Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget.
Flash Player 9 is required.

Using Soccer to Empower Young Women

SKILLZ Street (SS) is an all-girls soccer-based programme developed by Grassroot Soccer (GRS) that combines HIV educational activities, sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) knowledge, and soccer. SS also partners with the Thuthuzela Care Center (TCC) for medical and social services.

(From GOOD-The GOOD Pioneers of Health: Africa Edition)

gov-info:

NIH Gov Doc: NIBIB Bionic Man: Cutting-Edge Biotechnology Research
The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering recently launched the “NIBIB Bionic Man,” an interactive Web tool that allows students and the public to learn about cutting-edge research in biotechnology.
The bionic man features 14 technologies currently being developed by NIBIB-supported researchers. Examples include a powered prosthetic leg that helps users achieve a more natural gait, a wireless brain-computer interface that lets people with paralyzed legs and arms control computer devices or robotic limbs using only their thoughts, and a micro-patch that delivers vaccines painlessly and doesn’t need refrigeration.

gov-info:

NIH Gov Doc: NIBIB Bionic Man: Cutting-Edge Biotechnology Research

The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering recently launched the “NIBIB Bionic Man,” an interactive Web tool that allows students and the public to learn about cutting-edge research in biotechnology.

The bionic man features 14 technologies currently being developed by NIBIB-supported researchers. Examples include a powered prosthetic leg that helps users achieve a more natural gait, a wireless brain-computer interface that lets people with paralyzed legs and arms control computer devices or robotic limbs using only their thoughts, and a micro-patch that delivers vaccines painlessly and doesn’t need refrigeration.

nprglobalhealth:

How A Dissolvable ‘Tampon’ Could One Day Help Women Stop HIV
When it comes to protecting themselves from HIV, women need more options.
About 84 percent of all women diagnosed with HIV contract the virus through heterosexual sex. And right now, the female condom is the only contraception available that stops HIV — and is controlled by the woman. These devices can be hard to find and tough to use.
Now engineers at the University of Washington in Seattle have come up with an experimental technologythat may one day make HIV protection for women as easy as using a tampon.
For years, scientists have been developing gels or creams that contain anti-HIV drugs known as microbicides. But these topical ointments can be problematic. They’re messy to apply. They can leak. And the medication absorbs slowly, so women have to use the gels or creams at least 20 minutes before sex.
A new delivery method could solve all these problems, say bioengineers Cameron Ball and Kim Woodrow. The secret? An electrically spun fabric.
Continue reading.
Photo: Better than Egyptian cotton: This electrically spun fabric contains anti-HIV drugs and dissolves rapidly when it gets wet. (Courtesy of University of Washington)

nprglobalhealth:

How A Dissolvable ‘Tampon’ Could One Day Help Women Stop HIV

When it comes to protecting themselves from HIV, women need more options.

About 84 percent of all women diagnosed with HIV contract the virus through heterosexual sex. And right now, the female condom is the only contraception available that stops HIV — and is controlled by the woman. These devices can be hard to find and tough to use.

Now engineers at the University of Washington in Seattle have come up with an experimental technologythat may one day make HIV protection for women as easy as using a tampon.

For years, scientists have been developing gels or creams that contain anti-HIV drugs known as microbicides. But these topical ointments can be problematic. They’re messy to apply. They can leak. And the medication absorbs slowly, so women have to use the gels or creams at least 20 minutes before sex.

A new delivery method could solve all these problems, say bioengineers Cameron Ball and Kim Woodrow. The secret? An electrically spun fabric.

Continue reading.

Photo: Better than Egyptian cotton: This electrically spun fabric contains anti-HIV drugs and dissolves rapidly when it gets wet. (Courtesy of University of Washington)



Table

Twitter data mentioning indoor tanning (March 27–April 10, 2013)


Twitter: an opportunity for public health campaigns
Twitter is a popular medium for communication and information sharing with 200 million active users and 400 million tweets per day. Almost a third of internet users 18—24 years old use Twitter, and 20% use it daily.

Indoor tanning, which is associated with an increased risk of skin cancer, has reached alarming rates among young people, with about 20% of teenagers using indoor tanning.
We assess the frequency of mentions of indoor tanning and tanning health risks on Twitter. We used the Twitter Streaming Application Programming Interface (API) to collect in real time all tweets (English language) mentioning indoor tanning, tanning bed, tanning booth, tanning salon, sun bed, or sun lamp, over 2 weeks (March 27, 2013, to April 10, 2013). Data are presented in the table.

