Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget. Flash Player 9 is required.
Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget.
Flash Player 9 is required.

postgraphics:

Tobacco smoking in the U.S.
Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.

postgraphics:

Tobacco smoking in the U.S.

Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.

ppaction:

Timeline: 100 Years of Birth Control

Since Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger coined the term “birth control” in 1914, contraception has truly revolutionized women’s lives in the United States, and around the world. Brush up on your birth control history, and see just how far we’ve come in 100 years.

SEE THE HIRES VERSION HERE

Urging Indians To ‘Take The Poo To The Loo’
Sanitation and hygiene remain critical problems for India, with about 50% of its population still defecating in the open. UNICEF India’s #poo2loo campaign aims to raise awareness about this issue.
(From Urban Times)

Urging Indians To ‘Take The Poo To The Loo’

Sanitation and hygiene remain critical problems for India, with about 50% of its population still defecating in the open. UNICEF India’s #poo2loo campaign aims to raise awareness about this issue.

(From Urban Times)


What happens when a smoker quits

What happens when a smoker quits


Stop Smoking
Start Repairing

Stop Smoking

Start Repairing

nprglobalhealth:

Dogs Carry Kissing Bug Disease In Texas And Latin America
We often think about people spreading diseases around the world. This spring,vacationers brought chikungunya from the Caribbean to the United States. Businessmen have likely spread Ebola across international borders in West Africa. And health care workers have carried a new virus from the Middle East to Asia and Europe.
But what about (wo)man’s best friend?
From shelter mutts to purebred show dogs, canines across the state of Texas are becoming infected with a parasite that causes a potentially deadly disease in people, scientists report Wednesday in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.
Although the dogs aren’t spreading the parasite directly to people, they are helping to make the disease more prevalent in the southern U.S. (Not to mention the parasite can make dogs sick and even kill them.)
The disease is called Chagas. And it’s transmitted by an insect known as the kissing bug.
Don’t let the name fool you. This isn’t a friendly bug. The insect bites the faces and lips of sleeping people, then passes on the Chagas parasite through its fecal matter. (The parasite is a protist called Trypanosoma cruzi.)
About 300,000 people in the U.S. are infected with the Chagas parasite. Researchers have estimated that the disease cost the U.S. about $800 million each year in lost work time and medical bills.
Many people with Chagas’ disease don’t even know it. They have no symptoms. But for about a third of those infected, the parasite damages the heart or digestive tract. And there are no drugs to cure a chronic infection. So once the parasite takes up residency in somebody’s tissue, it never leaves.
Continue reading.
Photo: Don’t let the name fool you. The kissing bug, or Rhodnius prolixus, isn’t your friend. The insect transmits the Chagas parasite when it bites someone’s face. (Dr. Erwin Huebner/University of Manitoba)

nprglobalhealth:

Dogs Carry Kissing Bug Disease In Texas And Latin America

We often think about people spreading diseases around the world. This spring,vacationers brought chikungunya from the Caribbean to the United States. Businessmen have likely spread Ebola across international borders in West Africa. And health care workers have carried a new virus from the Middle East to Asia and Europe.

But what about (wo)man’s best friend?

From shelter mutts to purebred show dogs, canines across the state of Texas are becoming infected with a parasite that causes a potentially deadly disease in people, scientists report Wednesday in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Although the dogs aren’t spreading the parasite directly to people, they are helping to make the disease more prevalent in the southern U.S. (Not to mention the parasite can make dogs sick and even kill them.)

The disease is called Chagas. And it’s transmitted by an insect known as the kissing bug.

Don’t let the name fool you. This isn’t a friendly bug. The insect bites the faces and lips of sleeping people, then passes on the Chagas parasite through its fecal matter. (The parasite is a protist called Trypanosoma cruzi.)

About 300,000 people in the U.S. are infected with the Chagas parasite. Researchers have estimated that the disease cost the U.S. about $800 million each year in lost work time and medical bills.

Many people with Chagas’ disease don’t even know it. They have no symptoms. But for about a third of those infected, the parasite damages the heart or digestive tract. And there are no drugs to cure a chronic infection. So once the parasite takes up residency in somebody’s tissue, it never leaves.

Continue reading.

Photo: Don’t let the name fool you. The kissing bug, or Rhodnius prolixus, isn’t your friend. The insect transmits the Chagas parasite when it bites someone’s face. (Dr. Erwin Huebner/University of Manitoba)

nychealth:

Get Health Bucks!
There are a few ways for you to get Health Bucks to use on fresh fruits and vegetables at our farmers’ markets:

1. Shop at a farmers’ market using your EBT card – for every $5 you spend using EBT, you’ll receive a $2 Health Buck!
Find out which markets accept EBT. Most do! And those that don’t are noted on our map.
Visit the market information tent and look for the market manager .
Tell the market manager how much you plan to spend using your SNAP benefits.
Swipe your EBT card to purchase as many wooden tokens as you’ll need (most markets use tokens for EBT, credit or debit purchases). These tokens act like cash at the market, can be spent at the farmers’ tables and never expire. (Remember: you will receive one $2 Health Buck for every $5 you spend in EBT.)


