we’ve cut the US smoking rate by more than half. Increasingly, effective tobacco control efforts have prevented at least eight million Americans from dying prematurely.

It’s a great public health success, one of the biggest of the 20th century.

But the battle against tobacco is far from over. At least 5.6 million kids alive today will die prematurely from smoking if current rates continue. This map shows how many will die in each state.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tom-frieden-md-mph/the-battle-against-tobacc_b_4597624.html

Graphic Warnings Begin to Appear on Cigarette Packs in Costa Rica
Costa Rica has taken another important step to protect public health from the terrible toll of tobacco use

Costa Rica has taken another important step to protect public health from the terrible toll of tobacco use, which is the number one cause of preventable death worldwide.
Starting last week, pictorial warning labels are required on cigarette packs sold in Costa Rica.  The new warnings cover 50 percent of both the front and back of cigarette packs and feature gruesome images depicting the consequences of smoking, as well as text warnings.  Retailers and suppliers have a two-month grace period to sell their stock of old packs.
Costa Rica joins 13 other countries in Latin America – and at least 62 countries worldwide – in requiring graphic cigarette warnings.
These countries include Uruguay, which is currently fighting a lawsuit brought by tobacco giant Philip Morris International over its warnings and other tobacco control measures.  Increasingly, Philip Morris and other tobacco companies are challenging tobacco control measures as violations of trade and investment agreements as they seek to bully countries into adopting weak laws, or none at all. The case is currently being heard by an arbitration panel affiliated with the World Bank. 
Costa Rica’s new warnings come a little more than two years after the country passed comprehensive tobacco control legislation and six years after it signed the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, the world’s first public health treaty.  Along with the health warning requirement, the law prohibits smoking in public areas, increases tobacco taxes and severely restricts the advertising of tobacco products.
Tobacco kills about six million people worldwide each year and is projected to kill one billion people this century unless countries take strong action to prevent it.  By enacting the graphic health warnings and other effective measures, Costa Rica has joined a movement sweeping across Latin America aimed at curbing tobacco use and saving lives.
(From TobaccoFreeKids.org)

Graphic Warnings Begin to Appear on Cigarette Packs in Costa Rica

Costa Rica has taken another important step to protect public health from the terrible toll of tobacco use

Costa Rica has taken another important step to protect public health from the terrible toll of tobacco use, which is the number one cause of preventable death worldwide.

Starting last week, pictorial warning labels are required on cigarette packs sold in Costa Rica.  The new warnings cover 50 percent of both the front and back of cigarette packs and feature gruesome images depicting the consequences of smoking, as well as text warnings.  Retailers and suppliers have a two-month grace period to sell their stock of old packs.

Costa Rica joins 13 other countries in Latin America – and at least 62 countries worldwide – in requiring graphic cigarette warnings.

These countries include Uruguay, which is currently fighting a lawsuit brought by tobacco giant Philip Morris International over its warnings and other tobacco control measures.  Increasingly, Philip Morris and other tobacco companies are challenging tobacco control measures as violations of trade and investment agreements as they seek to bully countries into adopting weak laws, or none at all. The case is currently being heard by an arbitration panel affiliated with the World Bank. 

Costa Rica’s new warnings come a little more than two years after the country passed comprehensive tobacco control legislation and six years after it signed the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, the world’s first public health treaty.  Along with the health warning requirement, the law prohibits smoking in public areas, increases tobacco taxes and severely restricts the advertising of tobacco products.

Tobacco kills about six million people worldwide each year and is projected to kill one billion people this century unless countries take strong action to prevent it.  By enacting the graphic health warnings and other effective measures, Costa Rica has joined a movement sweeping across Latin America aimed at curbing tobacco use and saving lives.

(From TobaccoFreeKids.org)

(From SmokeFree Resource Center, NHS)
(From the FDA, Food and Drug Administration)

(From the FDA, Food and Drug Administration)

The Real Cost Commercial: “Bully”

Bullies, they like to tell you what to do. They don’t wait until you’re good and ready—it’s all about what they want and when they want it. Cigarettes are like bullies. Hit play and ask yourself, do you want tobacco to control you?

(From US Food and Drug Administration)


No smoker should have to quit alone. Share if you promise to be your loved one’s biggest fan, biggest supporter, and a shoulder to lean on during their quit journey.

No smoker should have to quit alone. Share if you promise to be your loved one’s biggest fan, biggest supporter, and a shoulder to lean on during their quit journey.

More than a quarter-million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used e-cigarettes in 2013
Study finds youth who have used e-cigarettes are almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes 
More than a quarter of a million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used electronic cigarettes in 2013, according to a CDC study published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research.  This number reflects a three-fold increase, from about 79,000 in 2011, to more than 263,000 in 2013.
The data, which comes from the 2011, 2012, and 2013 National Youth Tobacco surveys of middle and high school students, show that youth who had never smoked conventional cigarettes but who used e-cigarettes were almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes as those who had never used e-cigarettes.  Among non-smoking youth who had ever used e-cigarettes, 43.9 percent said they intended to smoke conventional cigarettes within the next year, compared with 21.5 percent of those who had never used e-cigarettes.
“We are very concerned about nicotine use among our youth, regardless of whether it comes from conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes or other tobacco products.  Not only is nicotine highly addictive, it can harm adolescent brain development.” said Tim McAfee, M.D., M.P.H., Director of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health.
There is evidence that nicotine’s adverse effects on adolescent brain development could result in lasting deficits in cognitive function.  Nicotine is highly addictive.  About three out of every four teen smokers become adult smokers, even if they intend to quit in a few years.
(More from CDC)

More than a quarter-million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used e-cigarettes in 2013

Study finds youth who have used e-cigarettes are almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes

More than a quarter of a million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used electronic cigarettes in 2013, according to a CDC study published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research.  This number reflects a three-fold increase, from about 79,000 in 2011, to more than 263,000 in 2013.

The data, which comes from the 2011, 2012, and 2013 National Youth Tobacco surveys of middle and high school students, show that youth who had never smoked conventional cigarettes but who used e-cigarettes were almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes as those who had never used e-cigarettes.  Among non-smoking youth who had ever used e-cigarettes, 43.9 percent said they intended to smoke conventional cigarettes within the next year, compared with 21.5 percent of those who had never used e-cigarettes.

“We are very concerned about nicotine use among our youth, regardless of whether it comes from conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes or other tobacco products.  Not only is nicotine highly addictive, it can harm adolescent brain development.” said Tim McAfee, M.D., M.P.H., Director of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health.

There is evidence that nicotine’s adverse effects on adolescent brain development could result in lasting deficits in cognitive function.  Nicotine is highly addictive.  About three out of every four teen smokers become adult smokers, even if they intend to quit in a few years.

(More from CDC)

(From CDC)
postgraphics:

Tobacco smoking in the U.S.
Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.

postgraphics:

Tobacco smoking in the U.S.

Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.