Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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nprglobalhealth:

He Fixed South Africa’s AIDS Policy, Now He’s Out To Fight Salt
Dr. Aaron Motsoaledi had arrived in the U.S. for a two-week visit. “I’m here to meet influential people,” he says energetically despite having just gotten off a transatlantic flight.
Motsoaledi became the South African Minister of Health in 2009. He took over a national health system attempting to deal with the worst HIV/AIDS epidemic in the world, with nearly 30 million cases. His highly controversial predecessor, Manto Tshabalala-Msimang, was possibly best-known for claiming that AIDS could be cured with a cocktail of garlic and beetroot.
Tshabalala-Msimang was forced out in September 2008 and briefly replaced by an interim minister. Then Motsoaledi took over. Here are excerpts from his conversation with NPR.
Motsoaledi oversaw the expansion of anti-retroviral drug treatment for HIV to public clinics across South Africa.
Motsoaledi: “One of the weaknesses in South Africa [in the past] was a wrong HIV/AIDS policy. I’m sure you know about that. It’s legendary. So we started five years ago to put together huge programs on HIV/AIDS. That’s why now our program is one of the biggest in world. Thirty percent of all the people who are in treatment for HIV in the world are in one program — the South Africa program. It’s huge, but we’re actually planning to double it in the next 24 months. Now it’s got 2.4 million people on treatment. We want to raise it to 4.6 million people in the next 24 months.”
Continue reading.
Photo: South Africa Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi has no patience for people who abuse their health and expect the government to fix things. (Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images)

nprglobalhealth:

He Fixed South Africa’s AIDS Policy, Now He’s Out To Fight Salt

Dr. Aaron Motsoaledi had arrived in the U.S. for a two-week visit. “I’m here to meet influential people,” he says energetically despite having just gotten off a transatlantic flight.

Motsoaledi became the South African Minister of Health in 2009. He took over a national health system attempting to deal with the worst HIV/AIDS epidemic in the world, with nearly 30 million cases. His highly controversial predecessor, Manto Tshabalala-Msimang, was possibly best-known for claiming that AIDS could be cured with a cocktail of garlic and beetroot.

Tshabalala-Msimang was forced out in September 2008 and briefly replaced by an interim minister. Then Motsoaledi took over. Here are excerpts from his conversation with NPR.

Motsoaledi oversaw the expansion of anti-retroviral drug treatment for HIV to public clinics across South Africa.

Motsoaledi: “One of the weaknesses in South Africa [in the past] was a wrong HIV/AIDS policy. I’m sure you know about that. It’s legendary. So we started five years ago to put together huge programs on HIV/AIDS. That’s why now our program is one of the biggest in world. Thirty percent of all the people who are in treatment for HIV in the world are in one program — the South Africa program. It’s huge, but we’re actually planning to double it in the next 24 months. Now it’s got 2.4 million people on treatment. We want to raise it to 4.6 million people in the next 24 months.”

Continue reading.

Photo: South Africa Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi has no patience for people who abuse their health and expect the government to fix things. (Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images)

pulitzercenter:

image

Antiretroviral therapy has saved the lives of over seven million people living with HIV. Yet vulnerable populations still fall through the cracks. Groups like LGBT people, sex workers, and people who inject drugs have limited access to HIV prevention and treatment services. These gaps threaten the gains that have been made in the global fight against AIDS. View the Pulitzer Center’s latest interactive map.  

Using Soccer to Empower Young Women

SKILLZ Street (SS) is an all-girls soccer-based programme developed by Grassroot Soccer (GRS) that combines HIV educational activities, sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) knowledge, and soccer. SS also partners with the Thuthuzela Care Center (TCC) for medical and social services.

