feastongood

feastongood:

Backstage, Ryan Shadrick Wilson, General Counsel at Partnership for a Healthier America, discusses a public health crisis revolving around food and consumption. She shares what can be done to promote healthier eating habits in America along with some alarming statistics that are motivators to make change.

You can find her stage presentation on the subject here.

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the2012scenariofan

the2012scenariofan:

via Golden Age of Gaia

A McDonald's in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen. (Credit: Reuters/Bobby Yip)

A McDonald’s in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen. (Credit: Reuters/Bobby Yip)

By Nicholas Freudenberg, Salon.com – March 3, 2014

http://tinyurl.com/m2q57bj

In the next decade or so, the people and governments of China, India, Indonesia, Brazil,…

aljazeeraamerica
aljazeeraamerica:

WHO: Governments should regulate fast food to slow obesity epidemic

Governments could slow or even reverse the growing obesity epidemic if they introduce more regulation into the global market for fast foods such as burgers, chips and fizzy drinks, researchers said in a report to be released Monday.
A study published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization (WHO) suggested that if governments took firmer action, they could start to prevent people from becoming overweight and obese – conditions with serious long-term consequences such as diabetes, heart diseases and cancer.
"Unless governments take steps to regulate their economies, the invisible hand of the market will continue to promote obesity worldwide with disastrous consequences for future public health and economic productivity," said Roberto De Vogli of the University of California, Davis, who led the study.

Read more
Photo: Matt Cardy/Getty Images

aljazeeraamerica:

WHO: Governments should regulate fast food to slow obesity epidemic

Governments could slow or even reverse the growing obesity epidemic if they introduce more regulation into the global market for fast foods such as burgers, chips and fizzy drinks, researchers said in a report to be released Monday.

A study published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization (WHO) suggested that if governments took firmer action, they could start to prevent people from becoming overweight and obese – conditions with serious long-term consequences such as diabetes, heart diseases and cancer.

"Unless governments take steps to regulate their economies, the invisible hand of the market will continue to promote obesity worldwide with disastrous consequences for future public health and economic productivity," said Roberto De Vogli of the University of California, Davis, who led the study.

Read more

Photo: Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Public health takes on obesity: A route to better health
Obesity is a serious and costly health problem facing our nation. The number of kids and teens who are obese has nearly tripled in the past three decades, leading to a generation at risk for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and other serious health problems. However, there is hope. For the first time in recent years, obesity rates have declined. Innovative public health approaches and partnerships are contributing to improved food choices and creating opportunities for physical activity, helping to curb obesity. We must continue to fund public health programs to ensure healthy futures for all of our nation’s children.
Share this infographic widely and use it as an example when talking to your members of Congress and other policymakers about the importance of strong public health funding.
(From American Public Health Association, APHA)

Public health takes on obesity: A route to better health

Obesity is a serious and costly health problem facing our nation. The number of kids and teens who are obese has nearly tripled in the past three decades, leading to a generation at risk for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and other serious health problems. However, there is hope. For the first time in recent years, obesity rates have declined. Innovative public health approaches and partnerships are contributing to improved food choices and creating opportunities for physical activity, helping to curb obesity. We must continue to fund public health programs to ensure healthy futures for all of our nation’s children.

Share this infographic widely and use it as an example when talking to your members of Congress and other policymakers about the importance of strong public health funding.

(From American Public Health Association, APHA)

Government workers exercise at their office in Mexico City, August 2013. To counter the obesity epidemic, the city requires all government employees to do at least 20 minutes of exercise each day.
Overweight People In Developing World Outnumber Those In Rich Countries
People are getting fatter around the world. And the problem is growing most rapidly in developing countries, researchers reported Friday.

"Over the last 30 years, the number of people who are overweight and obese in the developing world has tripled," says , of the Overseas Development Institute in London.

One-third of adults globally are now overweight compared with fewer than 23 percent in 1980, the report . And the number of overweight and obese people in the developing world now far overshadows the number in rich countries.

"As countries go from being low-income to middle-income, and heading towards high-income, people earn more [money], and they can eat the foods that they find tasty," says Wiggins, who co-authored the report.

Many foods people find tasty are also often the most fattening. Globalization has made high-calorie snack foods readily available at low cost almost everywhere.

Take , for instance, which Wiggins calls a “poster child” for the global obesity problem.

"If you walk into a Mexican village store," he says, "you’ll be confronted with lots of tasty offerings of potato chips, nice cookies with lots of fat and sugar in them and lots of sweetened carbonated drinks — all kinds of stuff, which is terrific in small quantities, but not when you start to eat it in large quantities."

In 1980, less than 40 percent of Mexican women were overweight. By 2008, almost 70 percent were.

