Hackers Track Their Vital Signs. Sounds Cool, But TMI?
Large-scale data mining in health care sounds scary, but dial back that fear for a minute. What about mining your own data to make informed decisions about your day-to-day health?
Programmers all over have been fiddling around with code to find the best ways to help people gather, share and display their personal data on online dashboards. One such app in the making that’s been lighting up the Internet this week is being designed by professional software developer and hobbyist .
My first thought when I saw this was that my mother would love it — to keep tabs on me. The elegantly simple display is easy to understand, and would allow my mother to check in on my heart rate from hundreds of miles away. She’d be reassured by a little beating heart icon that I’m still alive.
I loved it, too. The idea of controlling an overflowing arsenal of mineable, continuously updated information all about me — well, that’s just too cool. Am I merely swooning with coder envy, I wondered, or is this possibly the next big thing in personal health?
(From Shots- Health News from NPR)
Hackers Track Their Vital Signs. Sounds Cool, But TMI?

Large-scale data mining in health care sounds scary, but dial back that fear for a minute. What about mining your own data to make informed decisions about your day-to-day health?

Programmers all over have been fiddling around with code to find the best ways to help people gather, share and display their personal data on online dashboards. One such app in the making that’s been lighting up the Internet this week is being designed by professional software developer and hobbyist .

My first thought when I saw this was that my mother would love it — to keep tabs on me. The elegantly simple display is easy to understand, and would allow my mother to check in on my heart rate from hundreds of miles away. She’d be reassured by a little beating heart icon that I’m still alive.

I loved it, too. The idea of controlling an overflowing arsenal of mineable, continuously updated information all about me — well, that’s just too cool. Am I merely swooning with coder envy, I wondered, or is this possibly the next big thing in personal health?

(From Shots- Health News from NPR)

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The Surge of Data in Healthcare- GOOD Partnerships and Matt Chase contributed in Figures Of Progress, Technology and Healthcare

We know that data is all around us. Each time you make a web search, turn on your car or even scan your rewards card at the grocery store, data is being collected. But there’s one industry where there is a lot of data being gathered, and most of it isn’t being used.
In the healthcare sector, 80 percent of patient data is unstructured—meaning it’s not being organized in a predefined manner. The Center for Disease Control estimates 42 percent of all physicians have an electronic health record system that meets federal standards, but in the healthcare field especially there are many hand written notes and charts, which can’t be easily processed by traditional computer programs.

Continue reading on good.is

good:

The Surge of Data in Healthcare
GOOD Partnerships and Matt Chase contributed in Figures Of Progress, Technology and Healthcare

We know that data is all around us. Each time you make a web search, turn on your car or even scan your rewards card at the grocery store, data is being collected. But there’s one industry where there is a lot of data being gathered, and most of it isn’t being used.

In the healthcare sector, 80 percent of patient data is unstructured—meaning it’s not being organized in a predefined manner. The Center for Disease Control estimates 42 percent of all physicians have an electronic health record system that meets federal standards, but in the healthcare field especially there are many hand written notes and charts, which can’t be easily processed by traditional computer programs.

Continue reading on good.is

New York’s Statewide Patient Portal Design Challenge Winners Announced!
This is the winner design from Mana Health

Expert judges awarded top three designs for statewide website where New Yorkers will soon be able to access their healthcare records

New York, NY – The New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC) announced today the winners of its Design Challenge for the Patient Portal for New Yorkers. Mana Health placed first, iHealthNY second, and MyHealthProfile third and will be awarded $15,000, $7,500, and $2,500 respectively.

The Patient Portal for New Yorkers project is to build a website, through which New Yorkers across the state will be able to access all of their medical records from their various healthcare providers safely and securely. To create the most innovative and user-friendly portal design, NYeC launched a Design Challenge earlier this year, asking designers to submit portal prototypes. Then in April, the general public was asked to vote on which design submissions they liked best. Thousands of New Yorkers cast their votes and selected the nine remaining finalists.

The Patient Portal for New Yorkers will begin to be available to the public in 2014.

Key Features of the Portal Will Allow Patients To:

  • Easily access their healthcare records whenever they want them. For example, to find out when they started taking a particular medication, when they had their last tetanus shot, or to view recent lab results.
  • Share their records with providers—such as to get a second opinion on a diagnosis or share data from a specialist with their family doctor.
  • Select and control who is allowed to have access to their medical history.
  • Be more empowered in their healthcare management and better able to partner with doctors in their care.

 
About The New York eHealth Collaborative (NYeC): NYeC is a not-for-profit organization, working in partnership with the New York State Department of Health to improve healthcare for all New Yorkers through health information technology (health IT). Founded in 2006 by healthcare leaders, NYeC receives funding from state and federal grants to serve as the focal point for health IT in the State of New York. NYeC works to develop policies and standards, to assist healthcare providers in making the shift to electronic health records, and to coordinate the creation of the Statewide Health Information Network of New York (SHIN-NY), a network to connect healthcare providers statewide. For more information about NYeC, visit www.nyehealth.org and @NYeHealth.


NPIN’s In the Know: Twitter for Public Health Webcast 2013
by CDC NPIN  on Feb 20, 2013



Slides from the first of six interactive webcasts in the series, In the Know: Social Media for Public Health. Each webcast focuses on a different social media channel and provides basic information, tips, success stories, and discussion on how best to use social media to promote public health and expand outreach initiatives.
(From CDC National Prevention Information Network- CDC NPIN)

NPIN’s In the Know: Twitter for Public Health Webcast 2013 by CDC NPIN on Feb 20, 2013

Slides from the first of six interactive webcasts in the series, In the Know: Social Media for Public Health. Each webcast focuses on a different social media channel and provides basic information, tips, success stories, and discussion on how best to use social media to promote public health and expand outreach initiatives.

