Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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First Imported Case of Ebola Diagnosed in the United States


CDC confirmed on September 30, 2014, through laboratory tests, the first case of Ebola to be diagnosed in the United States in a person who had traveled to Dallas, Texas from West Africa. The patient did not have symptoms when leaving West Africa, but developed symptoms approximately five days after arriving in the United States.
The person sought medical care at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas after developing symptoms consistent with Ebola. Based on the person’s travel history and symptoms, CDC recommended testing for Ebola. The medical facility isolated the patient and sent specimens for testing at CDC and at a Texas lab participating in CDC’s Laboratory Response Network. CDC and the Texas Health Department reported the laboratory test results to the medical center to inform the patient. Local public health officials have begun identifying close contacts of the person for further daily monitoring for 21 days after exposure.
The ill person did not exhibit symptoms of Ebola during the flights from West Africa and CDC does not recommend that people on the same commercial airline flights undergo monitoring, as Ebola is only contagious if the person is experiencing active symptoms. The person reported developing symptoms several days after the return flight.
CDC recognizes that even a single case of Ebola diagnosed in the United States raises concerns. Knowing the possibility exists, medical and public health professionals across the country have been preparing to respond. CDC and public health officials in Texas are taking precautions to identify people who have had close personal contact with the ill person and health care professionals have been reminded to use meticulous infection control at all times.
We know how to stop Ebola’s further spread: thorough case finding, isolation of ill people, contacting people exposed to the ill person, and further isolation of contacts if they develop symptoms. The U.S. public health and medical systems have had prior experience with sporadic cases of diseases such as Ebola. In the past decade, the United States had 5 imported cases of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) diseases similar to Ebola (1 Marburg, 4 Lassa). None resulted in any transmission in the United States.
(From CDC)

First Imported Case of Ebola Diagnosed in the United States

CDC confirmed on September 30, 2014, through laboratory tests, the first case of Ebola to be diagnosed in the United States in a person who had traveled to Dallas, Texas from West Africa. The patient did not have symptoms when leaving West Africa, but developed symptoms approximately five days after arriving in the United States.

The person sought medical care at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas after developing symptoms consistent with Ebola. Based on the person’s travel history and symptoms, CDC recommended testing for Ebola. The medical facility isolated the patient and sent specimens for testing at CDC and at a Texas lab participating in CDC’s Laboratory Response Network. CDC and the Texas Health Department reported the laboratory test results to the medical center to inform the patient. Local public health officials have begun identifying close contacts of the person for further daily monitoring for 21 days after exposure.

The ill person did not exhibit symptoms of Ebola during the flights from West Africa and CDC does not recommend that people on the same commercial airline flights undergo monitoring, as Ebola is only contagious if the person is experiencing active symptoms. The person reported developing symptoms several days after the return flight.

CDC recognizes that even a single case of Ebola diagnosed in the United States raises concerns. Knowing the possibility exists, medical and public health professionals across the country have been preparing to respond. CDC and public health officials in Texas are taking precautions to identify people who have had close personal contact with the ill person and health care professionals have been reminded to use meticulous infection control at all times.

We know how to stop Ebola’s further spread: thorough case finding, isolation of ill people, contacting people exposed to the ill person, and further isolation of contacts if they develop symptoms. The U.S. public health and medical systems have had prior experience with sporadic cases of diseases such as Ebola. In the past decade, the United States had 5 imported cases of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) diseases similar to Ebola (1 Marburg, 4 Lassa). None resulted in any transmission in the United States.

(From CDC)

nprglobalhealth:

Even When Abortion Is Illegal, The Market May Sell Pills For Abortion
In the central market in San Salvador, you can buy just about anything you want: tomatoes by the wheelbarrow full. Fresh goat’s milk straight from the goat. Underwear. Plumbing supplies. Fruit. Hollywood’s latest blockbusters burned straight onto a DVD.
And in the back of the market, in a small stall lined with jars of dried herbs, roots and mushrooms, you can buy an abortion.
"I have all types of plants to treat all kinds of diseases," the woman who runs the shop says through a translator. "For example, problems with your liver, your kidneys, stomach problems, nerves, for cancer — for everything."
She says she also has a bitter tea that can take care of an unwanted pregnancy.
Abortion is completely banned in El Salvador and punishable with a prison term of anywhere from two to 50 years in prison. So this woman asks that we not use her name.
Her tea only works, she says, in the first six weeks of pregnancy. If a woman is seeking an abortion later than that, the herbalist arranges to get something far stronger from a local pharmacy: pills used to treat stomach ulcers that are sold generically as misoprostol.
"They come asking for help," the woman says. "The majority of them are minors — young girls who say they were raped by their stepfathers or by people a lot older than they are."
Continue reading.
Photo: In the markets of San Salvador, El Salvador, you can have your palm read, you can buy plumbing tools … and you can purchase abortion pills. (John Poole/NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

