nychealth
nychealth:

The cost of a pack of cigarettes in NYC can reach nearly $15 a pack.
How much money will you save when you quit?
Check out our Quit Calculator to find out how much you would save over time if you quit today.

In addition to saving money, learn more about the health benefits of quitting smoking, which begin in as little as just 20 minutes after your last cigarette.

nychealth:

The cost of a pack of cigarettes in NYC can reach nearly $15 a pack.

How much money will you save when you quit?

Check out our Quit Calculator to find out how much you would save over time if you quit today.

In addition to saving money, learn more about the health benefits of quitting smoking, which begin in as little as just 20 minutes after your last cigarette.

necessaryhealth
necessaryhealth:

INFOGRAPHIC: GLOBAL BURDEN OF DISEASE

Harvard University

Infographics

The past two decades have seen major progress in global health, according to the latest Global Burden of Disease study—an ambitious worldwide project involving Harvard School of Public Health faculty and many others. While life expectancy has risen, however, the burden of disease has shifted, as people are living longer and getting sicker more often. Our graphic with Harvard School of Public Health details where we’ve come and what still must be done.

necessaryhealth:

INFOGRAPHIC: GLOBAL BURDEN OF DISEASE

Harvard University

Infographics

The past two decades have seen major progress in global health, according to the latest Global Burden of Disease study—an ambitious worldwide project involving Harvard School of Public Health faculty and many others. While life expectancy has risen, however, the burden of disease has shifted, as people are living longer and getting sicker more often. Our graphic with Harvard School of Public Health details where we’ve come and what still must be done.

nychealth
nychealth:

Noise in NYC
Big cities like NYC are full of great sights, sounds …  and noises.
Ambient noise is the noise from traffic, construction, industrial or recreation activities, animals, or people’s voices, that someone doesn’t want to hear. Too much ambient noise can cause stress, higher blood pressure, and interference with sleep.
To gain a better understanding of ambient noise disturbance among all New Yorkers, a recent Community Health Survey asked adults about how often they were disrupted by noise within the previous three months and why. Here’s what we learned:
4 in 10 New Yorkers reported having activities disrupted by noise from outside their homes at least once in the previous 3 months. 
3 in 4 of New Yorkers experiencing frequent noise disruptions —about 828,000 New Yorkers—reported noise disruption 7 or more times per week.
More than half of all those reporting any noise disruption said they were disturbed by noise coming from traffic – noise from cars, trucks, or other vehicles, excluding emergency sirens – and about half said neighbors and emergency sirens caused their noise disruption.

 
NYC also tracks noise complaints through its 311 calling system. Of the 1,783,133 complaints to the 311 call system in 2009:
111,730 (6%) of 311 calls were noise-related.
More than half of 311 noise complaints were related to noise from loud music and parties (34%) or other social environment causes (24%) such as noise from neighbors, loud talking, loud TV, alarms going off, ice cream trucks, or noise from ventilation units.
1 out of 5 noise calls to 311 were to complain about traffic or transportation noise.
311 complaint data show that residents of Manhattan disproportionally called about noise-related complaints in 2009.
Central Harlem-Morningside Heights, Chelsea-Village, and Union Square-Lower Manhattan were among the top five communities with the highest 311 noise-related calls rates as well as the highest prevalence of noise disruption, as reported to the Community Health Survey.




Want to learn more? Check out our new report for more NYC noise facts.

nychealth:

Noise in NYC

Big cities like NYC are full of great sights, sounds …  and noises.

Ambient noise is the noise from traffic, construction, industrial or recreation activities, animals, or people’s voices, that someone doesn’t want to hear. Too much ambient noise can cause stress, higher blood pressure, and interference with sleep.