(From GOOD-The GOOD Pioneers of Health: Africa Edition)

nprglobalhealth:

Fake Cures For AIDS Have A Long And Dreadful History
Electromagnetism can detect AIDS. The “Complete Cure Device” can wipe out the virus.
The Egyptian military made those claims earlier this year, but now they have backtracked after the announcement was widely denounced by scientists, including Egypt’s own science adviser.
Nonetheless, people are still eager to believe the unbelievable. Egypt’s announcement prompted 70,000 people to send emails asking to try the new treatment.
The Complete Cure Device is just one more false promise in the ongoing fight against AIDS. It is a reminder, too, that for 15 years, beginning in the early 1980s, AIDS was a slaughter, shrouded in mystery, of people in the prime of their lives.
Then came a breakthrough in 1996: A combination of drugs could control the virus, allowing infected people to live long and productive lives. Today, antiretroviral treatment for HIV and AIDS is widely available. An outright cure still eludes scientists, but the once deadly disease has become manageable.
So any claim for an unproven cure, offering hope that could deter patients from effective treatment, is cruel. But myths, false claims and outright fraud have persisted in the AIDS epidemic.
Continue reading.
Photo: Over a decade ago, rumors spread in South Africa that sex with a virgin could cure HIV/AIDS. In 2001, 150 people gathered in Cape Town to protest the rape of children and even babies, allegedly as a result of belief in this canard. (Anna Zieminski/AFP/Getty Images)

nprglobalhealth:

Fake Cures For AIDS Have A Long And Dreadful History

Electromagnetism can detect AIDS. The “Complete Cure Device” can wipe out the virus.

The Egyptian military made those claims earlier this year, but now they have backtracked after the announcement was widely denounced by scientists, including Egypt’s own science adviser.

Nonetheless, people are still eager to believe the unbelievable. Egypt’s announcement prompted 70,000 people to send emails asking to try the new treatment.

The Complete Cure Device is just one more false promise in the ongoing fight against AIDS. It is a reminder, too, that for 15 years, beginning in the early 1980s, AIDS was a slaughter, shrouded in mystery, of people in the prime of their lives.

Then came a breakthrough in 1996: A combination of drugs could control the virus, allowing infected people to live long and productive lives. Today, antiretroviral treatment for HIV and AIDS is widely available. An outright cure still eludes scientists, but the once deadly disease has become manageable.

So any claim for an unproven cure, offering hope that could deter patients from effective treatment, is cruel. But myths, false claims and outright fraud have persisted in the AIDS epidemic.

Continue reading.

Photo: Over a decade ago, rumors spread in South Africa that sex with a virgin could cure HIV/AIDS. In 2001, 150 people gathered in Cape Town to protest the rape of children and even babies, allegedly as a result of belief in this canard. (Anna Zieminski/AFP/Getty Images)


Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

 
Daily PrEP to Prevent HIV
PrEP − Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis − is a daily pill that can help you stay HIV-negative. The medicines in PrEP can protect you before you might be exposed to HIV.
The Basics
Consider PrEP. PrEP is for HIV-negative people who are at risk of being exposed to HIV through sex or injecting drugs and who are ready to take a daily pill.
Talk to Your Doctor. You need to speak with a doctor or nurse before you start using PrEP. Your doctor or nurse can help you decide if PrEP is right for you. These clinics can help you get PrEP. Providers at these clinics can help you decide if PrEP is right for you.
Take PrEP Every Day. PrEP is taken daily in pill form. Do not skip a dose. PrEP works much better at stopping HIV if you take it every day.
Know the Common Side Effects. PrEP can have mild side effects, like stomach pain, weight loss and headaches, especially at the beginning of treatment. PrEP may not be right for everyone. Talk to your doctor.
Use Condoms. Even if you take PrEP daily, condoms give you additional protection against HIV, other sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancy.
Know the Common Side Effects. PrEP can have mild side effects, like stomach pain, weight loss and headaches, especially at the beginning of treatment. PrEP may not be right for everyone. Talk to your doctor.
Find Out about Paying for PrEP. Many insurance plans including Medicaid cover PrEP. Assistance may be available if you are uninsured.
Know about PEP. PrEP is not an emergency medication. If you think you were recently exposed to HIV, you may need emergency PEP.
(From New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)

PrEP can be used by gay and bisexual men, heterosexuals, people who inject drugs and transgender women.

