Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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Behind the Scenes: Big Beverage

Soda companies spend big money to influence public health initiatives meant to decrease sugary drink consumption. But policies like taxes on sugary beverages can encourage people to make healthier choices. The beverage industry is doing everything in its power to keep that from happening.

Get the latest research, news, and information about public health policies aimed at reducing sugary drink consumption at
http://yaleruddcenter.org/what_we_do….

(From the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity)

Americans More Likely to Avoid Drinking Soda Than Before
July 28, 2014
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Nearly two-thirds of Americans say they avoid soda in their diet, while more than half say they avoid sugar. Meanwhile, more than nine in 10 Americans claim they try to include fruits (92%) or vegetables (93%) in their diet — slightly more than said this previously.
These data are from a July 7-10 Gallup poll that asked Americans about their consumption habits. Americans have become increasingly wary of drinking soda since Gallup began asking them about their dietary choices in 2002. At that time, only 41% said they actively tried to avoid soda, a percentage that has now jumped to 63%.
Studies continue to reveal the adverse health effects of consuming soda, and high-profile attempts to ban the purchase of large individual servings of soda or to tax it have apparently raised Americans’ consciousness about drinking it, even if closer to half still consume the beverage. At this point, 13% of Americans say they don’t think about soda intake, down from 24% a decade ago.
(From Gallup)

Americans More Likely to Avoid Drinking Soda Than Before

July 28, 2014

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Nearly two-thirds of Americans say they avoid soda in their diet, while more than half say they avoid sugar. Meanwhile, more than nine in 10 Americans claim they try to include fruits (92%) or vegetables (93%) in their diet — slightly more than said this previously.

These data are from a July 7-10 Gallup poll that asked Americans about their consumption habits. Americans have become increasingly wary of drinking soda since Gallup began asking them about their dietary choices in 2002. At that time, only 41% said they actively tried to avoid soda, a percentage that has now jumped to 63%.

Studies continue to reveal the adverse health effects of consuming soda, and high-profile attempts to ban the purchase of large individual servings of soda or to tax it have apparently raised Americans’ consciousness about drinking it, even if closer to half still consume the beverage. At this point, 13% of Americans say they don’t think about soda intake, down from 24% a decade ago.

(From Gallup)

Soda companies spend big money to influence public health initiatives meant to decrease sugary drink consumption. But policies like taxes on sugary beverages can encourage people to make healthier choices. The beverage industry is doing everything in its power to keep that from happening.

(From Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity)

Neighbourhoods with more fast-food restaurants linked to higher BMIs among residents: Ontario study
ORONTO — Neighbourhoods with a high number of fast food restaurants are no place for the weight conscious, a new study suggests.
The research reveals that the average body mass index of Canadians living in areas with a high density of fast food outlets is higher than the average BMI of people who live in neighbourhoods with more full-service restaurants.
The work was conducted by scientists at the University of Western Ontario, in London, and published in the Canadian Journal of Public Health.
Some earlier studies done in the United States have revealed similar findings, as have a couple of small studies looking only at children in two different centres in Canada. The authors say this paper is the first to show the possible link in the Canadian adults based on individual-level data.
And they say the finding could be used to justify government action, whether that’s zoning bylaws aimed at restricting the density of fast food outlets or requiring fast food restaurants to post calorie counts for the food items they serve.
(More on National Post, Toronto, Canada)

Neighbourhoods with more fast-food restaurants linked to higher BMIs among residents: Ontario study

ORONTO — Neighbourhoods with a high number of fast food restaurants are no place for the weight conscious, a new study suggests.

The research reveals that the average body mass index of Canadians living in areas with a high density of fast food outlets is higher than the average BMI of people who live in neighbourhoods with more full-service restaurants.

The work was conducted by scientists at the University of Western Ontario, in London, and published in the Canadian Journal of Public Health.

Some earlier studies done in the United States have revealed similar findings, as have a couple of small studies looking only at children in two different centres in Canada. The authors say this paper is the first to show the possible link in the Canadian adults based on individual-level data.

And they say the finding could be used to justify government action, whether that’s zoning bylaws aimed at restricting the density of fast food outlets or requiring fast food restaurants to post calorie counts for the food items they serve.

