Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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nychealthyneighborhoods:

Shop Healthy Bronx
Attention Bronx residents! Shop Healthy Bronx, a program that works with communities – including residents, food retailers, and food suppliers and distributors – to increase access to healthy foods, is moving into East Tremont, Bronx this fall! As we move into this neighborhood, we want to work in partnership with you and your community groups to help transform the food environment…one store at a time!

You’re invited to attend a Shop Healthy Bronx meeting taking place on Thursday, September, 25th from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at 1932 Arthur Ave, Room 203, Bronx, NY 10457. 

At the meeting, you can share your opinions, network, and help decide how to make sure all members of your community have access to high-quality, healthy foods. 

Please RSVP to shophealthy@health.nyc.gov by Saturday, September 20, 2014.  If you cannot attend the meeting but are interested in participating, please contact us at shophealthy@health.nyc.gov . 

For more information about Shop Healthy Bronx, please click here. 

The Food Gap Is Widening
Wealthy people are eating better than ever, while the poor are eating worse.

By James Hamblin
Nutritional disparities between America’s rich and poor are growing, despite efforts to provide higher-quality food to people who most need it. So says a large study just released from the Harvard School of Public Health that examined eating habits of 29,124 Americans over the past decade. Diet quality has improved among people of high socioeconomic status but deteriorated among those at the other end of the spectrum. The gap between the two groups doubled between 2000 and 2010. That will be costly for everyone.
The primary conclusion of the study is interesting, though, in that its focus is diet quality among the population as a whole. Without accounting for socioeconomic status, there has been, the study reads, “steady improvement.” People aren’t eating more vegetables, or less red or processed meat, and their salt intake increased—which the researchers call “disconcerting”—but Americans are eating more good things like whole fruit, whole grains, nuts, legumes, and polyunsaturated fats.
Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard and one of the study’s authors, led with the good news when we spoke by phone.
“The good news is that the overall quality of the U.S. diet has been increasing in the past decade,” he said. Hu likened the study to a nutrition report card, saying that “the grade is not that great, kind of in the B- range.” (“Not that great” might be more like a C- or D+ by non-Harvard-professor standards.)

(More from The Atlantic)

The Food Gap Is Widening

Wealthy people are eating better than ever, while the poor are eating worse.
By James Hamblin

Nutritional disparities between America’s rich and poor are growing, despite efforts to provide higher-quality food to people who most need it. So says a large study just released from the Harvard School of Public Health that examined eating habits of 29,124 Americans over the past decade. Diet quality has improved among people of high socioeconomic status but deteriorated among those at the other end of the spectrum. The gap between the two groups doubled between 2000 and 2010. That will be costly for everyone.

The primary conclusion of the study is interesting, though, in that its focus is diet quality among the population as a whole. Without accounting for socioeconomic status, there has been, the study reads, “steady improvement.” People aren’t eating more vegetables, or less red or processed meat, and their salt intake increased—which the researchers call “disconcerting”—but Americans are eating more good things like whole fruit, whole grains, nuts, legumes, and polyunsaturated fats.

Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard and one of the study’s authors, led with the good news when we spoke by phone.

“The good news is that the overall quality of the U.S. diet has been increasing in the past decade,” he said. Hu likened the study to a nutrition report card, saying that “the grade is not that great, kind of in the B- range.” (“Not that great” might be more like a C- or D+ by non-Harvard-professor standards.)

(More from The Atlantic)
nychealthyneighborhoods:

nychealth:

Show us your favorite healthy fruits and vegetables by entering our #SoGoodNYC Facebook Photo Contest!
Text SOGOOD to 877877 to find a NYC farmers’ market near you.
Visit a market and snap a photo of your favorite fruit or vegetable.
Enter your photo by Sept 2nd:
Facebook: Like our Eat Healthy, Be Active Facebook page and upload your photo to our contest page: bit.ly/XA5CEy
Twitter: Post your photo using the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. You will receive a message from @nychealthy with a link to claim your photo. Follow the link and complete the form.
Instagram: Post your photo using the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. Share your Instagram photo on Twitter and include the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. You will receive a message from @nychealthy with a link to claim your photo. Follow the link and complete the form.
We’ll pick our top entry from each of the five boroughs, and you and everyone else can vote for your favorite citywide! 
Winners will have their photos posted at the farmers’ market where their photo was taken, and will receive a food-related incentive basket containing items such as a grater, spatula, t-shirt and/or tote bag!