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)


Daily PrEP to Prevent HIV

PrEP − Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis is a daily pill that can help you stay HIV-negative. The medicines in PrEP can protect you before you might be exposed to HIV.

The Basics

  • Consider PrEP. PrEP is for HIV-negative people who are at risk of being exposed to HIV through sex or injecting drugs and who are ready to take a daily pill.
  • Talk to Your Doctor. You need to speak with a doctor or nurse before you start using PrEP. Your doctor or nurse can help you decide if PrEP is right for you. These clinics can help you get PrEP. Providers at these clinics can help you decide if PrEP is right for you.
  • Take PrEP Every Day. PrEP is taken daily in pill form. Do not skip a dose. PrEP works much better at stopping HIV if you take it every day.
  • Know the Common Side Effects. PrEP can have mild side effects, like stomach pain, weight loss and headaches, especially at the beginning of treatment. PrEP may not be right for everyone. Talk to your doctor.
  • Use Condoms. Even if you take PrEP daily, condoms give you additional protection against HIV, other sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancy.
  • Know the Common Side Effects. PrEP can have mild side effects, like stomach pain, weight loss and headaches, especially at the beginning of treatment. PrEP may not be right for everyone. Talk to your doctor.
  • Find Out about Paying for PrEP. Many insurance plans including Medicaid cover PrEP. Assistance may be available if you are uninsured.
  • Know about PEP. PrEP is not an emergency medication. If you think you were recently exposed to HIV, you may need emergency PEP.

(From New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene)

nprglobalhealth:

Legalizing Prostitution Would Protect Sex Workers From HIV
If prostitution were legal around the world, the transmission of HIV among female sex workers would go down by at least a third, according to a paper presented at the International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia.
That would be a huge step forward. “Sex workers face a disproportionately large burden of HIV,” the paper notes.
Goats and Soda spoke to Dr. Kate Shannon, director of the Gender and Sexual Health Initiative of the BC Center for Excellence in HIV/AIDS in British Columbia, and lead author of the paper published in the July 22 journal The Lancet.
What led you to do research on HIV and female sex workers?
This is part of a larger series of research on sex workers and HIV that also looked at transmission among male and transgender sex workers.
Why has the criminalization of prostitution made sex workers more vulnerable to HIV infection?
We see across many settings that criminalization leads to more violence. Policing practices displace sex workers, sending them to more hidden places where they’re less safe and where they lose the ability to negotiate conditions, such as condom use.
It seems counterintuitive: A greater police presence in the sex trade leads to more violence and less safety for sex workers. How does that happen?
From our review, we see that policing efforts include bribes, confiscating condoms, police harassment, forced detainment and abuse. And where sex workers experience violence, or fear violence, they’re more likely to have to do things like jump into vehicles quickly [for sex] with a reduced ability to negotiate condom use.
Continue reading.
Photo: Masked Indian sex workers protest alleged police atrocities in Bangalore last year. (Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images)

nprglobalhealth:

Legalizing Prostitution Would Protect Sex Workers From HIV

If prostitution were legal around the world, the transmission of HIV among female sex workers would go down by at least a third, according to a paper presented at the International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia.

That would be a huge step forward. “Sex workers face a disproportionately large burden of HIV,” the paper notes.

Goats and Soda spoke to Dr. Kate Shannon, director of the Gender and Sexual Health Initiative of the BC Center for Excellence in HIV/AIDS in British Columbia, and lead author of the paper published in the July 22 journal The Lancet.

What led you to do research on HIV and female sex workers?

This is part of a larger series of research on sex workers and HIV that also looked at transmission among male and transgender sex workers.

Why has the criminalization of prostitution made sex workers more vulnerable to HIV infection?

We see across many settings that criminalization leads to more violence. Policing practices displace sex workers, sending them to more hidden places where they’re less safe and where they lose the ability to negotiate conditions, such as condom use.

