Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget. Flash Player 9 is required.
Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget.
Flash Player 9 is required.


No smoker should have to quit alone. Share if you promise to be your loved one’s biggest fan, biggest supporter, and a shoulder to lean on during their quit journey.

No smoker should have to quit alone. Share if you promise to be your loved one’s biggest fan, biggest supporter, and a shoulder to lean on during their quit journey.

(From the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, IHME)

How Tobacco Bonds Work, and What Can Go Wrong

States and localities got cash up front but may end up paying back a lot more than they expected.

It all began when states settled their lawsuits against Big Tobacco.
After a long fight, states would finally get billions to cover the health costs of smoking, in perpetuity.
But some government officials wanted the money up front, to cover all sorts of budgetary needs. They said it would be better to get cash now in case tobacco companies couldn’t pay later on or if cigarette sales plummeted.
The answer: bonds. A bond is like a loan. Investors buy the bonds, providing states with cash. States repay the bondholders using the tobacco money. The typical bond lasts 30 years or less and pays interest every year.
If tobacco payments fall short, investors have no right – ‘no recourse’ – to be repaid with taxpayer money. But they retain rights to future tobacco payments. Because of the steep payments promised to some bondholders, that could take years or decades in which taxpayers lose out on the tobacco money.
In all, states, counties, cities, and territories sold some $36 billion in tobacco bonds that are still outstanding. Most had routine repayment terms. But to get extra cash up front, some sold capital appreciation bonds, or CABs which came with steeper repayments terms.
With CABs, no payments are required until they mature, often in 40 years or more. In the meantime, the interest compounds into a huge balance owed. In all, governments sold about $3 billion of CABs – for which they promised to repay $64 billion.
The deals assumed there would be enough settlement money available to pay off the CABs early. But people are smoking less. So tobacco payments to states are down, too — and that means they can’t repay the CABs early, if at all.
States can avoid defaulting on CABs — for a price. New Jersey recently pledged more of its tobacco money to avoid defaulting on $186 million of CABs on which it owed $1.3 billion in 2041.
By pledging another $406 million to investors — all of its remaining tobacco money from 2017 through 2023 — New Jersey will be able to repay its CABs early. The alternative – pay investors out of the tobacco money until the full debt was satisfied – would have meant paying an estimated $1.6 billion to the bondholders over many years. By putting more money into the pot now, the state also got investors to pony up an additional $92 million for this year’s budget.
(From ProPublica)

christinechronicles:

Cigarette health warnings in Peru

I saw these labels on cigarettes in Peru while traveling and thought man these pictures must deter people from smoking or make people think about quitting.

Apparently Philip Morris is now suing Uruguay for $25 million because of these ads. More on that story here.

New York City Health Department Data Show Increase in Adult Smoking Rate
For the first time since 2007, there are over one million smokers in New York City New “Imagine for Life” ad campaign encourages light daily smokers and non-daily smokers to quit.
September 15, 2014 – The Health Department today released new 2013 data showing 16.1 percent of adult New Yorkers are smokers, a significant increase from the city’s lowest recorded adult smoking rate of 14 percent in 2010. For the first time since 2007, there are over one million smokers in New York City who are at risk of developing a smoking-related illness, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, emphysema, lung and other cancers.
The Health Department also launched a new ad campaign today called “Imagine for Life” that focuses on the experience of light daily smokers and non-daily smokers (those smoking some days but not every day). Non-daily and light daily smokers now make up 76 percent of the New York City smoking population, compared with 64 percent in 2002. The new ads inform smokers that even the minimal health effects they feel after smoking, including a morning cough, are indications of their bodies’ negative reaction to smoking, and are just a preview of the daily suffering caused by smoking-related illness. The television ads will run for the next four weeks. Subway ads for this campaign will run during the month of October.
More…
(From New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)

New York City Health Department Data Show Increase in Adult Smoking Rate

For the first time since 2007, there are over one million smokers in New York City New “Imagine for Life” ad campaign encourages light daily smokers and non-daily smokers to quit.

September 15, 2014 – The Health Department today released new 2013 data showing 16.1 percent of adult New Yorkers are smokers, a significant increase from the city’s lowest recorded adult smoking rate of 14 percent in 2010. For the first time since 2007, there are over one million smokers in New York City who are at risk of developing a smoking-related illness, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, emphysema, lung and other cancers.

The Health Department also launched a new ad campaign today called “Imagine for Life” that focuses on the experience of light daily smokers and non-daily smokers (those smoking some days but not every day). Non-daily and light daily smokers now make up 76 percent of the New York City smoking population, compared with 64 percent in 2002. The new ads inform smokers that even the minimal health effects they feel after smoking, including a morning cough, are indications of their bodies’ negative reaction to smoking, and are just a preview of the daily suffering caused by smoking-related illness. The television ads will run for the next four weeks. Subway ads for this campaign will run during the month of October.