To gain a better understanding of ambient noise disturbance among all New Yorkers, a recent Community Health Survey asked adults about how often they were disrupted by noise within the previous three months and why. Here’s what we learned:

  • 4 in 10 New Yorkers reported having activities disrupted by noise from outside their homes at least once in the previous 3 months.
  • 3 in 4 of New Yorkers experiencing frequent noise disruptions —about 828,000 New Yorkers—reported noise disruption 7 or more times per week.
  • More than half of all those reporting any noise disruption said they were disturbed by noise coming from traffic – noise from cars, trucks, or other vehicles, excluding emergency sirens – and about half said neighbors and emergency sirens caused their noise disruption.

 

NYC also tracks noise complaints through its 311 calling system. Of the 1,783,133 complaints to the 311 call system in 2009:

  • 111,730 (6%) of 311 calls were noise-related.
  • More than half of 311 noise complaints were related to noise from loud music and parties (34%) or other social environment causes (24%) such as noise from neighbors, loud talking, loud TV, alarms going off, ice cream trucks, or noise from ventilation units.
  • 1 out of 5 noise calls to 311 were to complain about traffic or transportation noise.
  • 311 complaint data show that residents of Manhattan disproportionally called about noise-related complaints in 2009.
  • Central Harlem-Morningside Heights, Chelsea-Village, and Union Square-Lower Manhattan were among the top five communities with the highest 311 noise-related calls rates as well as the highest prevalence of noise disruption, as reported to the Community Health Survey.

Want to learn more? Check out our new report for more NYC noise facts.

gov-info
gov-info:

REFERENCE: NLM Gov Docs: Resources for National Minority Health Month
April is National Minority Health Month. This year’s theme, “Prevention is Power: Taking Action for Health Equity” emphasizes the critical role of prevention in reducing health disparities.
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has several free health information resources that support eliminating minority health disparities. These resources include multicultural health Web sites, minority health information handouts, and HIV/AIDS information and funding:
NLM Asian American Health Web Portal
NLM American Indian Health Web Portal
NLM Arctic Health Web Portal
NLM HIV/AIDS Information: African Americans
NLM HIV/AIDS Information: Hispanics/Latinos
NLM Minority Health Information Handouts
NLM AIDS Community Information Outreach Projects
NLM MedlinePlus “Health Disparities” Health Topic
Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN)
And, funded in part by the NN/LM Pacific Northwest Region, Seattle’s Harborview Medical Center provides the EthnoMed website, specializing in medical and cultural information about immigrant and refugee groups specific to the Puget Sound area.
EthnoMed: Integrating Cultural Information Into Clinical Practice
via nnlm Dragonfly blog

gov-info:

REFERENCE: NLM Gov Docs: Resources for National Minority Health Month

April is National Minority Health Month. This year’s theme, “Prevention is Power: Taking Action for Health Equity” emphasizes the critical role of prevention in reducing health disparities.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has several free health information resources that support eliminating minority health disparities. These resources include multicultural health Web sites, minority health information handouts, and HIV/AIDS information and funding:

NLM Asian American Health Web Portal

NLM American Indian Health Web Portal

NLM Arctic Health Web Portal

NLM HIV/AIDS Information: African Americans

NLM HIV/AIDS Information: Hispanics/Latinos

NLM Minority Health Information Handouts

NLM AIDS Community Information Outreach Projects

NLM MedlinePlus “Health Disparities” Health Topic

Refugee Health Information Network (RHIN)

And, funded in part by the NN/LM Pacific Northwest Region, Seattle’s Harborview Medical Center provides the EthnoMed website, specializing in medical and cultural information about immigrant and refugee groups specific to the Puget Sound area.

EthnoMed: Integrating Cultural Information Into Clinical Practice

via nnlm Dragonfly blog

ucsdcancer
ucsdcancer:

From our sister blog, questions with one of our experts on what’s known about e-cigarette safety. Although e-cigarettes do not have all the known carcinogens of traditional cigarettes, not enough is known to call them a “safer” alternative. Read more.
ucsdhealthsciences:

