Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget.
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(From the American Association for Cancer Research, AARC)
by UNICEF.

(From UNICEF)

Acting Surgeon General, Rear Admiral Boris Lushniak discusses the Tobacco-Free College Campus Initiative, and welcomes you and your campus to lead by example in the fight against tobacco!

gov-info:

HHS NIH Gov Doc: Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS)/Study of Latinos (SOL)
The Hispanic Community Health Study is a comprehensive health and lifestyle analysis of people from a range of Hispanic/Latino origins shows that this segment of the U.S. population is diverse, not only in ancestry, culture, and economic status, but also in the prevalence of several diseases, risk factors, and lifestyle habits.
These health data are derived from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), led by the NIH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), a landmark study that enrolled about 16,415 Hispanic/Latino adults living in San Diego, Chicago, Miami, and the Bronx, N.Y., who self-identified with Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or South American origins. These new findings have been compiled and published as the Hispanic Community Health Study Data Book: A Report to the Communities. The full report is available in English and Spanish.

gov-info:

HHS NIH Gov Doc: Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS)/Study of Latinos (SOL)

The Hispanic Community Health Study is a comprehensive health and lifestyle analysis of people from a range of Hispanic/Latino origins shows that this segment of the U.S. population is diverse, not only in ancestry, culture, and economic status, but also in the prevalence of several diseases, risk factors, and lifestyle habits.

These health data are derived from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), led by the NIH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), a landmark study that enrolled about 16,415 Hispanic/Latino adults living in San Diego, Chicago, Miami, and the Bronx, N.Y., who self-identified with Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or South American origins. These new findings have been compiled and published as the Hispanic Community Health Study Data Book: A Report to the Communities. The full report is available in English and Spanish.

Twelve Ways to Reduce Your Cancer Risk
1. Do not smoke. Do not use any form of tobacco. 
2. Make your home smoke free. Support smoke-free policies in your workplace. 
3. Take action to be a healthy body weight. 
4. Be physically active in everyday life. Limit the time you spend sitting. 
5. Have a healthy diet: 
Eat plenty of whole grains, pulses, vegetables and fruits. 
Limit high-calorie foods (foods high in sugar or fat) and avoid sugary drinks. 
Avoid processed meat; limit red meat and foods high in salt. 
6. If you drink alcohol of any type, limit your intake. Not drinking alcohol is better for cancer prevention. 
7. Avoid too much sun, especially for children. Use sun protection. Do not use sunbeds. 
8. In the workplace, protect yourself against cancer-causing substances by following health and safety instructions. 
9. Find out if you are exposed to radiation from naturally high radon levels in your home. Take action to reduce high radon levels. 
10 For women: 
Breastfeeding reduces the mother’s cancer risk. If you can, breastfeed your baby. 
Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases the risk of certain cancers. Limit use of HRT. 
11. Ensure your children take part in vaccination programmes for: 
Hepatitis B (for newborns) 
Human papillomavirus (HPV) (for girls). 
12. Take part in organized cancer screening programmes for: 
Bowel cancer (men and women) 
Breast cancer (women) 
Cervical cancer (women). 
(From the International Agency for Research on Cancer, IARC, and the European Commission)

Twelve Ways to Reduce Your Cancer Risk

1. Do not smoke. Do not use any form of tobacco. 

2. Make your home smoke free. Support smoke-free policies in your workplace. 

3. Take action to be a healthy body weight. 

4. Be physically active in everyday life. Limit the time you spend sitting. 

5. Have a healthy diet: 

  • Eat plenty of whole grains, pulses, vegetables and fruits. 
  • Limit high-calorie foods (foods high in sugar or fat) and avoid sugary drinks. 
  • Avoid processed meat; limit red meat and foods high in salt. 

6. If you drink alcohol of any type, limit your intake. Not drinking alcohol is better for cancer prevention. 

7. Avoid too much sun, especially for children. Use sun protection. Do not use sunbeds. 

8. In the workplace, protect yourself against cancer-causing substances by following health and safety instructions. 

9. Find out if you are exposed to radiation from naturally high radon levels in your home. Take action to reduce high radon levels. 

10 For women: 

  • Breastfeeding reduces the mother’s cancer risk. If you can, breastfeed your baby. 
  • Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases the risk of certain cancers. Limit use of HRT. 

11. Ensure your children take part in vaccination programmes for: 

  • Hepatitis B (for newborns) 
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) (for girls). 

12. Take part in organized cancer screening programmes for: 

  • Bowel cancer (men and women) 
  • Breast cancer (women) 
  • Cervical cancer (women). 

(From the International Agency for Research on Cancer, IARC, and the European Commission)

The Exercise Cost of Soda and Juice
When people think about sugar calories in terms of physical activity, they choose well.

By James Hamblin 

What if nutrition labels told people exactly what calories meant, in practical terms? A bottle of Coke could dole out specific exercise requirements. The calories herein, it might say, are the equivalent of a 50-minute jog. The decision to drink the Coke then becomes, would you rather spend the evening on a treadmill, or just not drink the soda?
Some would say that’s a joyless, infantilizing idea. The implication that people can’t understand calorie counts is unduly cynical. Have a Coke and a smile, not a Coke and a guilt-wail. Others would protest on grounds that it’s impossible to make this kind of exercise requirement universal to people of all ages, body sizes, and levels of fitness. Everyone burns calories at different rates. But Sara Bleich, an associate professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, is not among these people. She describes these labels as her dream.

For the past four years, translating nutrition information into exercise equivalents has been the focus of Bleich’s increasingly popular research endeavor. Her latest findings on the effectiveness of the concept are published today in the American Journal of Public Health. In the study, researchers posted signs next to the soda and juice in Baltimore corner stores that read: “Did you know that working off a bottle of soda or fruit juice takes about 50 minutes of running?” or “Did you know that working off a bottle of soda or fruit juice takes about five miles of walking?” (And, long as those distances and times may seem, they may even underestimate the magnitude of the metabolic insult of liquid sugar.)
The signs were a proxy for an actual food label, but they made the point. They effectively led to fewer juice and soda purchases, and to purchases of smaller sizes (12-ounce cans instead of 20-ounce bottles). Bleich also saw learned behavior; even after the signs came down, the local patrons continued to buy less soda and juice.
"The problem with calories is that they’re not very meaningful to people," Bleich told me. "The average American doesn’t know much about calories, and they’re not good at numeracy."
(More from The Atlantic)

The Exercise Cost of Soda and Juice

When people think about sugar calories in terms of physical activity, they choose well.

usatoday:

If you or someone you know needs help, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255.

Learn more in our series Mental Illness: The Cost of Not Caring

(From FDA-Office of Women’s Health)
(Click on image for better resolution)

(From FDA-Office of Women’s Health)

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nychealthyneighborhoods:

Click HERE or call 311 for more information about Ebola. 

nychealthyneighborhoods:

Click HERE or call 311 for more information about Ebola. 

christinechronicles:

A new interactive by BMJ reveals medical and social impacts of teenage pregnancy: http://t.co/eHxjbeuABD http://t.co/gWZkVuVDeR

christinechronicles:

A new interactive by BMJ reveals medical and social impacts of teenage pregnancy: http://t.co/eHxjbeuABD http://t.co/gWZkVuVDeR