It seems counterintuitive: A greater police presence in the sex trade leads to more violence and less safety for sex workers. How does that happen?

From our review, we see that policing efforts include bribes, confiscating condoms, police harassment, forced detainment and abuse. And where sex workers experience violence, or fear violence, they’re more likely to have to do things like jump into vehicles quickly [for sex] with a reduced ability to negotiate condom use.

Continue reading.

Photo: Masked Indian sex workers protest alleged police atrocities in Bangalore last year. (Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images)

actgnetwork:

It is with great sadness that we acknowledge the death of Joep Lange on Malaysia Airlines flight 017. Joep was an extraordinary clinician, scientist, and humanitarian who fought ceaselessly for the rights of persons living with HIV/AIDS and to assure global access to antiretroviral therapy. Joep was a great friend of the ACTG—he chaired the review of the ACTG during a previous competitive renewal cycle and provided invaluable insights through formal and informal consultation that helped shape the current ACTG agenda. Many of us in the ACTG counted Joep and his partner, Jacqueline, as esteemed colleagues and cherished friends. The impact of their loss is immeasurable. We offer our deepest condolences to their families and colleagues, and we are committed to redouble our efforts to realizing the vision to which Joep had devoted his life.
- Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, ACTG Chair #hiv #aids #research #mh17 http://ift.tt/1teLvpi

actgnetwork:

It is with great sadness that we acknowledge the death of Joep Lange on Malaysia Airlines flight 017. Joep was an extraordinary clinician, scientist, and humanitarian who fought ceaselessly for the rights of persons living with HIV/AIDS and to assure global access to antiretroviral therapy. Joep was a great friend of the ACTG—he chaired the review of the ACTG during a previous competitive renewal cycle and provided invaluable insights through formal and informal consultation that helped shape the current ACTG agenda. Many of us in the ACTG counted Joep and his partner, Jacqueline, as esteemed colleagues and cherished friends. The impact of their loss is immeasurable. We offer our deepest condolences to their families and colleagues, and we are committed to redouble our efforts to realizing the vision to which Joep had devoted his life.
- Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, ACTG Chair #hiv #aids #research #mh17 http://ift.tt/1teLvpi

nychealth:

Friday, June 27 is National HIV Testing Day! 
Man or woman, gay or straight, young or old, everybody needs an HIV test. NYC Health is recognizing National HIV Testing Day by recommending that all New Yorkers Take Control and Take the Test!
FREE HIV testing will be offered this week at the following locations:
Tuesday, June 24

Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm Housing Works: 2640 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn, 12-4pm
Aid for AIDS/Elm Drugs Pharmacy: 56 7th Ave, Manhattan, 2-5pm Ryan Center/Love and Politics: 16 W 36th St, Manhattan, 7-10:30pm Aid for AIDS/General Consulate-Mexico: 27 East 39th St, Manhattan, 9am-12pm 

Wednesday, June 25

Aid for AIDS/Junction Blvd Pharmacy: 95-53 Roosevelt Ave, Queens, 10am-5pm Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm Housing Works: 2640 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn, 12-4pm 
Mt. Sinai Cafeteria 5-17 East 102 St. 3rd Floor, Manhattan, 12-2pm 

Thursday, June 26

Aid for AIDS/General Consulate-Mexico: 27 East 39th St, Manhattan, 9am-12pm Betances Health Center/Salvadoran Consulate: 46 Park Ave, Manhattan, 10am-1pm Aid for AIDS/Betances Health Center: 280 Henry St, Manhattan, 1-5pm Duane Reade/GMHC: 180 W 20th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Duane Reade/Harlem Hospital Center: 51 W. 51st St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Duane Reade/Ryan Center: 52 E 14th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/Harlem United: 2575 Broadway, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/LCOA: 24 W 25th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/Ryan Center: 300 W 135th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/Housing Works: 20 Astor Place, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm Albee Square/Brooklyn Knows: Bond and Fulton St, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm Walgreens/After Hours: 1366 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm Walgreens/Haitian Centers Council: 2101 Church Ave, Brooklyn, 3-7pm Walgreens/Housing Works:755 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm Duane Reade/HEAT: 286 Fulton St, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 