Attention Brooklyn, Bronx, and Harlem residents! Take a picture of your favorite fruit or vegetable while you’re visiting your local farmers’ market this weekend! Post your photo on NYC Health’s Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram by using the #SoGoodNYC hashtag. We’ll pick top entries from all 5 boroughs for a chance to win a food-related gift bag!
Check out the details above. Good luck and have fun!

nychealthyneighborhoods:

nychealth:

Show us your favorite healthy fruits and vegetables by entering our #SoGoodNYC Facebook Photo Contest!

  1. Text SOGOOD to 877877 to find a NYC farmers’ market near you.
  2. Visit a market and snap a photo of your favorite fruit or vegetable.
  3. Enter your photo by Sept 2nd:

Facebook: Like our Eat Healthy, Be Active Facebook page and upload your photo to our contest page: bit.ly/XA5CEy

Twitter: Post your photo using the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. You will receive a message from @nychealthy with a link to claim your photo. Follow the link and complete the form.

Instagram: Post your photo using the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. Share your Instagram photo on Twitter and include the hashtag #SoGoodNYC. You will receive a message from @nychealthy with a link to claim your photo. Follow the link and complete the form.

We’ll pick our top entry from each of the five boroughs, and you and everyone else can vote for your favorite citywide!

Winners will have their photos posted at the farmers’ market where their photo was taken, and will receive a food-related incentive basket containing items such as a grater, spatula, t-shirt and/or tote bag!

Attention Brooklyn, Bronx, and Harlem residents! Take a picture of your favorite fruit or vegetable while you’re visiting your local farmers’ market this weekend! Post your photo on NYC Health’s Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram by using the #SoGoodNYC hashtag. We’ll pick top entries from all 5 boroughs for a chance to win a food-related gift bag!

Check out the details above. Good luck and have fun!

nychealthyneighborhoods:

Another way to eat fresh! Health Bucks are here!

Developed and distributed by the NYC Health Department, Health Bucks are $2 vouchers to purchase fresh fruit and vegetables at local farmers markets.

SNAP recipients can get greater purchasing power by using their EBT card at participating farmers markets.  For every $5 swiped off of a person’s EBT, he or she will receive a $2 Health Bucks.  That means, spend $5 but get $7, spend $10 but get $14!

Community organizations can also apply to receive Health Bucks to distribute to their clients and families.  Click here to download the Health Bucks application.  After the applications are reviewed, Health Bucks are distributed on a “first come, first serve” basis while supplies last.

npr:

School Lunch Debate: What’s At Stake?
School lunches have never been known for culinary excellence. But to be fair, the National School Lunch Program — which provides free or reduced lunches to about 31 million kids every day — has never aimed to dazzle as much as to fill little bellies.
Image: kcline/iStockphoto.com

npr:

School Lunch Debate: What’s At Stake?

School lunches have never been known for culinary excellence. But to be fair, the National School Lunch Program — which provides free or reduced lunches to about 31 million kids every day — has never aimed to dazzle as much as to fill little bellies.

Image: kcline/iStockphoto.com

Join the Food Revolution!

ottawahealth:

image

May 16th is the third annual Food Revolution Day. This day of action is led by award winning celebrity chef Jamie Oliver. Just like many in the healthcare community, Jamie Oliver noticed the lack of cooking skills in our modern-day society.  Food Revolution Day was created to raise awareness and help tackle this issue.

Let’s get people of all age groups cooking again!

Research is showing that people are buying more processed, pre-prepared and convenience foods. For many families, buying these ready-made foods has become the norm. This takes away from the traditional ‘from scratch’ cooking and food preparation skills that parents used to pass on to their children1. Without the opportunity to observe and practice ‘from scratch’ cooking at home, how will our children learn to cook for themselves?

We shouldn’t underestimate the importance of starting early in teaching children how-to prepare good food from scratch. Showing children that cooking can be fun will serve them well as they learn to live healthier lives!

Read More

ottawahealth:

image

For many people, the term “daycare food” conjures up images of hotdogs, canned soup and bologna sandwiches. In recent years, a growing number of concerned operators and chefs have taken a fresh look at what’s on their daycare menus. The result? More and more centres are experimenting with…

5 Sugar Shockers: What’s In Your Favorite Foods?
"

You may be indulging your sweet tooth without even knowing it. Sugar is hiding in places most people don’t expect — including the surprising foods in this infographic.