To Vape or Not to Vape? We’ve got thee questions for our expert about the supposed safety of e-cigarettes
For the last 50 years cigarette smoking has been on the decline due in large part to aggressive advocacy by health professionals about the risks associated with smoking tobacco, and a once ubiquitous habit has become taboo. Quickly replacing tobacco cigarettes are electronic or e-cigarettes and “vaping” is the new inhaling. E-cigarette availability and popularity are at an all-time high, especially among teens and young adults, with claims of e-cigarette safety driving the trend.
But are e-cigarettes really safe? Recent reports of liquid nicotine poisoning beg to differ and much remains unknown about whether or not inhaling the vapor from e-cigarettes is safer than inhaling smoked tobacco.
We’ve asked John Pierce, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine, Moores Cancer Center director for population sciences and expert on tobacco cessation three questions about the relative safety of e-cigarettes.
Question: What, if anything, is known about the health effects of nicotine delivery from e-cigarettes versus traditional tobacco cigarettes? Are they, as advocates and tobacco companies suggest, safer?Answer: There is no question that a heavy smoker who stops using cigarettes and switches to e-cigs will have a reduced risk of lung cancer.  However, it is not at all clear that e-cigarettes will not introduce a new health risk to the person who has never smoked or whether it will be a safe alternative for the occasional smoker.
Q: Is there any evidence that it’s easier to quit smoking by shifting to e-cigarettes?
A: No, the evidence that is available suggests that e-cigarettes are not an effective smoking cessation device. The question is how difficult will it be for heavy smokers to substitute e-cigarettes for their regular cigarettes.
Q: How much nicotine from e-cigarettes is released as vapor, potentially to be inhaled by others? Does the vapor represent less of a health threat than secondhand smoke?
A: Plenty. Currently, there is very little standardization in e-cigarettes and lots of potentially harmful chemicals have been measured in it. The first study to report on this did so last December. There is no science that supports allowing e-cigarettes to be used where cigarettes are prohibited.
Image source: The Mercury News

ucsdcancer:

From our sister blog, questions with one of our experts on what’s known about e-cigarette safety. Although e-cigarettes do not have all the known carcinogens of traditional cigarettes, not enough is known to call them a “safer” alternative. Read more.

ucsdhealthsciences:

To Vape or Not to Vape?
We’ve got thee questions for our expert about the supposed safety of e-cigarettes

For the last 50 years cigarette smoking has been on the decline due in large part to aggressive advocacy by health professionals about the risks associated with smoking tobacco, and a once ubiquitous habit has become taboo. Quickly replacing tobacco cigarettes are electronic or e-cigarettes and “vaping” is the new inhaling. E-cigarette availability and popularity are at an all-time high, especially among teens and young adults, with claims of e-cigarette safety driving the trend.

But are e-cigarettes really safe? Recent reports of liquid nicotine poisoning beg to differ and much remains unknown about whether or not inhaling the vapor from e-cigarettes is safer than inhaling smoked tobacco.

We’ve asked John Pierce, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine, Moores Cancer Center director for population sciences and expert on tobacco cessation three questions about the relative safety of e-cigarettes.

Question: What, if anything, is known about the health effects of nicotine delivery from e-cigarettes versus traditional tobacco cigarettes? Are they, as advocates and tobacco companies suggest, safer?

Answer: There is no question that a heavy smoker who stops using cigarettes and switches to e-cigs will have a reduced risk of lung cancer.  However, it is not at all clear that e-cigarettes will not introduce a new health risk to the person who has never smoked or whether it will be a safe alternative for the occasional smoker.

Q: Is there any evidence that it’s easier to quit smoking by shifting to e-cigarettes?

A: No, the evidence that is available suggests that e-cigarettes are not an effective smoking cessation device. The question is how difficult will it be for heavy smokers to substitute e-cigarettes for their regular cigarettes.

Q: How much nicotine from e-cigarettes is released as vapor, potentially to be inhaled by others? Does the vapor represent less of a health threat than secondhand smoke?

A: Plenty. Currently, there is very little standardization in e-cigarettes and lots of potentially harmful chemicals have been measured in it. The first study to report on this did so last December. There is no science that supports allowing e-cigarettes to be used where cigarettes are prohibited.

Image source: The Mercury News