gov-info
gov-info:

NIH Gov App: Free Medical Translation
The Canopy Medical Translator has been created with funding from the National Institutes of Health.This free app can be used in situations where an interpreter is not available. It translates medical phrases covering history, physical exam, procedures, and reassessment in Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, Bengali, Filipino, Hindi, Korean, Malay, Portuguese, Russian, Vietnamese, and more

gov-info:

NIH Gov App: Free Medical Translation

The Canopy Medical Translator has been created with funding from the National Institutes of Health.This free app can be used in situations where an interpreter is not available. It translates medical phrases covering history, physical exam, procedures, and reassessment in Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, Bengali, Filipino, Hindi, Korean, Malay, Portuguese, Russian, Vietnamese, and more

txchnologist

txchnologist:

Smart Solution To Stop Needle Reuse Wins Design Impact Award

Healthcare providers reusing unsterilized syringes and needles cause more than 1.3 million infections around the world every year, according to the World Health Organization. Ignorance of the dangers and a lack of supplies means that the average syringe is reused four times in the developing world, says advocacy and education charity Safepoint

The problem, which spreads bloodborne pathogens like hepatitis and AIDS HIV (h/t and good catch to sexeducationforprudes), led healthcare designer David Swann and his team at the University of Huddersfield in the United Kingdom to come up with a simple and cheap visual aid. 

They created a syringe coated with a color-changing dye that turns red when exposed to carbon dioxide. The so-called A Behavior-Changing (ABC) syringe is stored in a nitrogen-filled pack and starts changing color only when the pack is punctured or the syringe is removed. Read more below and see the video.

Read More

nprglobalhealth
nprglobalhealth:

To Clean Drinking Water, All You Need Is A Stick
Removing all the dangerous bacteria from drinking water would have enormous health benefits for people around the world.
The technologies exist for doing that, but there’s a problem: cost.
Now MIT’s Rohit Karnik thinks he’s on to a much less expensive way to clean up water: Use the xylem of a plant.
Now if you remember your high school biology, you’ll know that xylem is the stuff in plants that transports water in the form of sap from the roots to the leaves.
"And the way the water is moved is by evaporation from the leaves," says Karnik.
It’s somewhat like what happens when you put a straw into a glass of liquid. Evaporation from the leaves has the same effect as sucking on the straw.
Pulling water up to the leaves this way creates a problem for the plant, but also an opportunity for an inventor.
The plant’s problem is something called cavitation, or the growth of air bubbles, which makes it harder for water to reach the leaves. But Karnik says xylem has a way of getting rid of these bubbles.
"The xylem has membranes with pores and other mechanisms by which bubbles are prevented from easily spreading and flowing in the xylem tissue," he says.
And it turns out these same pores that are so good at filtering out air bubbles are just the right size for filtering out nasty bacteria.
To prove it worked, he created a simple setup in his lab. He peeled the bark off a pine branch and took the sapwood underneath containing the xylem into a tube. He then sent a stream of water containing tiny particles through the tube and showed that the wood filter removed them.
"We also flowed in bacteria and showed we could filter out bacteria using the xylem," he says. Karnik estimates the xylem removed 99.9 percent of the bacteria.





The results were published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE.
Continue reading.
Image: Making a xylem water filter is easy: Just peel back the bark and stick inside a tube. (PLOS ONE)

nprglobalhealth:

To Clean Drinking Water, All You Need Is A Stick

Removing all the dangerous bacteria from drinking water would have enormous health benefits for people around the world.

The technologies exist for doing that, but there’s a problem: cost.

Now MIT’s Rohit Karnik thinks he’s on to a much less expensive way to clean up water: Use the xylem of a plant.

Now if you remember your high school biology, you’ll know that xylem is the stuff in plants that transports water in the form of sap from the roots to the leaves.

"And the way the water is moved is by evaporation from the leaves," says Karnik.

It’s somewhat like what happens when you put a straw into a glass of liquid. Evaporation from the leaves has the same effect as sucking on the straw.

Pulling water up to the leaves this way creates a problem for the plant, but also an opportunity for an inventor.

The plant’s problem is something called cavitation, or the growth of air bubbles, which makes it harder for water to reach the leaves. But Karnik says xylem has a way of getting rid of these bubbles.

"The xylem has membranes with pores and other mechanisms by which bubbles are prevented from easily spreading and flowing in the xylem tissue," he says.

And it turns out these same pores that are so good at filtering out air bubbles are just the right size for filtering out nasty bacteria.

To prove it worked, he created a simple setup in his lab. He peeled the bark off a pine branch and took the sapwood underneath containing the xylem into a tube. He then sent a stream of water containing tiny particles through the tube and showed that the wood filter removed them.