Friday, June 27

Community Healthcare Network: Surf Ave and Stillwell Ave, Brooklyn, 9am-4pm Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm Housing Works: 2640 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn, 12-4pm Kings County Hospital: 451 Clarkson Ave, Brooklyn, 1-4pm Duane Reade/HEAT: 286 Fulton St, Brooklyn, 3-7pm Walgreens/After Hours: 1366 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm Walgreens/Haitian Centers Council: 2101 Church Ave, Brooklyn, 3-7pm Walgreens/Housing Works: 755 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Iris House: 2348 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd, Manhattan, 10am-3pm The Fortune Society: 630 Riverside Drive, Manhattan, 10am-3pm Aid for AIDS/Betances Health Center: 280 Henry St, Manhattan, 1-5pm Duane Reade/GMHC: 180 W 20th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Duane Reade/Harlem Hospital Center: 51 W. 51st St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Duane Reade/Ryan Center: 52 E 14th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/Harlem United: 2575 Broadway, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/LCOA: 24 W 25th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/Ryan Center: 300 W 135th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/Housing Works: 20 Astor Place, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Care for the Homeless: 1911 Jerome Ave, Bronx, 10am-3:30pm Walgreens/ACACIA Network: 406 E Fordham Rd, Bronx, 3-7pm 

Saturday, June 28

Walgreens/ACACIA Network: 666 Courtlandt Ave, Bronx, 10am-2pm Boom Health: 940 Garrison Ave, Bronx, 12-4pm 
Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm Duane Reade/HEAT: 286 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm Walgreens/Haitian Centers Council: 2101 Church Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm Walgreens/Housing Works: 755 Broadway, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm 
Duane Reade/GMHC: 180 W 20th Street, Manhattan, 10am-2pm Duane Reade/Ryan Center: 52 E 14th St, Manhattan, 10am-2pm Walgreens/Harlem United: 2575 Broadway, Manhattan, 10am-2pm Walgreens/LCOA: 24 W 25th St, Manhattan, 10am-2pm Walgreens/Ryan Center: 300 W 135th St, Manhattan, 10am-2pm Walgreens/Housing Works: 20 Astor Place, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 

To help stop HIV in NYC, remember to:Get Tested – In addition to all the free testing locations listed above, you can also call 311, visit 311 online or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 to find local testing sites at any time.Get Treated – If you are living with HIV or know someone who is living with HIV, get medical care. For help finding care or support services in NYC, text ‘CARE’ to 877-877.Get Educated – Learn about the basics of HIV and AIDS. Did you know there are medications available to help prevent HIV? Visit NYC Health’s PrEP and PEP page to get more info.Find out where you can pick up free NYC Condoms.
NYC Health would also like to thank our partners for their support and free testing services: ACACIA Network, After Hours Project, Brooklyn Knows Partners, GMHC, Haitian Centers Council, Harlem Hospital Center, HEAT, Housing Works, Latino Commission on AIDS, Mount Sinai Hospital, and The William F. Ryan Center.

nychealth:

Friday, June 27 is National HIV Testing Day

Man or woman, gay or straight, young or old, everybody needs an HIV test. NYC Health is recognizing National HIV Testing Day by recommending that all New Yorkers Take Control and Take the Test!