Even When Abortion Is Illegal, The Market May Sell Pills For Abortion

In the central market in San Salvador, you can buy just about anything you want: tomatoes by the wheelbarrow full. Fresh goat’s milk straight from the goat. Underwear. Plumbing supplies. Fruit. Hollywood’s latest blockbusters burned straight onto a DVD.

And in the back of the market, in a small stall lined with jars of dried herbs, roots and mushrooms, you can buy an abortion.

"I have all types of plants to treat all kinds of diseases," the woman who runs the shop says through a translator. "For example, problems with your liver, your kidneys, stomach problems, nerves, for cancer — for everything."

She says she also has a bitter tea that can take care of an unwanted pregnancy.

Abortion is completely banned in El Salvador and punishable with a prison term of anywhere from two to 50 years in prison. So this woman asks that we not use her name.

Her tea only works, she says, in the first six weeks of pregnancy. If a woman is seeking an abortion later than that, the herbalist arranges to get something far stronger from a local pharmacy: pills used to treat stomach ulcers that are sold generically as misoprostol.

"They come asking for help," the woman says. "The majority of them are minors — young girls who say they were raped by their stepfathers or by people a lot older than they are."

Continue reading.

Photo: In the markets of San Salvador, El Salvador, you can have your palm read, you can buy plumbing tools … and you can purchase abortion pills. (John Poole/NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

Grieving But Grateful, Ebola Survivors In Liberia Give Back
Harrison Sakilla, a 39-year-old former teacher, can’t stop smiling.
"I have to smile," he says. "I’m the first survivor for the case management center here from Ebola."
Former patients like Sakilla, who’ve recovered from the virus, lift the collective spirit at at the Doctors Without Borders Ebola center in Liberia’s northern town of Foya. He was admitted to the high-risk isolation unit, which is part of a cluster of large tents that make up the bulk of the center.
While health workers busy themselves caring for patients on one side — with all the stress, hard work, death and sorrow that entails – there’s an oasis of joy and relief on the other side, where a few brick buildings stand to the right.
That’s where Ebola survivors congregate.
But their smiles may mask deep sorrow. “I’m very fine, even though I’ve lost seven [family members],” says Sakilla.
He starts to list them: “My father, my mother, my sister, my niece, my big brother and my niece’s daughter,” he says. “But right now I’m alive, I’m very, very, very happy. You see me smiling — nothing but smiling.”
Sakilla and other survivors gather together in their own little center, beyond the pop-up tents. Several are helping Doctors Without Borders, looking after orphaned children and performing other tasks.
Continue reading.
Photo: Bendu Borlay, 21 and an Ebola survivor, is caring for an infant whose mother died of the disease. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

Grieving But Grateful, Ebola Survivors In Liberia Give Back

Harrison Sakilla, a 39-year-old former teacher, can’t stop smiling.

"I have to smile," he says. "I’m the first survivor for the case management center here from Ebola."

Former patients like Sakilla, who’ve recovered from the virus, lift the collective spirit at at the Doctors Without Borders Ebola center in Liberia’s northern town of Foya. He was admitted to the high-risk isolation unit, which is part of a cluster of large tents that make up the bulk of the center.

While health workers busy themselves caring for patients on one side — with all the stress, hard work, death and sorrow that entails – there’s an oasis of joy and relief on the other side, where a few brick buildings stand to the right.

That’s where Ebola survivors congregate.

But their smiles may mask deep sorrow. “I’m very fine, even though I’ve lost seven [family members],” says Sakilla.