More…

(From New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)

unicef:

This has saved the lives of 100 million children. But 17,000 children are still dying each day, mainly from preventable causes. The world needs to step up to end preventable child deaths. Find out how we do it in the new #Promise4Children report: http://uni.cf/APR2014

unicef:

This has saved the lives of 100 million children. But 17,000 children are still dying each day, mainly from preventable causes. 

The world needs to step up to end preventable child deaths. Find out how we do it in the new #Promise4Children report: http://uni.cf/APR2014

nychealth:

Dance4Demand in Support of Female Condoms!
Tuesday, September 16, 2014, marks the third annual Global Female Condom Day (GFCD) — a day of education and advocacy dedicated to increasing awareness, accessibility and use of female condoms worldwide. Individuals and organizations are advancing the global movement for female condoms by participating in this international day of action. GFCD is a collaborative effort between the National Female Condom Coalition (NFCC) and the Universal Access for Female Condoms (UAFC) Joint Programme. For more information, visit FemaleCondomDay.org. Connect with GFCD social media through #Dance4Demand, #GFCD2014, and #femalecondoms.
Sexual and reproductive health advocates in New York City, and around the world, will Dance4Demand this GFCD to call for the increased demand of this vital health product. Today, NYC Health will work with several community-based organizations, throughout the five boroughs of New York City, to highlight this highly effective sexual health tool. Lifebeat, a leading national nonprofit dedicated to educating America’s youth about HIV prevention, will be promoting the Health Department’s NYC Condom Availability Program (NYCAP) and GFCD at their events.
 
FC2 in NYC
NYC Health has been distributing female condoms (also known as FC2s) since 1998.  In 2013, we distributed 1.3 million FC2s through thousands of condom distribution partners across the city.  A recent NYC Health evaluation found that while awareness of the FC2 was high, use was low among all populations.  Only 1 out of every 5 survey respondents reported ever using a FC2— a statistic we will continue to work hard to increase.  A first step to increasing FC2 acceptance and use will be Dancing4Demand on Global Female Condom Day.    Women and men in NYC and across the globe will be dancing in parks, at community centers, schools, clinics and even the offices of public officials to clearly and categorically show their demand for the FC2. 
The NYC Condom Availability Program will be at the following locations Dancing 4 Demand!

 
Monday September 15th, 2014
Manhattan: Lifebeat at Irving Plaza 6-8PM
 
Tuesday September 16th, 2014
Bronx: BOOM! Health at Fordham Road and Grand Concourse (overpass) 10AM-2PM
Brooklyn: CAMBA at 885 Flatbush Ave 12-4PM
Manhattan: Washington Heights Corner Project at 181st & St. Nicholas 11AM-3PM
Lifebeat at Times Square 1-3PM                                
Queens: Queens Pride House at 76-19 Roosevelt Ave 2-6PM
Staten Island: CHASI at 166 Port Richmond Ave 8AM-12PM

nychealth:

Dance4Demand in Support of Female Condoms!

Tuesday, September 16, 2014, marks the third annual Global Female Condom Day (GFCD) — a day of education and advocacy dedicated to increasing awareness, accessibility and use of female condoms worldwide. Individuals and organizations are advancing the global movement for female condoms by participating in this international day of action. GFCD is a collaborative effort between the National Female Condom Coalition (NFCC) and the Universal Access for Female Condoms (UAFC) Joint Programme. For more information, visit FemaleCondomDay.org. Connect with GFCD social media through #Dance4Demand, #GFCD2014, and #femalecondoms.

Sexual and reproductive health advocates in New York City, and around the world, will Dance4Demand this GFCD to call for the increased demand of this vital health product. Today, NYC Health will work with several community-based organizations, throughout the five boroughs of New York City, to highlight this highly effective sexual health tool. Lifebeat, a leading national nonprofit dedicated to educating America’s youth about HIV prevention, will be promoting the Health Department’s NYC Condom Availability Program (NYCAP) and GFCD at their events.

 

FC2 in NYC

NYC Health has been distributing female condoms (also known as FC2s) since 1998.  In 2013, we distributed 1.3 million FC2s through thousands of condom distribution partners across the city.  A recent NYC Health evaluation found that while awareness of the FC2 was high, use was low among all populations.  Only 1 out of every 5 survey respondents reported ever using a FC2— a statistic we will continue to work hard to increase.  A first step to increasing FC2 acceptance and use will be Dancing4Demand on Global Female Condom Day.    Women and men in NYC and across the globe will be dancing in parks, at community centers, schools, clinics and even the offices of public officials to clearly and categorically show their demand for the FC2.

