Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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Things You Should Know About E-cigarette 

Things You Should Know About E-cigarette 

ucsdcancer:

Exercise and Cancer
For years we’ve known that exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle by keeping us strong and reducing the risk of heart disease and diabetes. It releases endorphins that make us feel better, physically and mentally – even if when we’re huffing and puffing we’re feeling a little tired.
We also know that physical activity is associated with reduced risk of colon, breast, uterine, lung and prostate cancers. But having cancer doesn’t change the equation. Indeed, for patients diagnosed with and treated for cancer, a life of regular physical activity can become even more critical to having a life with quality.
Physical activity is a critical component of energy balance, a term researchers use to describe how weight, diet and physical activity influence health. Indeed, researchers at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center are currently conducting a pair of studies to assess the effects of healthy diets and exercise programs on women at risk of breast cancer and breast cancer survivors. 
In a seminal series of papers published in 2012 in the journal Lancet, scientists from multiple institutions, including the UC San Diego, concluded that physical inactivity could explain more than 5 million deaths worldwide each year — a number comparable to mortality figures associated with smoking.
“A surprising finding was that inactivity explains 10 percent of deaths from both breast cancer and prostate cancer,” said Jim Sallis, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine and director of the Active Living Research program at UC San Diego. “Thus physical inactivity is a major contributor to common cancers of men and women.”
Regular exercise prevents obesity, which increases a person’s risk of a host of different cancers. It helps reduce inflammation, also linked to cancer, while boosting the body’s immune system function, which helps prevent cancer.
How much exercise do you need?The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention broadly recommends adults engage in “moderate-intensity physical activity for at least 150 minutes per week” (about 30 minutes per day) or “vigorous-intensity” exercise for at least 75 minutes per week. The former is defined as activities like walking briskly, dancing or riding a bike on flat terrain. The latter refers to stuff like race-walking, high-impact aerobics, robustly climbing stairs or participating in fast-moving sports like basketball or soccer.
The best time to begin a lifelong anti-cancer exercise program is today, right now. Once you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, the best time is still today, right now. Often, patients become sedentary after a cancer diagnosis and treatment. They’re going through or have been through a lot. It might seem too much to launch into an exercise regimen. People tend to slow down.
Don’t.
As contrary as it may seem, physical activity is the most effective long-term solution to fatigue, a common characteristic of cancer and its treatment. How and how much you exercise while undergoing cancer treatment depends upon you, your condition, treatment protocols and your doctor. You may need to take special care to monitor issues like blood counts, hydration or new or unexplained symptoms.
Exercise for some cancer patients can carry a slightly higher risk for heart problems. You’ll likely need to adjust your intensity — at least at first. You’ll have to adapt. For example, older cancer patients with impacted bones or problems like arthritis or peripheral neuropathy (numbness in hands or feet) should only do exercises with minimal risk of falling or injury. Patients undergoing radiation should not expose treated skin to excessive sunlight or chlorine in swimming pools.
Regular exercise boosts cancer survivorship. One study, for example, found that women diagnosed with breast cancer who exercised moderately (the equivalent of walking three to five hours per week at an average pace) had better survival rates than comparable sedentary patients. Physical activity has also been shown to help patients cope psychologically with the rigors of their disease and treatment.

 

ucsdcancer:

Exercise and Cancer

For years we’ve known that exercise is an important part of a healthy lifestyle by keeping us strong and reducing the risk of heart disease and diabetes. It releases endorphins that make us feel better, physically and mentally – even if when we’re huffing and puffing we’re feeling a little tired.

We also know that physical activity is associated with reduced risk of colon, breast, uterine, lung and prostate cancers. But having cancer doesn’t change the equation. Indeed, for patients diagnosed with and treated for cancer, a life of regular physical activity can become even more critical to having a life with quality.

Physical activity is a critical component of energy balance, a term researchers use to describe how weight, diet and physical activity influence health. Indeed, researchers at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center are currently conducting a pair of studies to assess the effects of healthy diets and exercise programs on women at risk of breast cancer and breast cancer survivors. 

In a seminal series of papers published in 2012 in the journal Lancet, scientists from multiple institutions, including the UC San Diego, concluded that physical inactivity could explain more than 5 million deaths worldwide each year — a number comparable to mortality figures associated with smoking.

“A surprising finding was that inactivity explains 10 percent of deaths from both breast cancer and prostate cancer,” said Jim Sallis, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine and director of the Active Living Research program at UC San Diego. “Thus physical inactivity is a major contributor to common cancers of men and women.”

Regular exercise prevents obesity, which increases a person’s risk of a host of different cancers. It helps reduce inflammation, also linked to cancer, while boosting the body’s immune system function, which helps prevent cancer.