"We also flowed in bacteria and showed we could filter out bacteria using the xylem," he says. Karnik estimates the xylem removed 99.9 percent of the bacteria.

The results were published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE.

Continue reading.

Image: Making a xylem water filter is easy: Just peel back the bark and stick inside a tube. (PLOS ONE)

biovisual

biovisual:

ABC SYRINGE
The ABC Syringe, a World Design Impact Prize finalist, could make injections safer.  Some 1.3 million deaths a year are caused by unsafe injections, mostly from Hepatitis C infections.

The ABC Syringe turns bright red within 60 seconds of someone opening its foil package, indicating that it shouldn’t be used again. The syringe contains an ink that changes color when exposed to CO2.

via World Changing Designs)

Combat illness and infectious diseases in real-time with BigData
Scientists from IBM are collaborating with John Hopkins University and University of California, San Francisco to combat illness and infectious diseases in real-time with smarter data tools for public health by applying the latest analytic models, computing technology and mathematical skills on an open-source framework.
(From IBM)
Combat illness and infectious diseases in real-time with BigData

Scientists from IBM are collaborating with John Hopkins University and University of California, San Francisco to combat illness and infectious diseases in real-time with smarter data tools for public health by applying the latest analytic models, computing technology and mathematical skills on an open-source framework.

(From IBM)

nursingisinmyblood

theeblond:

Researchers at the University of Rochester have now been able to use Twitter to predict how likely it is for a Twitter user to become sick. After data analysis, the inferred pattern of disease spread led to the creation of an app showing the context of sick people with predictions of up to 8 days of future health at a 90% accuracy rate.

This Nigerian doctor runs his hospital on corn cobs and used bike parts

Dr. Oluyombo Awojobi inspects the autoclaves at his clinic in Eruwa, Nigeria. The autoclaves, which sterilize surgical equipment, are made from recycled propane cylinders.

In the small farming town of Eruwa, Nigeria, goats graze outside the entrance of a low concrete building. Inside, mothers recline with their babies on worn, well-used beds.

This is Eruwa’s main hospital. It isn’t fancy, and it isn’t meant to be.

“For me, it doesn’t matter what it looks like, as long as it’s functional,” says Dr. Oluyombo Awojobi. He founded the hospital 27 years ago on that philosophy.

What keeps his hospital running — and growing — are cheap, simple devices that he designs and makes himself.

“I’m using materials readily available in my backyard,” he says.

The benefits of low-tech

Awojobi shows me the clinic’s operating table. You raise and lower it not with electronic controls, but with a jack like the one you would use to change a car tire.

His blood centrifuge, which separates plasma from red blood cells, is made from used bike parts. You pedal with your hands and it spins the blood sample as fast as the propeller on a small airplane.

The suction pump that the clinic uses to remove blood and fluids during surgery is made from the valve on a bicycle inner tube and is also powered by pedaling.

The hospital’s boiler is made from an old propane tank. For fuel, it uses corn cobs collected from nearby farms. The boiler produces steam for the autoclave, which sterilizes the surgical equipment.

Because most of Awojobi’s devices don’t need electricity, the hospital doesn’t have to rely on the town’s unpredictable electrical grid or spend a lot of money running diesel generators when power is down.

That keeps care at the hospital affordable to the farmers who make up its clientele. Delivering a baby costs $30.

And Dr. Awojobi says there is another advantage to designing his own equipment. “Because I make it, I will know how to mend it,” he explains. “I don’t have to depend upon anybody else.”

Sharing his inventions

Awojobi has been widely recognized for his inventions. He has been asked to lecture at medical conferences in India, Thailand, and the UK, and the Nigerian government has given him awards as a surgeon and as an engineer.

Among patients, his hospital has earned a national reputation for reliable, competent care. I met a woman named Bunmi Adams who came to the hospital for fibroid surgery. She flew in from Abuja, Nigeria’s capital.

“Because I have heard a lot about Professor Awojobi, I decided on my own to come down here,” she said.

As for his inventions, Awojobi wants to make them as widely available as possible. He does not seek patents. Instead, he publishes his designs in international medical journals.

But he has been frustrated that only a handful of other hospitals have adopted his devices. To explain the resistance he has encountered from the medical community, Awojobi points to a quote from the Renaissance philosopher Niccolo Macchiavelli. He keeps it framed on his wall.

“There is nothing more difficult to carry out, nor more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to handle than to initiate a new order of things,” it reads.

Since 2006, Dr. Awojobi has been trying another tactic to initiate his new order in medicine. He has taken on residents from a nearby medical school and is now training them to deliver his unusual style of high-quality care with low-tech equipment.