The NYC Condom Availability Program will be at the following locations Dancing 4 Demand!

 

Monday September 15th, 2014

Manhattan: Lifebeat at Irving Plaza 6-8PM

 

Tuesday September 16th, 2014

Bronx: BOOM! Health at Fordham Road and Grand Concourse (overpass) 10AM-2PM

Brooklyn: CAMBA at 885 Flatbush Ave 12-4PM

Manhattan: Washington Heights Corner Project at 181st & St. Nicholas 11AM-3PM

Lifebeat at Times Square 1-3PM                               

Queens: Queens Pride House at 76-19 Roosevelt Ave 2-6PM

Staten Island: CHASI at 166 Port Richmond Ave 8AM-12PM

Late Night with Public Health

Public health guest stars on The Colbert Report and The Daily Show

Published September 4, 2014

As comedic news anchors for Comedy Central, Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart use searing, sarcastic segments to bring current events to the attention of their viewers. And it is overwhelmingly popular. For example, Colbert’s witty, ultra-conservative persona has increased his popularity among 18- to 29-year-olds, which is a demographic group that NPR, MSNBC, and other conventional news outlets have struggled to reach. For public health, this advantage gives these dynamic late night news shows The Colbert Report and The Daily Show opportunities to disseminate health information in the context of witty, if sometimes irreverent, stories to this and other key demographics.

(More from The 2x2 Project: Health Beyond the Headlines)

nprglobalhealth:

How Do You Catch Ebola: By Air, Sweat Or Water?
There’s no question Ebola is one of the most terrifying diseases out there. It causes a painful death, typically kills more than 50 percent of those infected and essentially has no cure.
But if you compare how contagious the Ebola virus is to, say SARS or the measles, Ebola just doesn’t stack up. In fact, the virus is harder to catch than the common cold.
That’s because there has been no evidence that Ebola spreads between people through the air. Health experts repeatedly emphasize that human-to-human transmission requires direct contact with infected bodily fluids, including blood, vomit and feces.
And to infect, those fluids have to reach a break in the skin or the mucous membranes found around your eyes, mouth and nose.
But that hasn’t stopped two-thirds of Americans from thinking that the virus spreads “easily,” a poll from Harvard School of Public Health found in August. Almost 40 percent of the 1,025 people surveyed said they worry about an Ebola epidemic in the U.S. More than a quarter were concerned about catching the virus themselves.
Many questions still linger. Is Ebola really not airborne? Can it spread through contaminated water? What about through a drop of blood left behind on a table?
So we took those questions to two virologists: Alan Schmaljohn at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and Jean-Paul Gonzalez at Metabiota, a company that tracks global infectious diseases.
Continue reading.
Photo: A burial team in Barkedu, Liberia, buries their protective clothing alongside the body of an Ebola victim. It’s possible to catch the virus from clothing soiled by infected blood or other bodily fluids. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

How Do You Catch Ebola: By Air, Sweat Or Water?

There’s no question Ebola is one of the most terrifying diseases out there. It causes a painful death, typically kills more than 50 percent of those infected and essentially has no cure.

But if you compare how contagious the Ebola virus is to, say SARS or the measles, Ebola just doesn’t stack up. In fact, the virus is harder to catch than the common cold.

That’s because there has been no evidence that Ebola spreads between people through the air. Health experts repeatedly emphasize that human-to-human transmission requires direct contact with infected bodily fluids, including blood, vomit and feces.

And to infect, those fluids have to reach a break in the skin or the mucous membranes found around your eyes, mouth and nose.

But that hasn’t stopped two-thirds of Americans from thinking that the virus spreads “easily,” a poll from Harvard School of Public Health found in August. Almost 40 percent of the 1,025 people surveyed said they worry about an Ebola epidemic in the U.S. More than a quarter were concerned about catching the virus themselves.

Many questions still linger. Is Ebola really not airborne? Can it spread through contaminated water? What about through a drop of blood left behind on a table?

So we took those questions to two virologists: Alan Schmaljohn at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and Jean-Paul Gonzalez at Metabiota, a company that tracks global infectious diseases.

Continue reading.

Photo: A burial team in Barkedu, Liberia, buries their protective clothing alongside the body of an Ebola victim. It’s possible to catch the virus from clothing soiled by infected blood or other bodily fluids. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

plannedparenthood:

Life happens. So if you’ve experienced any changes lately  like you got married or celebrated your 26th birthday  you may not have to wait until the next Obamacare enrollment period to get health insurance. Check out this flowchart from Families USA and see where you stand.