Sugar shockers infographic

(via allheartcare)
datarank:

Proposed FDA Rule Changes Build on Consumer Discussion & May Portend Packaged Foods Market Changes
In an ongoing effort to combat obesity and promote public health the Obama administration is promoting proposed Food and Drug Administration changes to food labeling, the first significant changes since 1993.  The agency proposed the update on February 27th as the and among the proposed changes are:
Updated serving sizes to more accurately reflect actual consumption
Larger, bolded calorie count font
New daily values which are displayed first
A new category called “added sugar”
 To see how well these changes resonated with consumer concerns DataRank analyzed consumer conversations around nutrition labels on a sample of consumer-packaged goods to see which ingredients got the most attention.
Given the large concern around calories, serving size, and sugar, the proposed changes play into consumer’s go-to indicators of health.  One area of change which has generated little discussion is “recommended daily values”, or the average amount of any vitamin, chemical, or quantity a person should consume in a day, indicates consumers rely less on these pre-tabulated measures than the raw values provided on the label. The FDA’s proposed updates and more prominent position will likely serve to bring more consumer focus to the daily values while enhancing discussion on already important indicators. Overall, the food label update is hitting consumers’ concerns. Other concerns, such as genetically modified organism labeling, are still relatively far from the FDA’s rulemaking docket regardless of activist pressure.
The nutrition label update could herald changes in both consumer and producer behavior.  Consumers, already sensitive to caloric intake and the role of sugars in their diets, may shy away from products with added sugar or become even stricter calorie-counters as the information becomes more prominent. Companies could also feel the changes as consumer preferences adjust to new information and attention is drawn to parts of the label that previously received little more than a cursory glance. Advocates of the changes argue the more prominently displayed dietary information may have just this effect, driving changes in the packaged foods marketplace. Firms may indeed feel the pressure with some companies considering changes to serving side or accelerating formula changes while well-positioned products may use their formulas as hero claims to gather disaffected consumers.
To read more about the proposed food label changes and the reasoning behind them take a look at this article at Tufts Now in the link below.

http://now.tufts.edu/articles/no-more-half-cup-servings-ice-cream
*Chart shows ranked discussion of traits by volume
^FDA insignia represent categories with proposed rule changes

datarank:

Proposed FDA Rule Changes Build on Consumer Discussion & May Portend Packaged Foods Market Changes

In an ongoing effort to combat obesity and promote public health the Obama administration is promoting proposed Food and Drug Administration changes to food labeling, the first significant changes since 1993.  The agency proposed the update on February 27th as the and among the proposed changes are:

Updated serving sizes to more accurately reflect actual consumption

Larger, bolded calorie count font

New daily values which are displayed first

A new category called “added sugar”

 To see how well these changes resonated with consumer concerns DataRank analyzed consumer conversations around nutrition labels on a sample of consumer-packaged goods to see which ingredients got the most attention.

Given the large concern around calories, serving size, and sugar, the proposed changes play into consumer’s go-to indicators of health.  One area of change which has generated little discussion is “recommended daily values”, or the average amount of any vitamin, chemical, or quantity a person should consume in a day, indicates consumers rely less on these pre-tabulated measures than the raw values provided on the label. The FDA’s proposed updates and more prominent position will likely serve to bring more consumer focus to the daily values while enhancing discussion on already important indicators. Overall, the food label update is hitting consumers’ concerns. Other concerns, such as genetically modified organism labeling, are still relatively far from the FDA’s rulemaking docket regardless of activist pressure.

The nutrition label update could herald changes in both consumer and producer behavior.  Consumers, already sensitive to caloric intake and the role of sugars in their diets, may shy away from products with added sugar or become even stricter calorie-counters as the information becomes more prominent. Companies could also feel the changes as consumer preferences adjust to new information and attention is drawn to parts of the label that previously received little more than a cursory glance. Advocates of the changes argue the more prominently displayed dietary information may have just this effect, driving changes in the packaged foods marketplace. Firms may indeed feel the pressure with some companies considering changes to serving side or accelerating formula changes while well-positioned products may use their formulas as hero claims to gather disaffected consumers.

To read more about the proposed food label changes and the reasoning behind them take a look at this article at Tufts Now in the link below.

http://now.tufts.edu/articles/no-more-half-cup-servings-ice-cream

*Chart shows ranked discussion of traits by volume

^FDA insignia represent categories with proposed rule changes

feastongood:

Backstage, Ryan Shadrick Wilson, General Counsel at Partnership for a Healthier America, discusses a public health crisis revolving around food and consumption. She shares what can be done to promote healthier eating habits in America along with some alarming statistics that are motivators to make change.

You can find her stage presentation on the subject here.

Join us:

http://feastongood.com
http://facebook.com/feastongood
http://twitter.com/feastongood