FREE HIV testing will be offered this week at the following locations:

Tuesday, June 24

Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm 
Housing Works: 2640 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn, 12-4pm

Aid for AIDS/Elm Drugs Pharmacy: 56 7th Ave, Manhattan, 2-5pm 
Ryan Center/Love and Politics: 16 W 36th St, Manhattan, 7-10:30pm 
Aid for AIDS/General Consulate-Mexico: 27 East 39th St, Manhattan, 9am-12pm 


Wednesday, June 25

Aid for AIDS/Junction Blvd Pharmacy: 95-53 Roosevelt Ave, Queens, 10am-5pm 
Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm 
Housing Works: 2640 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn, 12-4pm 

Mt. Sinai Cafeteria 5-17 East 102 St. 3rd Floor, Manhattan, 12-2pm 


Thursday, June 26

Aid for AIDS/General Consulate-Mexico: 27 East 39th St, Manhattan, 9am-12pm 
Betances Health Center/Salvadoran Consulate: 46 Park Ave, Manhattan, 10am-1pm 
Aid for AIDS/Betances Health Center: 280 Henry St, Manhattan, 1-5pm 
Duane Reade/GMHC: 180 W 20th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Duane Reade/Harlem Hospital Center: 51 W. 51st St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Duane Reade/Ryan Center: 52 E 14th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Harlem United: 2575 Broadway, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/LCOA: 24 W 25th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Ryan Center: 300 W 135th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Housing Works: 20 Astor Place, Manhattan, 3-7pm 

Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm 
Albee Square/Brooklyn Knows: Bond and Fulton St, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/After Hours: 1366 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Haitian Centers Council: 2101 Church Ave, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Housing Works:755 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Duane Reade/HEAT: 286 Fulton St, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 


Friday, June 27

Community Healthcare Network: Surf Ave and Stillwell Ave, Brooklyn, 9am-4pm 
Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm 
Housing Works: 2640 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn, 12-4pm 
Kings County Hospital: 451 Clarkson Ave, Brooklyn, 1-4pm 
Duane Reade/HEAT: 286 Fulton St, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/After Hours: 1366 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Haitian Centers Council: 2101 Church Ave, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Housing Works: 755 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 

Iris House: 2348 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd, Manhattan, 10am-3pm 
The Fortune Society: 630 Riverside Drive, Manhattan, 10am-3pm 
Aid for AIDS/Betances Health Center: 280 Henry St, Manhattan, 1-5pm 
Duane Reade/GMHC: 180 W 20th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Duane Reade/Harlem Hospital Center: 51 W. 51st St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Duane Reade/Ryan Center: 52 E 14th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Harlem United: 2575 Broadway, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/LCOA: 24 W 25th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Ryan Center: 300 W 135th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Housing Works: 20 Astor Place, Manhattan, 3-7pm 

Care for the Homeless: 1911 Jerome Ave, Bronx, 10am-3:30pm 
Walgreens/ACACIA Network: 406 E Fordham Rd, Bronx, 3-7pm 


Saturday, June 28

Walgreens/ACACIA Network: 666 Courtlandt Ave, Bronx, 10am-2pm 
Boom Health: 940 Garrison Ave, Bronx, 12-4pm 

Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm 
Duane Reade/HEAT: 286 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/Haitian Centers Council: 2101 Church Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/Housing Works: 755 Broadway, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm 

Duane Reade/GMHC: 180 W 20th Street, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 
Duane Reade/Ryan Center: 52 E 14th St, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/Harlem United: 2575 Broadway, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/LCOA: 24 W 25th St, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/Ryan Center: 300 W 135th St, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/Housing Works: 20 Astor Place, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 


To help stop HIV in NYC, remember to:
Get Tested – In addition to all the free testing locations listed above, you can also call 311, visit 311 online or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 to find local testing sites at any time.
Get Treated – If you are living with HIV or know someone who is living with HIV, get medical care. For help finding care or support services in NYC, text ‘CARE’ to 877-877.
Get Educated – Learn about the basics of HIV and AIDS. Did you know there are medications available to help prevent HIV? Visit NYC Health’s PrEP and PEP page to get more info.
Find out where you can pick up free NYC Condoms.