In some Pacific Island nations, more than 90 percent of men are now considered overweight. The Middle East is also seeing a boom in chubbiness.

"It’s something like 3 out of every 4 adult Egyptian women are now overweight or obese," Wiggins says.

This rapid growth in waist sizes poses huge challenges for health systems, especially those that are already overburdened in poorer countries.

Excessive consumption of fat, salt and sugar are “significant contributory factors to some cancers, cardiovascular disease and diabetes,” the report noted. These diseases are costly to emerging economies, not only because of increased health care expenses, but also because of lost productivity.

"It’s a personal and societal problem of considerable magnitude," Wiggins says.

Reversing this global trend, he says, could be accomplished with small changes to people’s diets. In particular, public health campaigns could encourage families to substitute fruits and vegetables for high-calorie snacks.

But, the report concludes, there’s been little political will in developing nations — where workers are finally enjoying a bit of disposable income — to tell people what they should or shouldn’t be eating.
(From Shots: Health News from NPR)

Government workers exercise at their office in Mexico City, August 2013. To counter the obesity epidemic, the city requires all government employees to do at least 20 minutes of exercise each day.

Overweight People In Developing World Outnumber Those In Rich Countries

People are getting fatter around the world. And the problem is growing most rapidly in developing countries, researchers reported Friday.

"Over the last 30 years, the number of people who are overweight and obese in the developing world has tripled," says , of the Overseas Development Institute in London.

One-third of adults globally are now overweight compared with fewer than 23 percent in 1980, the report . And the number of overweight and obese people in the developing world now far overshadows the number in rich countries.

"As countries go from being low-income to middle-income, and heading towards high-income, people earn more [money], and they can eat the foods that they find tasty," says Wiggins, who co-authored the report.

Many foods people find tasty are also often the most fattening. Globalization has made high-calorie snack foods readily available at low cost almost everywhere.

Take , for instance, which Wiggins calls a “poster child” for the global obesity problem.

"If you walk into a Mexican village store," he says, "you’ll be confronted with lots of tasty offerings of potato chips, nice cookies with lots of fat and sugar in them and lots of sweetened carbonated drinks — all kinds of stuff, which is terrific in small quantities, but not when you start to eat it in large quantities."

In 1980, less than 40 percent of Mexican women were overweight. By 2008, almost 70 percent were.

In some Pacific Island nations, more than 90 percent of men are now considered overweight. The Middle East is also seeing a boom in chubbiness.

"It’s something like 3 out of every 4 adult Egyptian women are now overweight or obese," Wiggins says.

This rapid growth in waist sizes poses huge challenges for health systems, especially those that are already overburdened in poorer countries.

Excessive consumption of fat, salt and sugar are “significant contributory factors to some cancers, cardiovascular disease and diabetes,” the report noted. These diseases are costly to emerging economies, not only because of increased health care expenses, but also because of lost productivity.

"It’s a personal and societal problem of considerable magnitude," Wiggins says.

Reversing this global trend, he says, could be accomplished with small changes to people’s diets. In particular, public health campaigns could encourage families to substitute fruits and vegetables for high-calorie snacks.

But, the report concludes, there’s been little political will in developing nations — where workers are finally enjoying a bit of disposable income — to tell people what they should or shouldn’t be eating.

(From Shots: Health News from NPR)

Where are you on the global fat scale?

Notes: This calculator is based on research data pulled together by a team of researchers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
Using UN data on population size in 177 countries, together with estimates of global weight from the WHO and mean height from national health examination surveys the team were able to calculate average BMI figures for each country.
Using the values that you input into the calculator, it works out your BMI as well as where you are in relation to the rest of the population in your country and the world for your gender and age.
As with all large data sets, there is a margin of error in this calculation, something statisticians call “standard deviation”. This is indicated on the graph by the faint band either side of your indicated BMI measure.
* Your range is a reference to the “standard deviation from the mean”, in other words your result is likely to vary within these boundaries.
Click here or in the title to access the calculator
(From BBC)
Where are you on the global fat scale?

Notes: This calculator is based on research data pulled together by a team of researchers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Using UN data on population size in 177 countries, together with estimates of global weight from the WHO and mean height from national health examination surveys the team were able to calculate average BMI figures for each country.

Using the values that you input into the calculator, it works out your BMI as well as where you are in relation to the rest of the population in your country and the world for your gender and age.

As with all large data sets, there is a margin of error in this calculation, something statisticians call “standard deviation”. This is indicated on the graph by the faint band either side of your indicated BMI measure.

* Your range is a reference to the “standard deviation from the mean”, in other words your result is likely to vary within these boundaries.

Click here or in the title to access the calculator

(From BBC)