(from Public Radio International, PRI)

nprglobalhealth
nprglobalhealth:

Saving Preemies’ Lives Starts With An Aquarium Pump And Plastic Shoebox
Rural hospitals in the low-income countries have lots of problems. Some are huge: lack of electricity, lack of staff, lack of supplies. But some problems are much smaller, and can be overcome with a bit of ingenuity.
"We want to teach our students that they can solve these problems," says Rice engineering professor Maria Oden.
Oden runs a program called Rice 360, designed to get students to first learn about the problems of rural hospitals and then find solutions. Oden’s partner in this project, Rebecca Richards-Kortum, is the chairwoman of bioengineering at Rice.
"These are not going to be MRI machines or CT machines," she says. "These are going to be simple technologies that you could develop in the course of a semester or in the course of a year."
One of the most successful projects has been something called a bubble CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure). It helps premature infants breathe by pushing a steam of air into their lungs.
Richards-Kortum says a team of Rice students found some clever ways to make a bubble CPAP that was affordable.
"One of the wonderful things about working with 18-year-olds is that they’re so creative," she says. "They don’t have fixed ideas about what might not work. And so you get really crazy ideas. Like inside our bubble CPAP machine, there’s aquarium pumps."
Aquarium pumps?
Well, why not? They’re cheap, and they worked. The prototype for the CPAP device was made with a plastic shoe box from Target and two fish tank pumps to get enough flow.
Oden says they’ve tested their bubble CPAP in rural hospitals in Malawi, and now they’re starting to deploy them at hospitals around that country. The device has been snazzied-up to look more professional, but it’s basically the same as the original design, aquarium pumps and all.
Richards-Kortum and Oden went to Malawi a while back with one of the students who had worked on the bubble CPAP design project. They visited one of the rural hospitals where they’d tested the device. A nurse told them they had used the CPAP on her own baby, and it saved his life.
"She was able to go get her baby, so that we could meet the baby, and the student was able to look and see a life that she had affected," Richards-Kortum says. "It sent chills all the way down my entire spine, because I realized that while we’re teaching students, and we want them to leave here believing they can make a difference, this was the picture of a true difference being made."
Continue reading.
Photograph: Neonatal nurse Florence Mwenifumbo monitors a newborn receiving bubble CPAP treatment in Blantyre, Malawi. The device was developed by students at Rice University in Houston. (Rice 360/Rice University)

nprglobalhealth:

Saving Preemies’ Lives Starts With An Aquarium Pump And Plastic Shoebox

Rural hospitals in the low-income countries have lots of problems. Some are huge: lack of electricity, lack of staff, lack of supplies. But some problems are much smaller, and can be overcome with a bit of ingenuity.

"We want to teach our students that they can solve these problems," says Rice engineering professor Maria Oden.

Oden runs a program called Rice 360, designed to get students to first learn about the problems of rural hospitals and then find solutions. Oden’s partner in this project, Rebecca Richards-Kortum, is the chairwoman of bioengineering at Rice.

"These are not going to be MRI machines or CT machines," she says. "These are going to be simple technologies that you could develop in the course of a semester or in the course of a year."

One of the most successful projects has been something called a bubble CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure). It helps premature infants breathe by pushing a steam of air into their lungs.

Richards-Kortum says a team of Rice students found some clever ways to make a bubble CPAP that was affordable.

"One of the wonderful things about working with 18-year-olds is that they’re so creative," she says. "They don’t have fixed ideas about what might not work. And so you get really crazy ideas. Like inside our bubble CPAP machine, there’s aquarium pumps."

Aquarium pumps?

Well, why not? They’re cheap, and they worked. The prototype for the CPAP device was made with a plastic shoe box from Target and two fish tank pumps to get enough flow.

Oden says they’ve tested their bubble CPAP in rural hospitals in Malawi, and now they’re starting to deploy them at hospitals around that country. The device has been snazzied-up to look more professional, but it’s basically the same as the original design, aquarium pumps and all.

Richards-Kortum and Oden went to Malawi a while back with one of the students who had worked on the bubble CPAP design project. They visited one of the rural hospitals where they’d tested the device. A nurse told them they had used the CPAP on her own baby, and it saved his life.

"She was able to go get her baby, so that we could meet the baby, and the student was able to look and see a life that she had affected," Richards-Kortum says. "It sent chills all the way down my entire spine, because I realized that while we’re teaching students, and we want them to leave here believing they can make a difference, this was the picture of a true difference being made."

Continue reading.

Photograph: Neonatal nurse Florence Mwenifumbo monitors a newborn receiving bubble CPAP treatment in Blantyre, Malawi. The device was developed by students at Rice University in Houston. (Rice 360/Rice University)