Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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breastfeedingisbeautiful:

Nursing in Public laws by State. Is it legal where you live?

breastfeedingisbeautiful:

Nursing in Public laws by State. Is it legal where you live?

peacecorps:

It is easy to romanticize a life with limited connectivity: candles, campfires and conversations. And how creative of the Ugandans to keep their insulin floating in a ceramic pot buried in the dirt. But the reality is that the only difference between the boy in southwest Uganda and the boy in anytown, USA is one was born powerless, the other empowered at birth. The Oxford dictionary defines power as “the ability or capacity to do something.” It is how things get done.

Picture this: A tale of two babies - ONE.org

fairyjerbear:

Cartoon: Outbreaks in America
Another great political cartoon, this one from Brian McFadden appearing in the Daily Kos, looks at all the other “outbreaks” of concern beyond the one the media is focused on…

fairyjerbear:

Cartoon: Outbreaks in America

Another great political cartoon, this one from Brian McFadden appearing in the Daily Kos, looks at all the other “outbreaks” of concern beyond the one the media is focused on…

International Road Safety

Road-related accidents are the #1 cause of preventable death in healthy US travelers.

Costly Mistake: Nearly half of medical evacuations back to the United States are the result of a car crash. A medical evacuation can cost more than $100,000.

A staggering 25,000 deaths resulting from vehicle-related accidents are tourists.

Don’t be another statistic. Eight simple steps to minimize your risk:

Always wear a seat belt and put children in car seats.
When possible, avoid riding in a car in a developing country at night.
Don’t ride motorcycles. If you must ride a motorcycle, wear a helmet.
Know local traffic laws before you get behind the wheel.
Don’t drink and drive.
Ride only in marked taxis with seatbelts.
Be alert when crossing the street, especially in countries where people drive on the left.
Avoid overcrowded, overweight, or top-heavy buses or vans.
(From CDC)

International Road Safety

Road-related accidents are the #1 cause of preventable death in healthy US travelers.

Costly Mistake: Nearly half of medical evacuations back to the United States are the result of a car crash. A medical evacuation can cost more than $100,000.

A staggering 25,000 deaths resulting from vehicle-related accidents are tourists.

Don’t be another statistic. Eight simple steps to minimize your risk:

  1. Always wear a seat belt and put children in car seats.
  2. When possible, avoid riding in a car in a developing country at night.
  3. Don’t ride motorcycles. If you must ride a motorcycle, wear a helmet.
  4. Know local traffic laws before you get behind the wheel.
  5. Don’t drink and drive.
  6. Ride only in marked taxis with seatbelts.
  7. Be alert when crossing the street, especially in countries where people drive on the left.
  8. Avoid overcrowded, overweight, or top-heavy buses or vans.

(From CDC)

Behind Toledo’s Water Crisis, a Long-Troubled Lake Erie
TOLEDO, Ohio — It took a serendipitous slug of toxins and the loss of drinking water for a half-million residents to bring home what scientists and government officials in this part of the country have been saying for years: Lake Erie is in trouble, and getting worse by the year.
Flooded by tides of phosphorus washed from fertilized farms, cattle feedlots and leaky septic systems, the most intensely developed of the Great Lakes is increasingly being choked each summer by thick mats of algae, much of it poisonous. What plagues Toledo and, experts say, potentially all 11 million lakeside residents, is increasingly a serious problem across the United States.

But while there is talk of action — and particularly in Ohio, real action — there also is widespread agreement that efforts to address the problem have fallen woefully short. And the troubles are not restricted to the Great Lakes. Poisonous algae are found in polluted inland lakes from Minnesota to Nebraska to California, and even in the glacial-era kettle ponds of Cape Cod in Massachusetts.
(More from The New York Times)

Behind Toledo’s Water Crisis, a Long-Troubled Lake Erie

TOLEDO, Ohio — It took a serendipitous slug of toxins and the loss of drinking water for a half-million residents to bring home what scientists and government officials in this part of the country have been saying for years: Lake Erie is in trouble, and getting worse by the year.

Flooded by tides of phosphorus washed from fertilized farms, cattle feedlots and leaky septic systems, the most intensely developed of the Great Lakes is increasingly being choked each summer by thick mats of algae, much of it poisonous. What plagues Toledo and, experts say, potentially all 11 million lakeside residents, is increasingly a serious problem across the United States.

But while there is talk of action — and particularly in Ohio, real action — there also is widespread agreement that efforts to address the problem have fallen woefully short. And the troubles are not restricted to the Great Lakes. Poisonous algae are found in polluted inland lakes from Minnesota to Nebraska to California, and even in the glacial-era kettle ponds of Cape Cod in Massachusetts.

(More from The New York Times)

Doctor with Ebola arrives at U.S. hospital for treatment

American Kent Brantly was “extremely stable” during his flight from Liberia aboard the converted “air ambulance.”

