Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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Prostate Cancer: Take Time to Decide
Most prostate cancers grow slowly, and don’t cause any health problems in men who have them. A PSA test may find a prostate health problem. Treatment can cause serious side effects. Take time to ask your doctor these questions before you decide to get tested or treated for prostate cancer.
Who has a higher risk for prostate cancer?
Men who are 50 years old or older.
African-American men.
Men whose father, brother, or son had prostate cancer.
What is the PSA test?
Your prostate makes a substance called prostate-specific antigen (PSA)
The PSA test measures the PSA in your blood.
Your PSA level can be high for many reasons.
What happens next if my PSA is high?
Your doctor may repeat your PSA test.
Your doctor may send you to a specialist (urologist) for more tests, like a biopsy.
Tiny pieces of prostate tissue are removed using small needles and checked for cancer cells. Biopsies are the only way to know if you have prostate cancer.
What are my choices if a biopsy shows early prostate cancer?
Watching it closely.
Get PSA tests and biopsies regularly.
Talk to your doctor if you have symptoms like trouble urinating, blood in your urine, or pain in your back, hips, or pelvis that doesn’t go away.
Getting other treatments after talking to your doctor.
You may talk surgery to remove the prostate, radiation therapy, or hormone therapy.
You may also talk about the side effects of treatment like impotence, loss of bladder control, and bowel problems.

(From CDC)

Prostate Cancer: Take Time to Decide

Most prostate cancers grow slowly, and don’t cause any health problems in men who have them. A PSA test may find a prostate health problem. Treatment can cause serious side effects. Take time to ask your doctor these questions before you decide to get tested or treated for prostate cancer.

Who has a higher risk for prostate cancer?

  • Men who are 50 years old or older.
  • African-American men.
  • Men whose father, brother, or son had prostate cancer.

What is the PSA test?

  • Your prostate makes a substance called prostate-specific antigen (PSA)
  • The PSA test measures the PSA in your blood.
  • Your PSA level can be high for many reasons.

What happens next if my PSA is high?

  • Your doctor may repeat your PSA test.
  • Your doctor may send you to a specialist (urologist) for more tests, like a biopsy.

Tiny pieces of prostate tissue are removed using small needles and checked for cancer cells. Biopsies are the only way to know if you have prostate cancer.

What are my choices if a biopsy shows early prostate cancer?

Watching it closely.

  • Get PSA tests and biopsies regularly.
  • Talk to your doctor if you have symptoms like trouble urinating, blood in your urine, or pain in your back, hips, or pelvis that doesn’t go away.

Getting other treatments after talking to your doctor.

  • You may talk surgery to remove the prostate, radiation therapy, or hormone therapy.
  • You may also talk about the side effects of treatment like impotence, loss of bladder control, and bowel problems.
(From CDC)
The Harms and Benefits of PSA (Prostate-Specific Antigen) Screening for Prostate Cancer.From The National Cancer Institute (NCI)
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/detection/psa-infographic.html

The Harms and Benefits of PSA (Prostate-Specific Antigen) Screening for Prostate Cancer.From The National Cancer Institute (NCI)

http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/detection/psa-infographic.html

Infographic: Benefits and Harms of PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer
The infographic below depicts the benefits and harms of PSA screening for prostate cancer. The estimates appeared in the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement, published July 17 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The estimates were based on 13- and 11-year follow-up data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial and the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer. According to the two trials, the best evidence of possible benefit of PSA screening is in men aged 55 to 69.
(From the National Cancer Institute Cancer Bulletin)

Infographic: Benefits and Harms of PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer

The infographic below depicts the benefits and harms of PSA screening for prostate cancer. The estimates appeared in the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement, published July 17 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The estimates were based on 13- and 11-year follow-up data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial and the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer. According to the two trials, the best evidence of possible benefit of PSA screening is in men aged 55 to 69.

(From the National Cancer Institute Cancer Bulletin)