(More on National Post, Toronto, Canada)

(From New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)

(From New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)

nychealth:

TODAY!
On Twitter? Join us and NYC Health Commissioner Dr. Mary T. Bassett for a Tweetchat!
As part of the National Soda Summit this week, we will be chatting about strategies to reduce soda-related disease.
When? Today, June 3rd 2014 2-3 PM ET
Who? @DrMaryTBassett @MontefioreNYC @YaleRuddCenter @FedUpMovie @PublicHealth @ChangeLabWorks, others and you!
How? Follow hashtag #SodaSummit14 on Twitter.

nychealth:

TODAY!

On Twitter? Join us and NYC Health Commissioner Dr. Mary T. Bassett for a Tweetchat!

As part of the National Soda Summit this week, we will be chatting about strategies to reduce soda-related disease.

When? Today, June 3rd 2014 2-3 PM ET

Who? @DrMaryTBassett @MontefioreNYC @YaleRuddCenter @FedUpMovie @PublicHealth @ChangeLabWorks, others and you!

How? Follow hashtag #SodaSummit14 on Twitter.

Obesity:Complex but Conquerable
(From Institute of Medicine, IOM)

Obesity:Complex but Conquerable

(From Institute of Medicine, IOM)

Measuring the weight of the world

BY Kristin Miller 
The United States and Mexico are now effectively tied for a top spot nobody really wants — most obese in the developed world.
According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), both populations are edging the 70 percent mark for citizens who are considered overweight or obese.*
More…
(From PBS Newshour)

Measuring the weight of the world

The United States and Mexico are now effectively tied for a top spot nobody really wants — most obese in the developed world.

According to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), both populations are edging the 70 percent mark for citizens who are considered overweight or obese.*

More…

(From PBS Newshour)

(From the American Public Health Association, APHA)

(From the American Public Health
Association, APHA)

nprglobalhealth:

Europeans Are Getting Fatter, Just Like Americans
Ireland is predicted to become the fattest country in Europe by 2030, according to a study released by the World Health Organization and the UK Health Forum.
As many as 90 percent of Irish men and 84 percent of Irish women are projected to be classified as overweight or obese by then. Blame goes to the usual culprits: unhealthy diets high in sugar and fats, and a lack of exercise.
The study defines overweight as a body mass index (BMI) of 25 (169 to 202 pounds for a 5’ 9” adult, for example) and obese as a BMI of 30 (over 203 pounds for that height).
The picture isn’t a whole lot prettier for the rest of Europe. The study, which used a vast quantity of BMI measurements from around the Continent and computer modeling to predict trends, show rises in obesity rates across nearly all 53 Eurozone countries.
Even countries that aren’t at the top of the weight gain list will suffer. Forty four percent of Belgian men and 47 percent of Dutch men are projected to be classified as overweight or obese by 2030. (Note: In both countries, a popular snack is french fries with mayo.)
By contrast, three-quarters of men in England will be classed as either overweight or obese, and 8 out of 10 men in the Czech Republic, Spain and Poland.
Continue reading.
Photo: Fried cod awaits its destiny as fish and chips in London. (Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

nprglobalhealth:

Europeans Are Getting Fatter, Just Like Americans

Ireland is predicted to become the fattest country in Europe by 2030, according to a study released by the World Health Organization and the UK Health Forum.

As many as 90 percent of Irish men and 84 percent of Irish women are projected to be classified as overweight or obese by then. Blame goes to the usual culprits: unhealthy diets high in sugar and fats, and a lack of exercise.

The study defines overweight as a body mass index (BMI) of 25 (169 to 202 pounds for a 5’ 9” adult, for example) and obese as a BMI of 30 (over 203 pounds for that height).

The picture isn’t a whole lot prettier for the rest of Europe. The study, which used a vast quantity of BMI measurements from around the Continent and computer modeling to predict trends, show rises in obesity rates across nearly all 53 Eurozone countries.

Even countries that aren’t at the top of the weight gain list will suffer. Forty four percent of Belgian men and 47 percent of Dutch men are projected to be classified as overweight or obese by 2030. (Note: In both countries, a popular snack is french fries with mayo.)

By contrast, three-quarters of men in England will be classed as either overweight or obese, and 8 out of 10 men in the Czech Republic, Spain and Poland.

Continue reading.

Photo: Fried cod awaits its destiny as fish and chips in London. (Oli Scarff/Getty Images)