(From The Washington Post)
 Dr. Kent Brantly, right, arrived at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta on Saturday.  Credit WSB-TV, via Associated Press  
American Doctor With Ebola Arrives in U.S. for Treatment
ATLANTA — The first of two American aid workers infected with Ebola while working in West Africa arrived in the United States on Saturday aboard a private air ambulance specially equipped to isolate patients with infectious diseases and was quickly admitted to a hospital here.
The jet carrying Dr. Kent Brantly, who is believed to be the first patient with the deadly virus ever to be treated at a hospital in the United States, landed at Dobbins Air Reserve Base around 11 a.m.
With news helicopters flying overhead, a police-escorted ambulance carrying Dr. Brantly arrived about 90 minutes later at Emory University Hospital, which has a containment unit for patients with dangerous infectious diseases. The unit was built more than a decade ago with consultation from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which has its headquarters nearby.
(More from The New York Times)

Dr. Kent Brantly, right, arrived at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta on Saturday. Credit WSB-TV, via Associated Press

American Doctor With Ebola Arrives in U.S. for Treatment

ATLANTA — The first of two American aid workers infected with Ebola while working in West Africa arrived in the United States on Saturday aboard a private air ambulance specially equipped to isolate patients with infectious diseases and was quickly admitted to a hospital here.

The jet carrying Dr. Kent Brantly, who is believed to be the first patient with the deadly virus ever to be treated at a hospital in the United States, landed at Dobbins Air Reserve Base around 11 a.m.

With news helicopters flying overhead, a police-escorted ambulance carrying Dr. Brantly arrived about 90 minutes later at Emory University Hospital, which has a containment unit for patients with dangerous infectious diseases. The unit was built more than a decade ago with consultation from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which has its headquarters nearby.

(More from The New York Times)

Americans More Likely to Avoid Drinking Soda Than Before
July 28, 2014
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Nearly two-thirds of Americans say they avoid soda in their diet, while more than half say they avoid sugar. Meanwhile, more than nine in 10 Americans claim they try to include fruits (92%) or vegetables (93%) in their diet — slightly more than said this previously.
These data are from a July 7-10 Gallup poll that asked Americans about their consumption habits. Americans have become increasingly wary of drinking soda since Gallup began asking them about their dietary choices in 2002. At that time, only 41% said they actively tried to avoid soda, a percentage that has now jumped to 63%.
Studies continue to reveal the adverse health effects of consuming soda, and high-profile attempts to ban the purchase of large individual servings of soda or to tax it have apparently raised Americans’ consciousness about drinking it, even if closer to half still consume the beverage. At this point, 13% of Americans say they don’t think about soda intake, down from 24% a decade ago.
(From Gallup)

Americans More Likely to Avoid Drinking Soda Than Before

July 28, 2014

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Nearly two-thirds of Americans say they avoid soda in their diet, while more than half say they avoid sugar. Meanwhile, more than nine in 10 Americans claim they try to include fruits (92%) or vegetables (93%) in their diet — slightly more than said this previously.

These data are from a July 7-10 Gallup poll that asked Americans about their consumption habits. Americans have become increasingly wary of drinking soda since Gallup began asking them about their dietary choices in 2002. At that time, only 41% said they actively tried to avoid soda, a percentage that has now jumped to 63%.

Studies continue to reveal the adverse health effects of consuming soda, and high-profile attempts to ban the purchase of large individual servings of soda or to tax it have apparently raised Americans’ consciousness about drinking it, even if closer to half still consume the beverage. At this point, 13% of Americans say they don’t think about soda intake, down from 24% a decade ago.

(From Gallup)

postgraphics:

Tobacco smoking in the U.S.
Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.

postgraphics:

Tobacco smoking in the U.S.

Americans have been smoking fewer cigarettes every year for nearly 50 years running, but some states, age groups and demographics have been better about kicking the habit, or never even picking up the butt.

Gaining Ground: Americans’ Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care After the Affordable Care Act’s First Open Enrollment Period
Overview
A new Commonwealth Fund survey finds that in the wake of the Affordable Care Act’s first open enrollment period, significantly fewer working-age adults are uninsured than just before the sign-up period began, and many have used their new coverage to obtain needed care.
What do Americans think about their Obamacare coverage? Quick view
The uninsured rate for people ages 19 to 64 declined from 20 percent in the July-to-September 2013 period to 15 percent in the April-to-June 2014 period. An estimated 9.5 million fewer adults were uninsured. Young men and women drove a large part of the decline: the uninsured rate for 19-to-34-year-olds declined from 28 percent to 18 percent, with an estimated 5.7 million fewer young adults uninsured. By June, 60 percent of adults with new coverage through the marketplaces or Medicaid reported they had visited a doctor or hospital or filled a prescription; of these, 62 percent said they could not have accessed or afforded this care previously.
(More from The Commonwealth Fund)

Gaining Ground: Americans’ Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care After the Affordable Care Act’s First Open Enrollment Period

Overview

A new Commonwealth Fund survey finds that in the wake of the Affordable Care Act’s first open enrollment period, significantly fewer working-age adults are uninsured than just before the sign-up period began, and many have used their new coverage to obtain needed care.

What do Americans think about their Obamacare coverage? Quick view

The uninsured rate for people ages 19 to 64 declined from 20 percent in the July-to-September 2013 period to 15 percent in the April-to-June 2014 period. An estimated 9.5 million fewer adults were uninsured. Young men and women drove a large part of the decline: the uninsured rate for 19-to-34-year-olds declined from 28 percent to 18 percent, with an estimated 5.7 million fewer young adults uninsured. By June, 60 percent of adults with new coverage through the marketplaces or Medicaid reported they had visited a doctor or hospital or filled a prescription; of these, 62 percent said they could not have accessed or afforded this care previously.

(More from The Commonwealth Fund)