NYC Health would also like to thank our partners for their support and free testing services: ACACIA Network, After Hours Project, Brooklyn Knows Partners, GMHC, Haitian Centers Council, Harlem Hospital Center, HEAT, Housing Works, Latino Commission on AIDS, Mount Sinai Hospital, and The William F. Ryan Center.

nychealth:

Happy Pride from NYC Health and NYC Condom!
NYC Condom is excited to announce that we will be participating in Pride events in every borough!
   We’re often asked where you can pick up our alternative Lifestyles condoms - large size, flavored, ribbed, extra sensitive, plus FC2s and lube, too. Stop by the NYC Health booth on the following days to Get Some!
Queens Pride: 
Sunday, June 1 from 12pm-6pm
Brooklyn Pride: 
Saturday, June 14 from 11am-5pm
Harlem Pride: 
Saturday, June 28 from 12pm-6pm
Manhattan Pride: 
Sunday, June 29 from 11am-6pm
Staten Island Pride: 
Saturday, July 12 from12:30-5pm
Bronx Pride: 
Saturday, July 19 from 12pm-6pm
Map and locations:
Sunday, June 1st  Queens: 75th Street between 37th Road and 37th Avenue, Spot 564
Saturday, June 14th  Brooklyn: 5th Avenue and 7th Street, Spot 189

nychealth:

Happy Pride from NYC Health and NYC Condom!

NYC Condom is excited to announce that we will be participating in Pride events in every borough!

   We’re often asked where you can pick up our alternative Lifestyles condoms - large size, flavored, ribbed, extra sensitive, plus FC2s and lube, too. Stop by the NYC Health booth on the following days to Get Some!

Queens Pride:

Sunday, June 1 from 12pm-6pm

Brooklyn Pride:

Saturday, June 14 from 11am-5pm

Harlem Pride:

Saturday, June 28 from 12pm-6pm

Manhattan Pride:

Sunday, June 29 from 11am-6pm

Staten Island Pride:

Saturday, July 12 from12:30-5pm

Bronx Pride:

Saturday, July 19 from 12pm-6pm

Map and locations:

Sunday, June 1st  Queens: 75th Street between 37th Road and 37th Avenue, Spot 564

Saturday, June 14th  Brooklyn: 5th Avenue and 7th Street, Spot 189

nychealth:

Monday, March 10 is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day
National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWAGHAAD) is a nationwide observance that encourages people to take action in the fight against HIV and raises awareness of its impact on women and girls.
 In New York City:
1 out of every 5 new HIV cases is among women and girls
By the end of 2012, black and Latina women accounted for more than 91% of all new HIV cases among women
Women of all races and ethnicities can get HIV, but risks of HIV may be higher in some communities.
The only way to know your HIV status is to Get Tested!



NYC Health community partners are holding numerous NWAGHAAD testing and educational events this week. Check out events in your area, call 311 or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 for your nearest testing location!

 
Saturday, March 8
12-4pm: BOOM! Health will be at The Point, 940 Garrison Ave., Bronx, NY 10474

“Secrets of Our Daughters: The VOICE Within Speaks.” This event will address the problems minority women and girls face in the Bronx community related to HIV.
Free HIV testing will also be provided.


 
Sunday, March 9
10am-3pm: Bridging Access to Care will be at Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church - 760 Dekalb Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11217

Free HIV testing will be provided.

 
Monday, March 10
10am-4:30pm: Harlem United Community AIDS Center, Inc. - 290 Lenox Ave., Lower Level, New York, NY 10027

Free HIV/STI/Hepatitis testing will be provided.

1-5pm: Voces Latinas will be along Roosevelt Avenue between 78th St. and 90th St, Queens, NY 11372

Voces Latinas will provide free information in Spanish focusing on  HIV and women, demonstrations of the female condom, and free HIV testing.


Thursday, March 13
6-8pm: Robert Fulton Terrace Council in collaboration with National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS of NYC, Uptown Health Link and BOOM! Health will be at 530 East 169th St., Bronx, NY 10456

“Teen Talk, That’s What’s Up! A Real Conversation about Sex and your Health.”  Free HIV testing will also be provided.