How much exercise do you need?The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention broadly recommends adults engage in “moderate-intensity physical activity for at least 150 minutes per week” (about 30 minutes per day) or “vigorous-intensity” exercise for at least 75 minutes per week. The former is defined as activities like walking briskly, dancing or riding a bike on flat terrain. The latter refers to stuff like race-walking, high-impact aerobics, robustly climbing stairs or participating in fast-moving sports like basketball or soccer.

The best time to begin a lifelong anti-cancer exercise program is today, right now. Once you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, the best time is still today, right now. Often, patients become sedentary after a cancer diagnosis and treatment. They’re going through or have been through a lot. It might seem too much to launch into an exercise regimen. People tend to slow down.

Don’t.

As contrary as it may seem, physical activity is the most effective long-term solution to fatigue, a common characteristic of cancer and its treatment. How and how much you exercise while undergoing cancer treatment depends upon you, your condition, treatment protocols and your doctor. You may need to take special care to monitor issues like blood counts, hydration or new or unexplained symptoms.

Exercise for some cancer patients can carry a slightly higher risk for heart problems. You’ll likely need to adjust your intensity — at least at first. You’ll have to adapt. For example, older cancer patients with impacted bones or problems like arthritis or peripheral neuropathy (numbness in hands or feet) should only do exercises with minimal risk of falling or injury. Patients undergoing radiation should not expose treated skin to excessive sunlight or chlorine in swimming pools.

Regular exercise boosts cancer survivorship. One study, for example, found that women diagnosed with breast cancer who exercised moderately (the equivalent of walking three to five hours per week at an average pace) had better survival rates than comparable sedentary patients. Physical activity has also been shown to help patients cope psychologically with the rigors of their disease and treatment.

 

slcohealth:

Campylobacteriosis is a bacterial infection that causes diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, headache, nausea and vomiting. Illness can last for up to a week or more and can be serious, especially for young children, pregnant women, the elderly, and those who have weakened or compromised immune systems. Raw milk contaminated with disease-causing bacteria does not smell or look any different from uncontaminated raw milk, and there is no easy way for the consumer to know whether the raw milk is contaminated.
 

slcohealth:

Campylobacteriosis is a bacterial infection that causes diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, headache, nausea and vomiting. Illness can last for up to a week or more and can be serious, especially for young children, pregnant women, the elderly, and those who have weakened or compromised immune systems. Raw milk contaminated with disease-causing bacteria does not smell or look any different from uncontaminated raw milk, and there is no easy way for the consumer to know whether the raw milk is contaminated.

 

guardian:

More people have access to mobile phones than to bog-standard sanitation around the world.

The numbers are actually quite close – both are around the 4.5bn mark. But the implications are clear: we value a text, a tweet over one of our most basic sanitary needs: the loo. 

unicef:

It’s the most humanitarian aid we’ve ever sent by air in a single month. And we won’t stop - as long as children are in need we will continue to carry out these urgent supply missions.On our blog, Supply Division Director Shanelle Hall explains what’s going where in August 2014: http://uni.cf/1qKgu9A

unicef:

It’s the most humanitarian aid we’ve ever sent by air in a single month. And we won’t stop - as long as children are in need we will continue to carry out these urgent supply missions.

On our blog, Supply Division Director Shanelle Hall explains what’s going where in August 2014: http://uni.cf/1qKgu9A

More than a quarter-million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used e-cigarettes in 2013
Study finds youth who have used e-cigarettes are almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes 
More than a quarter of a million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used electronic cigarettes in 2013, according to a CDC study published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research.  This number reflects a three-fold increase, from about 79,000 in 2011, to more than 263,000 in 2013.
The data, which comes from the 2011, 2012, and 2013 National Youth Tobacco surveys of middle and high school students, show that youth who had never smoked conventional cigarettes but who used e-cigarettes were almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes as those who had never used e-cigarettes.  Among non-smoking youth who had ever used e-cigarettes, 43.9 percent said they intended to smoke conventional cigarettes within the next year, compared with 21.5 percent of those who had never used e-cigarettes.
“We are very concerned about nicotine use among our youth, regardless of whether it comes from conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes or other tobacco products.  Not only is nicotine highly addictive, it can harm adolescent brain development.” said Tim McAfee, M.D., M.P.H., Director of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health.
There is evidence that nicotine’s adverse effects on adolescent brain development could result in lasting deficits in cognitive function.  Nicotine is highly addictive.  About three out of every four teen smokers become adult smokers, even if they intend to quit in a few years.
(More from CDC)

More than a quarter-million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used e-cigarettes in 2013

Study finds youth who have used e-cigarettes are almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes

More than a quarter of a million youth who had never smoked a cigarette used electronic cigarettes in 2013, according to a CDC study published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research.  This number reflects a three-fold increase, from about 79,000 in 2011, to more than 263,000 in 2013.

