Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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nychealthyneighborhoods:

Another way to eat fresh! Health Bucks are here!

Developed and distributed by the NYC Health Department, Health Bucks are $2 vouchers to purchase fresh fruit and vegetables at local farmers markets.

SNAP recipients can get greater purchasing power by using their EBT card at participating farmers markets.  For every $5 swiped off of a person’s EBT, he or she will receive a $2 Health Bucks.  That means, spend $5 but get $7, spend $10 but get $14!

Community organizations can also apply to receive Health Bucks to distribute to their clients and families.  Click here to download the Health Bucks application.  After the applications are reviewed, Health Bucks are distributed on a “first come, first serve” basis while supplies last.

npr:

School Lunch Debate: What’s At Stake?
School lunches have never been known for culinary excellence. But to be fair, the National School Lunch Program — which provides free or reduced lunches to about 31 million kids every day — has never aimed to dazzle as much as to fill little bellies.
Image: kcline/iStockphoto.com

npr:

School Lunch Debate: What’s At Stake?

School lunches have never been known for culinary excellence. But to be fair, the National School Lunch Program — which provides free or reduced lunches to about 31 million kids every day — has never aimed to dazzle as much as to fill little bellies.

Image: kcline/iStockphoto.com

Join the Food Revolution!

ottawahealth:

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May 16th is the third annual Food Revolution Day. This day of action is led by award winning celebrity chef Jamie Oliver. Just like many in the healthcare community, Jamie Oliver noticed the lack of cooking skills in our modern-day society.  Food Revolution Day was created to raise awareness and help tackle this issue.

Let’s get people of all age groups cooking again!

Research is showing that people are buying more processed, pre-prepared and convenience foods. For many families, buying these ready-made foods has become the norm. This takes away from the traditional ‘from scratch’ cooking and food preparation skills that parents used to pass on to their children1. Without the opportunity to observe and practice ‘from scratch’ cooking at home, how will our children learn to cook for themselves?

We shouldn’t underestimate the importance of starting early in teaching children how-to prepare good food from scratch. Showing children that cooking can be fun will serve them well as they learn to live healthier lives!

Read More

ottawahealth:

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For many people, the term “daycare food” conjures up images of hotdogs, canned soup and bologna sandwiches. In recent years, a growing number of concerned operators and chefs have taken a fresh look at what’s on their daycare menus. The result? More and more centres are experimenting with…

5 Sugar Shockers: What’s In Your Favorite Foods?
"

You may be indulging your sweet tooth without even knowing it. Sugar is hiding in places most people don’t expect — including the surprising foods in this infographic.

Sugar shockers infographic

(via allheartcare)
datarank:

Proposed FDA Rule Changes Build on Consumer Discussion & May Portend Packaged Foods Market Changes
In an ongoing effort to combat obesity and promote public health the Obama administration is promoting proposed Food and Drug Administration changes to food labeling, the first significant changes since 1993.  The agency proposed the update on February 27th as the and among the proposed changes are:
Updated serving sizes to more accurately reflect actual consumption
Larger, bolded calorie count font
New daily values which are displayed first
A new category called “added sugar”
 To see how well these changes resonated with consumer concerns DataRank analyzed consumer conversations around nutrition labels on a sample of consumer-packaged goods to see which ingredients got the most attention.
Given the large concern around calories, serving size, and sugar, the proposed changes play into consumer’s go-to indicators of health.  One area of change which has generated little discussion is “recommended daily values”, or the average amount of any vitamin, chemical, or quantity a person should consume in a day, indicates consumers rely less on these pre-tabulated measures than the raw values provided on the label. The FDA’s proposed updates and more prominent position will likely serve to bring more consumer focus to the daily values while enhancing discussion on already important indicators. Overall, the food label update is hitting consumers’ concerns. Other concerns, such as genetically modified organism labeling, are still relatively far from the FDA’s rulemaking docket regardless of activist pressure.
The nutrition label update could herald changes in both consumer and producer behavior.  Consumers, already sensitive to caloric intake and the role of sugars in their diets, may shy away from products with added sugar or become even stricter calorie-counters as the information becomes more prominent. Companies could also feel the changes as consumer preferences adjust to new information and attention is drawn to parts of the label that previously received little more than a cursory glance. Advocates of the changes argue the more prominently displayed dietary information may have just this effect, driving changes in the packaged foods marketplace. Firms may indeed feel the pressure with some companies considering changes to serving side or accelerating formula changes while well-positioned products may use their formulas as hero claims to gather disaffected consumers.
To read more about the proposed food label changes and the reasoning behind them take a look at this article at Tufts Now in the link below.