He starts to list them: “My father, my mother, my sister, my niece, my big brother and my niece’s daughter,” he says. “But right now I’m alive, I’m very, very, very happy. You see me smiling — nothing but smiling.”

Sakilla and other survivors gather together in their own little center, beyond the pop-up tents. Several are helping Doctors Without Borders, looking after orphaned children and performing other tasks.

Continue reading.

Photo: Bendu Borlay, 21 and an Ebola survivor, is caring for an infant whose mother died of the disease. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

Why Public Health? Jennifer Atlas

(From Harvard School of Public Health)

(From Bloomberg Philantropies)
(Click on graphic for more resolution)

(From Bloomberg Philantropies)

(Click on graphic for more resolution)

World Rabies Day
World Rabies Day is September 28. On this day, begin to take steps to keep yourself and your family free from rabies. Look for events in your area that provide an opportunity to celebrate World Rabies Day and get the facts on rabies prevention and control.
Rabies is a deadly virus that can kill anyone who gets it. Every year, an estimated 40,000 people in the U.S. receive a series of shots known as post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) due to potential exposure to rabies. In addition, the U.S. public health cost associated with rabies is more than $300 million a year. Each year around the world, rabies results in more than 55,000 deaths – approximately one death every 10 minutes. Most deaths are reported from Africa and Asia with almost 50% of the victims being children under the age of 15.


The U.S. has been successful in eliminating canine rabies. Take steps to control rabies in your pets!


The Challenge of Rabies
Rabies is present on every inhabited continent. People usually get rabies when they are bitten by an animal that has the virus. In the U.S., the animals that most often get rabies are wild animals. Fortunately, the U.S. has been successful in eliminating a particular kind of rabies – known as canine rabies – that is responsible for rabies spreading from dog-to-dog.
However, canine rabies has not been controlled in many regions of the world, further threatening the health of humans and animals in these areas. In addition, some areas of the world have problems with large numbers of stray dogs, which can often come in contact with wild animals that have rabies. This often causes an increased number of rabid animals that have the potential to transmit the virus to humans.
The good news is that people can easily take steps to help prevent and control rabies.
(From CDC)
(Picture from Global Alliance for Rabies Control)

World Rabies Day

World Rabies Day is September 28. On this day, begin to take steps to keep yourself and your family free from rabies. Look for events in your area that provide an opportunity to celebrate World Rabies Day and get the facts on rabies prevention and control.

Rabies is a deadly virus that can kill anyone who gets it. Every year, an estimated 40,000 people in the U.S. receive a series of shots known as post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) due to potential exposure to rabies. In addition, the U.S. public health cost associated with rabies is more than $300 million a year. Each year around the world, rabies results in more than 55,000 deaths – approximately one death every 10 minutes. Most deaths are reported from Africa and Asia with almost 50% of the victims being children under the age of 15.

Boy and dog riding in car

The U.S. has been successful in eliminating canine rabies. Take steps to control rabies in your pets!

The Challenge of Rabies

Rabies is present on every inhabited continent. People usually get rabies when they are bitten by an animal that has the virus. In the U.S., the animals that most often get rabies are wild animals. Fortunately, the U.S. has been successful in eliminating a particular kind of rabies – known as canine rabies – that is responsible for rabies spreading from dog-to-dog.

However, canine rabies has not been controlled in many regions of the world, further threatening the health of humans and animals in these areas. In addition, some areas of the world have problems with large numbers of stray dogs, which can often come in contact with wild animals that have rabies. This often causes an increased number of rabid animals that have the potential to transmit the virus to humans.

The good news is that people can easily take steps to help prevent and control rabies.

(From CDC)

(Picture from Global Alliance for Rabies Control)

Activists, celebrities and policy makers from around the world show their support for climate action in this UN Climate Summit video.

Climate Summit 2014 website: 
http://www.un.org/climatechange/summit/

From Bloomberg Philantropies via Twitter
Increased access to comprehensive reproductive health services saves lives bloombg.org/1CtgFhD

From Bloomberg Philantropies via Twitter

Increased access to comprehensive reproductive health services saves lives bloombg.org/1CtgFhD

From UK’s Office for National Statistics (Click on image for more resolution)

From UK’s Office for National Statistics (Click on image for more resolution)