(more in The Lancet)
Table
Twitter data mentioning indoor tanning (March 27–April 10, 2013)

Twitter: an opportunity for public health campaigns

Twitter is a popular medium for communication and information sharing with 200 million active users and 400 million tweets per day. Almost a third of internet users 18—24 years old use Twitter, and 20% use it daily.
Indoor tanning, which is associated with an increased risk of skin cancer, has reached alarming rates among young people, with about 20% of teenagers using indoor tanning.
We assess the frequency of mentions of indoor tanning and tanning health risks on Twitter. We used the Twitter Streaming Application Programming Interface (API) to collect in real time all tweets (English language) mentioning indoor tanning, tanning bed, tanning booth, tanning salon, sun bed, or sun lamp, over 2 weeks (March 27, 2013, to April 10, 2013). Data are presented in the table.

fastcompany:

The Samsung Smart Bike can spy on cars behind you, and create a bike lane for protection.

What Is FluTracking?

FluTracking is an online health surveillance system to detect epidemics of influenza. We are looking for people who live in Australia and have easy access to email on a weekly basis. It doesn’t matter if you are vaccinated or unvaccinated.

It takes only 10 - 15 seconds each week. We ask if you have had fever or cough in the last week. This will help us find ways to detect both seasonal influenza and hopefully pandemic influenza and other diseases so we can better protect the community from epidemics.

(From FluTracking.net)

Someday Soon You May Swallow A Computer With Your Pill
What if you could swallow a computer the size of a poppy seed, and it could report back exactly if and when you took a medicine while recording how your body responded to the drug?
It sounds crazy, but the tiny computers exist. It sounds dangerous, but they were approved by the Food and Drug Administration. And the company that makes them, Proteus, has tens of millions of dollars and relationships with some of the biggest drug companies in the world, including Novartis.
David O’Reilly, the chief product officer at Proteus, says he believes that someday soon every single pill a doctor prescribes will come with an electronic component embedded right in it that tracks the pill’s absorption in your body.
How Does It Work?
Working together with a small flexible patch you wear, like a Band-Aid, and a smartphone, Proteus wants to ring in a new era of what it calls “digital medicine” in which your body’s vital signs and the medications entering your bloodstream can be tracked by computers. Software will search your body’s data for patterns in real time and report that information to your doctors.
Let me step back for a minute to explain how it all works. The big challenges to making a computer you can ingest are size, safety, power and communication.
It must be tiny, as you’re limited both by the size of the throat and the need to keep the amount of foreign material going into one’s stomach to a minimum. The Proteus computer isn’t much bigger than a grain of sand, and it attaches right to the pill.
It also can’t be made of anything weird or harmful. So, Proteus’ ingestible sensor is made only out of metals that people normally eat as part of their daily diets: silicon, copper, magnesium.
More…
http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/06/18/323243085/someday-soon-you-may-swallow-a-computer-with-your-pill
(From Shots—Health News from NPR)

Someday Soon You May Swallow A Computer With Your Pill

What if you could swallow a computer the size of a poppy seed, and it could report back exactly if and when you took a medicine while recording how your body responded to the drug?

It sounds crazy, but the tiny computers exist. It sounds dangerous, but they were approved by the Food and Drug Administration. And the company that makes them, Proteus, has tens of millions of dollars and relationships with some of the biggest drug companies in the world, including Novartis.

David O’Reilly, the chief product officer at Proteus, says he believes that someday soon every single pill a doctor prescribes will come with an electronic component embedded right in it that tracks the pill’s absorption in your body.

How Does It Work?

Working together with a small flexible patch you wear, like a Band-Aid, and a smartphone, Proteus wants to ring in a new era of what it calls “digital medicine” in which your body’s vital signs and the medications entering your bloodstream can be tracked by computers. Software will search your body’s data for patterns in real time and report that information to your doctors.

Let me step back for a minute to explain how it all works. The big challenges to making a computer you can ingest are size, safety, power and communication.

It must be tiny, as you’re limited both by the size of the throat and the need to keep the amount of foreign material going into one’s stomach to a minimum. The Proteus computer isn’t much bigger than a grain of sand, and it attaches right to the pill.

It also can’t be made of anything weird or harmful. So, Proteus’ ingestible sensor is made only out of metals that people normally eat as part of their daily diets: silicon, copper, magnesium.

More…

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/06/18/323243085/someday-soon-you-may-swallow-a-computer-with-your-pill

(From Shots—Health News from NPR)

brit:

WebMD’s latest app wants to help transform your health. 

brit:

WebMD’s latest app wants to help transform your health. 

Next generation condoms at UOW

University of Wollongong
————————————————————­—————————
A team of researchers from the University of Wollongong (UOW) has received Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funding to help develop a Next Generation Condom that significantly preserves or enhances pleasure, in order to improve uptake and regular use.

(From U. of Wollongong, Australia)


Smartphone app reads blood oxygen levels, forewarns of life-threatening pre-eclampsia
$2 million investment for testing in developing world obstetrics
March 14, 2014


LionsGate Technologies (LGTmedical), a Vancouver-based social enterprise, has secured its first major financial backers to scale up development of the Phone Oximeter.

This is an app and medical sensor that turns a non-specialist, community-level health worker’s smartphone, tablet computer or laptop into an affordable and simple but sophisticated medical-grade diagnostic tool that is typically only available, in the developing world,  in some hospitals.