http://now.tufts.edu/articles/no-more-half-cup-servings-ice-cream
*Chart shows ranked discussion of traits by volume
^FDA insignia represent categories with proposed rule changes

datarank:

Proposed FDA Rule Changes Build on Consumer Discussion & May Portend Packaged Foods Market Changes

In an ongoing effort to combat obesity and promote public health the Obama administration is promoting proposed Food and Drug Administration changes to food labeling, the first significant changes since 1993.  The agency proposed the update on February 27th as the and among the proposed changes are:

Updated serving sizes to more accurately reflect actual consumption

Larger, bolded calorie count font

New daily values which are displayed first

A new category called “added sugar”

 To see how well these changes resonated with consumer concerns DataRank analyzed consumer conversations around nutrition labels on a sample of consumer-packaged goods to see which ingredients got the most attention.

Given the large concern around calories, serving size, and sugar, the proposed changes play into consumer’s go-to indicators of health.  One area of change which has generated little discussion is “recommended daily values”, or the average amount of any vitamin, chemical, or quantity a person should consume in a day, indicates consumers rely less on these pre-tabulated measures than the raw values provided on the label. The FDA’s proposed updates and more prominent position will likely serve to bring more consumer focus to the daily values while enhancing discussion on already important indicators. Overall, the food label update is hitting consumers’ concerns. Other concerns, such as genetically modified organism labeling, are still relatively far from the FDA’s rulemaking docket regardless of activist pressure.

The nutrition label update could herald changes in both consumer and producer behavior.  Consumers, already sensitive to caloric intake and the role of sugars in their diets, may shy away from products with added sugar or become even stricter calorie-counters as the information becomes more prominent. Companies could also feel the changes as consumer preferences adjust to new information and attention is drawn to parts of the label that previously received little more than a cursory glance. Advocates of the changes argue the more prominently displayed dietary information may have just this effect, driving changes in the packaged foods marketplace. Firms may indeed feel the pressure with some companies considering changes to serving side or accelerating formula changes while well-positioned products may use their formulas as hero claims to gather disaffected consumers.

To read more about the proposed food label changes and the reasoning behind them take a look at this article at Tufts Now in the link below.

http://now.tufts.edu/articles/no-more-half-cup-servings-ice-cream

*Chart shows ranked discussion of traits by volume

^FDA insignia represent categories with proposed rule changes

feastongood:

Backstage, Ryan Shadrick Wilson, General Counsel at Partnership for a Healthier America, discusses a public health crisis revolving around food and consumption. She shares what can be done to promote healthier eating habits in America along with some alarming statistics that are motivators to make change.

You can find her stage presentation on the subject here.

Join us:

http://feastongood.com
http://facebook.com/feastongood
http://twitter.com/feastongood