2. Participate in an activity at a community-based organization that distributes Health Bucks.
3. Attend a free nutrition and cooking demonstration or food workshop for kids. You’ll also receive free tastings, as well as nutrition and recipe handouts in addition to the Health Buck.
Look for the carrot and apple icons on our map to find participating markets.
Redeem your Health Bucks (at any market)!
1. Go to your local farmers’ market.
2. Find items that you would like to purchase.
3. Give the farmer your $2 Health Buck as payment for your fresh fruits and vegetables!

nychealth:

Get Health Bucks!

There are a few ways for you to get Health Bucks to use on fresh fruits and vegetables at our farmers’ markets:

1. Shop at a farmers’ market using your EBT card – for every $5 you spend using EBT, you’ll receive a $2 Health Buck!

  • Find out which markets accept EBT. Most do! And those that don’t are noted on our map.
  • Visit the market information tent and look for the market manager .
  • Tell the market manager how much you plan to spend using your SNAP benefits.
  • Swipe your EBT card to purchase as many wooden tokens as you’ll need (most markets use tokens for EBT, credit or debit purchases). These tokens act like cash at the market, can be spent at the farmers’ tables and never expire. (Remember: you will receive one $2 Health Buck for every $5 you spend in EBT.)

2. Participate in an activity at a community-based organization that distributes Health Bucks.

3. Attend a free nutrition and cooking demonstration or food workshop for kids. You’ll also receive free tastings, as well as nutrition and recipe handouts in addition to the Health Buck.

  • Look for the carrot and apple icons on our map to find participating markets.

Redeem your Health Bucks (at any market)!

1. Go to your local farmers’ market.

2. Find items that you would like to purchase.

3. Give the farmer your $2 Health Buck as payment for your fresh fruits and vegetables!

nprglobalhealth:

Feeling The Heat, Burning The Suits: Reporting On Ebola From Sierra Leone

NPR’s Jason Beaubien is in Sierra Leone, covering the Ebola outbreak that began in March in Guinea and has spread to neighboring countries. When we spoke Thursday, he had just toured the treatment center built by Doctors Without Borders in the town of Kailahun. With 64 beds, it’s the largest Ebola isolation ward ever built. Currently there are 31 patients.

How’s it going?

Never a dull day here.

Can you describe the treatment center?

It’s basically a compound with a series of different tents. There are tents where people get suited up to go in. Another tent seems to be for storage, and one of the tents contains a lab. Then there’s a double fence about 3 1/2 feet high, made of orange plastic mesh. They designed the fence so people can see where the patients are, so it wouldn’t seem as if the patients are completely walled off.

Why a double fence?

So no one can get within 6 feet of someone who has Ebola. In case a patient from the isolation area reaches out or vomits, [Doctors Without Borders] wants to make sure there won’t be any accidental contamination.

How do the doctors record information on the patients?

Doctors go into the isolation area completely suited up, do their rounds and write down what’s happening with patients. Then they stand next to the fence and shout out to people on the other side of the fence [information about each patient]. Say, for patient 105, the doctor says, “diarrhea, vomiting.” Then the doctor’s notes [made inside the isolation area] are burned.

Where do they burn the notes?

They have a big pit in the back.

What else do they burn?

They burn everything. They say nothing comes out of isolation — although obviously they’re taking blood samples out. People come out. They strip off their protective gear, the Tyvek suits they put over their entire body and shoes.

Continue reading.

Top: Construction workers repair the roof inside the isolation area at the Doctors Without Borders treatment center in Kailahun.

Bottom: All workers in the isolation area must wear a head-to-toe protective suit.

Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR

actgnetwork:

It is with great sadness that we acknowledge the death of Joep Lange on Malaysia Airlines flight 017. Joep was an extraordinary clinician, scientist, and humanitarian who fought ceaselessly for the rights of persons living with HIV/AIDS and to assure global access to antiretroviral therapy. Joep was a great friend of the ACTG—he chaired the review of the ACTG during a previous competitive renewal cycle and provided invaluable insights through formal and informal consultation that helped shape the current ACTG agenda. Many of us in the ACTG counted Joep and his partner, Jacqueline, as esteemed colleagues and cherished friends. The impact of their loss is immeasurable. We offer our deepest condolences to their families and colleagues, and we are committed to redouble our efforts to realizing the vision to which Joep had devoted his life.
- Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, ACTG Chair #hiv #aids #research #mh17 http://ift.tt/1teLvpi

actgnetwork:

It is with great sadness that we acknowledge the death of Joep Lange on Malaysia Airlines flight 017. Joep was an extraordinary clinician, scientist, and humanitarian who fought ceaselessly for the rights of persons living with HIV/AIDS and to assure global access to antiretroviral therapy. Joep was a great friend of the ACTG—he chaired the review of the ACTG during a previous competitive renewal cycle and provided invaluable insights through formal and informal consultation that helped shape the current ACTG agenda. Many of us in the ACTG counted Joep and his partner, Jacqueline, as esteemed colleagues and cherished friends. The impact of their loss is immeasurable. We offer our deepest condolences to their families and colleagues, and we are committed to redouble our efforts to realizing the vision to which Joep had devoted his life.
- Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, ACTG Chair #hiv #aids #research #mh17 http://ift.tt/1teLvpi

gov-info:

CDC & HHS Gov Docs: Health Information in 33 Languages

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) offers free, downloadable fact sheets, pamphlets and educational materials available in many languages

Order or download books, fact sheets, pamphlets, and educational materials at CDC-INFO on Demand. If you’re ordering fewer than 5 of any item, please consider downloading the items. Visit CDC Stacks to download materials only available online.