The app works with plug-in hardware for hospital-standard measurements of blood oxygen and can forewarn of life-threatening pre-eclampsia with 80% accuracy, offering the developing world a tool to help prevent countless thousands of maternal and child deaths.

The Canadian federal government, through Toronto-based Grand Challenges Canada, together with private investors, are announcing $2 million funding for confirmation studies this year involving 80,000 women in Asia (India, Pakistan) and Africa (Namibia, Mozambique).

The federal government investment is the first under a new $10 million strategic partnership with Grand Challenges Canada to help fast-track several of the most promising global health innovations in its pipeline.


The Phone Oximeter in use at Mulago Hospital Kampala Uganda (credit: LionsGate Technologies)


Developed by scientists Mark Ansermino, Guy Dumont and Peter von Dadelszen of the University of British Columbia, the device measures blood oxygen levels through a light sensor attached to a person’s fingertip. This technique is known as pulse oximetry.

Avoiding deaths in developing countries

The Phone Oximeter can accurately predict roughly 80% of cases of pregnant women at risk of life-threatening complications due to high blood pressure. The condition, pre-eclampsia, is one of three leading causes of maternal mortality.

Each year, about 76,000 of an estimated 10 million pregnant women worldwide who develop pre-eclampsia die from it and related complications. The number of fetus and infant deaths due to these disorders is estimated at more than 500,000.

“That equates to over 1,600 deaths of pregnant young women and babies every day and more than 99% of these deaths occur in developing countries, an issue of social justice,” said von Dadelszen.

The Phone Oximeter can also reveal dangerously low oxygen levels in patients with pneumonia, which kills more than 1 million children annually.

The $40 target price will make it 80% less costly than any other device capable today of meeting high-level medical standards. It is expected to be available in Spring 2014 (more info).

Tests to fine-tune the device will involve monitoring blood-oxygen levels of athletes in training, allowing developers to fast-track its preliminary use. Longer term medical trials of the mobile application and its pre-eclampsia predictive capability will involve 80,000 women in four countries: India, Pakistan, Mozambique and Nigeria.
(From kurzweilai.net)

Smartphone app reads blood oxygen levels, forewarns of life-threatening pre-eclampsia

$2 million investment for testing in developing world obstetrics
March 14, 2014

LionsGate Technologies (LGTmedical), a Vancouver-based social enterprise, has secured its first major financial backers to scale up development of the Phone Oximeter.

This is an app and medical sensor that turns a non-specialist, community-level health worker’s smartphone, tablet computer or laptop into an affordable and simple but sophisticated medical-grade diagnostic tool that is typically only available, in the developing world,  in some hospitals.

The app works with plug-in hardware for hospital-standard measurements of blood oxygen and can forewarn of life-threatening pre-eclampsia with 80% accuracy, offering the developing world a tool to help prevent countless thousands of maternal and child deaths.

The Canadian federal government, through Toronto-based Grand Challenges Canada, together with private investors, are announcing $2 million funding for confirmation studies this year involving 80,000 women in Asia (India, Pakistan) and Africa (Namibia, Mozambique).

The federal government investment is the first under a new $10 million strategic partnership with Grand Challenges Canada to help fast-track several of the most promising global health innovations in its pipeline.

The Phone Oximeter in use at Mulago Hospital Kampala Uganda

The Phone Oximeter in use at Mulago Hospital Kampala Uganda (credit: LionsGate Technologies)

Developed by scientists Mark Ansermino, Guy Dumont and Peter von Dadelszen of the University of British Columbia, the device measures blood oxygen levels through a light sensor attached to a person’s fingertip. This technique is known as pulse oximetry.

Avoiding deaths in developing countries

The Phone Oximeter can accurately predict roughly 80% of cases of pregnant women at risk of life-threatening complications due to high blood pressure. The condition, pre-eclampsia, is one of three leading causes of maternal mortality.

Each year, about 76,000 of an estimated 10 million pregnant women worldwide who develop pre-eclampsia die from it and related complications. The number of fetus and infant deaths due to these disorders is estimated at more than 500,000.

“That equates to over 1,600 deaths of pregnant young women and babies every day and more than 99% of these deaths occur in developing countries, an issue of social justice,” said von Dadelszen.

The Phone Oximeter can also reveal dangerously low oxygen levels in patients with pneumonia, which kills more than 1 million children annually.

The $40 target price will make it 80% less costly than any other device capable today of meeting high-level medical standards. It is expected to be available in Spring 2014 (more info).

Tests to fine-tune the device will involve monitoring blood-oxygen levels of athletes in training, allowing developers to fast-track its preliminary use. Longer term medical trials of the mobile application and its pre-eclampsia predictive capability will involve 80,000 women in four countries: India, Pakistan, Mozambique and Nigeria.

(From kurzweilai.net)