'Meat Atlas' charts a changing world of meat eaters
If anything is going to put you off eating meat, a map made out of a raw bloody steak might just do the trick.
That is the cover of the Meat Atlas, a yearly publication by the Heinrich Boell Foundation - a German environmental NGO - and Friends of the Earth. The first English version for the international market was released on Thursday.
But the Meat Atlas is not necessarily meant to turn you veggie - although the cover title “facts and figures about the animals we eat” might appear blunt to the more squeamish.
The aim is to inform consumers about the dangers of increasingly industrialised meat production, says Barbara Unmuessig, the foundation’s president, herself a self-confessed enjoyer of the occasional organic steak.
"In the rich North we already have high meat consumption. Now the poor South is catching up," she said. "Catering for this growing demand means industrialised farming methods: animals are pumped full of growth hormones. This has terrible consequences on how animals are treated and on the health of consumers."
In the United States more than 75kg (165lbs) of meat is consumed per person each year. In Germany that figure is around 60kg. Huge amounts compared to per capita meat consumption rates of 38kg in China, and less than 20kg in Africa.
But whereas in the developed world meat consumption has stabilised - or in some countries such as Germany, is even falling - in other parts of the world, particularly in India and China, consumers are taking enthusiastically to a meat-heavy Western diet.
There are social consequences, according to the Meat Atlas: the more meat we eat, the more animals we have to feed.
As a result increasing amounts of agricultural land are being given over to grow animal feed, such as soya. Globally 70% of arable land is now being used to grow food for animals, rather than food for people, says the Heinrich Boell Foundation.
This is undermining the fight against starvation and poverty, says Barbara Unmuessig, as individual farmers are pushed off their land by huge competitive corporations. And industrialised methods have led to an overuse of damaging chemicals, she believes.
Guilt-inducing
But Germans are torn.
On the one hand, this is a country with a powerful meat industry which slaughters 700 million animals a year - as well as a strong tradition of eating meat: wandering round chomping on a sausage is a normal part of most street festivals, and dried pieces of salami, wrapped in plastic wrappers like chocolate bars, are popular snacks.
German consumers are also used to the cheap food which is a direct result of industrial farming methods. The average German household spends around 10% of its entire income on food today, one of the lowest figures in the world, compared to more than 30% three decades ago.
More….
(From BBC News)

Graphic

'Meat Atlas' charts a changing world of meat eaters

If anything is going to put you off eating meat, a map made out of a raw bloody steak might just do the trick.

That is the cover of the Meat Atlas, a yearly publication by the Heinrich Boell Foundation - a German environmental NGO - and Friends of the Earth. The first English version for the international market was released on Thursday.

But the Meat Atlas is not necessarily meant to turn you veggie - although the cover title “facts and figures about the animals we eat” might appear blunt to the more squeamish.

The aim is to inform consumers about the dangers of increasingly industrialised meat production, says Barbara Unmuessig, the foundation’s president, herself a self-confessed enjoyer of the occasional organic steak.

"In the rich North we already have high meat consumption. Now the poor South is catching up," she said. "Catering for this growing demand means industrialised farming methods: animals are pumped full of growth hormones. This has terrible consequences on how animals are treated and on the health of consumers."

In the United States more than 75kg (165lbs) of meat is consumed per person each year. In Germany that figure is around 60kg. Huge amounts compared to per capita meat consumption rates of 38kg in China, and less than 20kg in Africa.

But whereas in the developed world meat consumption has stabilised - or in some countries such as Germany, is even falling - in other parts of the world, particularly in India and China, consumers are taking enthusiastically to a meat-heavy Western diet.

There are social consequences, according to the Meat Atlas: the more meat we eat, the more animals we have to feed.

As a result increasing amounts of agricultural land are being given over to grow animal feed, such as soya. Globally 70% of arable land is now being used to grow food for animals, rather than food for people, says the Heinrich Boell Foundation.

This is undermining the fight against starvation and poverty, says Barbara Unmuessig, as individual farmers are pushed off their land by huge competitive corporations. And industrialised methods have led to an overuse of damaging chemicals, she believes.

Guilt-inducing

But Germans are torn.

On the one hand, this is a country with a powerful meat industry which slaughters 700 million animals a year - as well as a strong tradition of eating meat: wandering round chomping on a sausage is a normal part of most street festivals, and dried pieces of salami, wrapped in plastic wrappers like chocolate bars, are popular snacks.

German consumers are also used to the cheap food which is a direct result of industrial farming methods. The average German household spends around 10% of its entire income on food today, one of the lowest figures in the world, compared to more than 30% three decades ago.

More….

(From BBC News)

Eating Better on a Budget: 10 Tips to Help you Stretch your Food Dollars(From the US Department of Agriculture)
Make Healthier Holiday Choices
(From USDA - US Department of Agriculture)