The data, which comes from the 2011, 2012, and 2013 National Youth Tobacco surveys of middle and high school students, show that youth who had never smoked conventional cigarettes but who used e-cigarettes were almost twice as likely to intend to smoke conventional cigarettes as those who had never used e-cigarettes.  Among non-smoking youth who had ever used e-cigarettes, 43.9 percent said they intended to smoke conventional cigarettes within the next year, compared with 21.5 percent of those who had never used e-cigarettes.

“We are very concerned about nicotine use among our youth, regardless of whether it comes from conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes or other tobacco products.  Not only is nicotine highly addictive, it can harm adolescent brain development.” said Tim McAfee, M.D., M.P.H., Director of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health.

There is evidence that nicotine’s adverse effects on adolescent brain development could result in lasting deficits in cognitive function.  Nicotine is highly addictive.  About three out of every four teen smokers become adult smokers, even if they intend to quit in a few years.

(More from CDC)

byebyethinspo:

Shoutout to the Brattleboro Retreat’s “Stand Up to Stigma” campaign for mental health awareness!

npr:

Ebola has a nasty reputation for damaging the body, especially its blood vessels. But when you look at the nitty-gritty details of what happens after a person is infected, a surprising fact surfaces.
How Ebola Kills You: It’s Not The Virus
Illustration credit: Lisa Brown for NPR

npr:

Ebola has a nasty reputation for damaging the body, especially its blood vessels. But when you look at the nitty-gritty details of what happens after a person is infected, a surprising fact surfaces.

How Ebola Kills You: It’s Not The Virus

Illustration credit: Lisa Brown for NPR

ucsdhealthsciences:

Close Nit
With Labor Day looming and the beginning of school, many of the academically minded among us turn their thoughts and eyes to topics like classroom supplies, textbooks and the likelihood little Johnny is going to come home with head lice.
It’s hard to know how many people get head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) each year. The Centers for Disease Control estimates 6 to 12 million infestations annually in the United States among children three to 11 years of age – the most common targets.
Getting head lice is not a matter of cleanliness. The wingless parasitic insect is spread primarily by direct contact with the hair of an infested person. The most common way is head-to-head contact. Some studies suggest girls get head lice more often than boys.
Less common modes of transmission are wearing infested clothing, such as hats or scarves, using infested combs, brushes or towels or lying on a bed, couch, pillow or carpet recently in contact with an infested person.
Head lice are not known to transmit disease, but secondary bacterial skin infections may occur from scratching the infestation site. Some folks argue that beyond their basic harmlessness, head lice might actually promote health by boosting a natural immune response to body lice (Pediculus humanus humanus), which pose a more serious health threat.
Head lice spend their entire lives on human scalps, clamped onto a strand of hair, feeding exclusively on human blood. There are other species of lice that infest other mammals and birds.
Treatment involves the use of pediculicides – medicines that kill lice and their eggs. Supplemental measures include thorough cleaning of all clothes and exposed materials and grooming with a special, fine-toothed comb to extract adults and eggs, called nits.
Above: A colorized scanning electron micrograph of a nit (green) affixed to a strand of human hair, courtesy of Kevin Mackenzie, one of the winners of this year’s Wellcome Image Awards.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Close Nit

With Labor Day looming and the beginning of school, many of the academically minded among us turn their thoughts and eyes to topics like classroom supplies, textbooks and the likelihood little Johnny is going to come home with head lice.

It’s hard to know how many people get head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) each year. The Centers for Disease Control estimates 6 to 12 million infestations annually in the United States among children three to 11 years of age – the most common targets.

Getting head lice is not a matter of cleanliness. The wingless parasitic insect is spread primarily by direct contact with the hair of an infested person. The most common way is head-to-head contact. Some studies suggest girls get head lice more often than boys.

Less common modes of transmission are wearing infested clothing, such as hats or scarves, using infested combs, brushes or towels or lying on a bed, couch, pillow or carpet recently in contact with an infested person.

Head lice are not known to transmit disease, but secondary bacterial skin infections may occur from scratching the infestation site. Some folks argue that beyond their basic harmlessness, head lice might actually promote health by boosting a natural immune response to body lice (Pediculus humanus humanus), which pose a more serious health threat.

Head lice spend their entire lives on human scalps, clamped onto a strand of hair, feeding exclusively on human blood. There are other species of lice that infest other mammals and birds.

Treatment involves the use of pediculicides – medicines that kill lice and their eggs. Supplemental measures include thorough cleaning of all clothes and exposed materials and grooming with a special, fine-toothed comb to extract adults and eggs, called nits.

Above: A colorized scanning electron micrograph of a nit (green) affixed to a strand of human hair, courtesy of Kevin Mackenzie, one of the winners of this year’s Wellcome Image Awards.