(From CDC National Prevention Information Network- CDC NPIN)


New CDC App Turns You Into A Disease Outbreak Detective
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released a free app for the iPad called “Solve the Outbreak.”
The app allows users to become an Epidemic Intelligence Service agent and examine a range of variables, based on factual information, in a burgeoning disease outbreak and make decisions much as a CDC decision-maker would. Should you quarantine the city?  Interview people who are sick? Request more results from the lab?
According to the CDC, the app comes with three outbreak scenarios, with more coming soon. Users can post their scores on Twitter and Facebook and challenge friends to do a better job at stemming the epidemic and saving more lives.
The agency says it is using social media to educate the public about diseases and to promote an appreciation for public health work.
You can download the free app from iTunes.

iPad Screenshot 2

New CDC App Turns You Into A Disease Outbreak Detective

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released a free app for the iPad called “Solve the Outbreak.”

The app allows users to become an Epidemic Intelligence Service agent and examine a range of variables, based on factual information, in a burgeoning disease outbreak and make decisions much as a CDC decision-maker would. Should you quarantine the city?  Interview people who are sick? Request more results from the lab?

According to the CDC, the app comes with three outbreak scenarios, with more coming soon. Users can post their scores on Twitter and Facebook and challenge friends to do a better job at stemming the epidemic and saving more lives.

The agency says it is using social media to educate the public about diseases and to promote an appreciation for public health work.

You can download the free app from iTunes.


Physicians like mobile health apps for patient health – eClinicalWorks on transformational path
A vast majority – 9 in 10 physicians – like mobile health (mHealth) apps, especially when tied to electronic health records (EHRs). eClinicalWorks surveyed physicians in January 2013, and found physicians bullish on mobile health apps for patient benefit – not just for their own office productivity and workflow.
(From HealthPopuli)
http://healthpopuli.com/2013/02/19/physicians-like-mobile-health-apps-for-patient-health-eclinicalworks-on-transformational-path/

Physicians like mobile health apps for patient health – eClinicalWorks on transformational path

A vast majority – 9 in 10 physicians – like mobile health (mHealth) apps, especially when tied to electronic health records (EHRs). eClinicalWorks surveyed physicians in January 2013, and found physicians bullish on mobile health apps for patient benefit – not just for their own office productivity and workflow.

(From HealthPopuli)

http://healthpopuli.com/2013/02/19/physicians-like-mobile-health-apps-for-patient-health-eclinicalworks-on-transformational-path/

Fighting cancer with cell phones: Innovation to save lives in Africa
(CNN) — Only innovation can reduce illness and poverty in Africa, according to a program that is funding creative approaches to healthcare in developing countries.
More than 50,000 women die each year of cervical cancer in Africa, according to World Health Organization estimates, as more than 80% of the cases are detected in late stages.
In countries such as Tanzania, where nearly 4,500 women die annually from the disease, the problem is exacerbated by an acute shortage of medical experts and a lack of quality screening services, especially in rural areas.
But now a group of Canadian and Tanzanian health innovators have joined forces to apply simple and safe mobile technologies to improve cervical cancer screening and thus potentially reduce mortality rates in the East African country.
The idea is to send teams of two trained non-physician healthcare workers in remote Tanzania to examine women living several hours away from health centers. The nurses, who will be equipped with cervical screening and treatment tools as well as standard smartphones, will take a photograph of the cervix with their phone and send it via SMS to a medical expert in a specialized clinic.
Trained doctors will then be able to review the image immediately and text the diagnosis back to the health worker, as well as give instructions about treatment.
(From CNN - Inside Africa)
Fighting cancer with cell phones: Innovation to save lives in Africa

(CNN) — Only innovation can reduce illness and poverty in Africa, according to a program that is funding creative approaches to healthcare in developing countries.

More than 50,000 women die each year of cervical cancer in Africa, according to World Health Organization estimates, as more than 80% of the cases are detected in late stages.

In countries such as Tanzania, where nearly 4,500 women die annually from the disease, the problem is exacerbated by an acute shortage of medical experts and a lack of quality screening services, especially in rural areas.

But now a group of Canadian and Tanzanian health innovators have joined forces to apply simple and safe mobile technologies to improve cervical cancer screening and thus potentially reduce mortality rates in the East African country.

The idea is to send teams of two trained non-physician healthcare workers in remote Tanzania to examine women living several hours away from health centers. The nurses, who will be equipped with cervical screening and treatment tools as well as standard smartphones, will take a photograph of the cervix with their phone and send it via SMS to a medical expert in a specialized clinic.

Trained doctors will then be able to review the image immediately and text the diagnosis back to the health worker, as well as give instructions about treatment.

(From CNN - Inside Africa)

ASPR Twitter challenge sparks innovation in tracking local health trends
New web-based app leverages Twitter for real-time early warning of disease outbreaks
Local public health officials can use a free new Web-based application, MappyHealth , to track health concerns in real time in their communities using Twitter, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) announced Thursday (9/13).
ASPR Twitter challenge sparks innovation in tracking local health trends

New web-based app leverages Twitter for real-time early warning of disease outbreaks

Local public health officials can use a free new Web-based application, MappyHealth Exit disclaimer icon, to track health concerns in real time in their communities using Twitter, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) announced Thursday (9/13).