Sunday, March 15
10am-3pm: Bridging Access to Care will be at Berean Baptist Church 1635 Bergen St., Brooklyn, NY 11213

Free HIV testing will be provided.

 
To help stop HIV in NYC, remember to:
Get Tested – In addition to all the free testing locations listed above, you can also call 311 or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 to find local testing sites at any time throughout the year.
Get treated – If you are living with HIV or know someone who is living with HIV, get medical care. The sooner you begin treatment, the less HIV will damage your body. And if you take your HIV medications as prescribed, you are much less likely to pass HIV to your partners. For help finding care in NYC, text ‘CARE’ to 877-877.
Get Educated – Learn about the basics of HIV and AIDS in your local community.
Get Involved – Host an event, speak out, or volunteer with a local community organization that is working to combat HIV. Visit NYC Health’s HIV/AIDS information pages to learn more about HIV.

Stay Safe—Condoms provide excellent protection against HIV, other sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy. NYC Health distributes free condoms in over 3,500 locations throughout the five boroughs of NYC. Click here for more information about free NYC Condoms.

nychealth:

Monday, March 10 is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWAGHAAD) is a nationwide observance that encourages people to take action in the fight against HIV and raises awareness of its impact on women and girls.

 In New York City:

  • 1 out of every 5 new HIV cases is among women and girls
  • By the end of 2012, black and Latina women accounted for more than 91% of all new HIV cases among women
  • Women of all races and ethnicities can get HIV, but risks of HIV may be higher in some communities.
  • The only way to know your HIV status is to Get Tested!

NYC Health community partners are holding numerous NWAGHAAD testing and educational events this week. Check out events in your area, call 311 or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 for your nearest testing location!

 

Saturday, March 8

12-4pm: BOOM! Health will be at The Point, 940 Garrison Ave., Bronx, NY 10474

“Secrets of Our Daughters: The VOICE Within Speaks.” This event will address the problems minority women and girls face in the Bronx community related to HIV.

Free HIV testing will also be provided.

 

Sunday, March 9

10am-3pm: Bridging Access to Care will be at Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church - 760 Dekalb Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11217

Free HIV testing will be provided.

 

Monday, March 10

10am-4:30pm: Harlem United Community AIDS Center, Inc. - 290 Lenox Ave., Lower Level, New York, NY 10027

Free HIV/STI/Hepatitis testing will be provided.

1-5pm: Voces Latinas will be along Roosevelt Avenue between 78th St. and 90th St, Queens, NY 11372

Voces Latinas will provide free information in Spanish focusing on  HIV and women, demonstrations of the female condom, and free HIV testing.

Thursday, March 13

6-8pm: Robert Fulton Terrace Council in collaboration with National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS of NYC, Uptown Health Link and BOOM! Health will be at 530 East 169th St., Bronx, NY 10456

“Teen Talk, That’s What’s Up! A Real Conversation about Sex and your Health.”  Free HIV testing will also be provided.

Sunday, March 15

10am-3pm: Bridging Access to Care will be at Berean Baptist Church 1635 Bergen St., Brooklyn, NY 11213

Free HIV testing will be provided.

 

To help stop HIV in NYC, remember to:

Get Tested – In addition to all the free testing locations listed above, you can also call 311 or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 to find local testing sites at any time throughout the year.

Get treated – If you are living with HIV or know someone who is living with HIV, get medical care. The sooner you begin treatment, the less HIV will damage your body. And if you take your HIV medications as prescribed, you are much less likely to pass HIV to your partners. For help finding care in NYC, text ‘CARE’ to 877-877.

Get Educated – Learn about the basics of HIV and AIDS in your local community.

Get Involved – Host an event, speak out, or volunteer with a local community organization that is working to combat HIV. Visit NYC Health’s HIV/AIDS information pages to learn more about HIV.

Stay Safe—Condoms provide excellent protection against HIV, other sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy. NYC Health distributes free condoms in over 3,500 locations throughout the five boroughs of NYC. Click here for more information about free NYC Condoms.