Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget. Flash Player 9 is required.
Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget.
Flash Player 9 is required.

nprglobalhealth:

Legalizing Prostitution Would Protect Sex Workers From HIV
If prostitution were legal around the world, the transmission of HIV among female sex workers would go down by at least a third, according to a paper presented at the International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia.
That would be a huge step forward. “Sex workers face a disproportionately large burden of HIV,” the paper notes.
Goats and Soda spoke to Dr. Kate Shannon, director of the Gender and Sexual Health Initiative of the BC Center for Excellence in HIV/AIDS in British Columbia, and lead author of the paper published in the July 22 journal The Lancet.
What led you to do research on HIV and female sex workers?
This is part of a larger series of research on sex workers and HIV that also looked at transmission among male and transgender sex workers.
Why has the criminalization of prostitution made sex workers more vulnerable to HIV infection?
We see across many settings that criminalization leads to more violence. Policing practices displace sex workers, sending them to more hidden places where they’re less safe and where they lose the ability to negotiate conditions, such as condom use.
It seems counterintuitive: A greater police presence in the sex trade leads to more violence and less safety for sex workers. How does that happen?
From our review, we see that policing efforts include bribes, confiscating condoms, police harassment, forced detainment and abuse. And where sex workers experience violence, or fear violence, they’re more likely to have to do things like jump into vehicles quickly [for sex] with a reduced ability to negotiate condom use.
Continue reading.
Photo: Masked Indian sex workers protest alleged police atrocities in Bangalore last year. (Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images)

nprglobalhealth:

Legalizing Prostitution Would Protect Sex Workers From HIV

If prostitution were legal around the world, the transmission of HIV among female sex workers would go down by at least a third, according to a paper presented at the International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia.

That would be a huge step forward. “Sex workers face a disproportionately large burden of HIV,” the paper notes.

Goats and Soda spoke to Dr. Kate Shannon, director of the Gender and Sexual Health Initiative of the BC Center for Excellence in HIV/AIDS in British Columbia, and lead author of the paper published in the July 22 journal The Lancet.

What led you to do research on HIV and female sex workers?

This is part of a larger series of research on sex workers and HIV that also looked at transmission among male and transgender sex workers.

Why has the criminalization of prostitution made sex workers more vulnerable to HIV infection?

We see across many settings that criminalization leads to more violence. Policing practices displace sex workers, sending them to more hidden places where they’re less safe and where they lose the ability to negotiate conditions, such as condom use.

It seems counterintuitive: A greater police presence in the sex trade leads to more violence and less safety for sex workers. How does that happen?

From our review, we see that policing efforts include bribes, confiscating condoms, police harassment, forced detainment and abuse. And where sex workers experience violence, or fear violence, they’re more likely to have to do things like jump into vehicles quickly [for sex] with a reduced ability to negotiate condom use.

Continue reading.

Photo: Masked Indian sex workers protest alleged police atrocities in Bangalore last year. (Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images)

actgnetwork:

It is with great sadness that we acknowledge the death of Joep Lange on Malaysia Airlines flight 017. Joep was an extraordinary clinician, scientist, and humanitarian who fought ceaselessly for the rights of persons living with HIV/AIDS and to assure global access to antiretroviral therapy. Joep was a great friend of the ACTG—he chaired the review of the ACTG during a previous competitive renewal cycle and provided invaluable insights through formal and informal consultation that helped shape the current ACTG agenda. Many of us in the ACTG counted Joep and his partner, Jacqueline, as esteemed colleagues and cherished friends. The impact of their loss is immeasurable. We offer our deepest condolences to their families and colleagues, and we are committed to redouble our efforts to realizing the vision to which Joep had devoted his life.
- Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, ACTG Chair #hiv #aids #research #mh17 http://ift.tt/1teLvpi

actgnetwork:

It is with great sadness that we acknowledge the death of Joep Lange on Malaysia Airlines flight 017. Joep was an extraordinary clinician, scientist, and humanitarian who fought ceaselessly for the rights of persons living with HIV/AIDS and to assure global access to antiretroviral therapy. Joep was a great friend of the ACTG—he chaired the review of the ACTG during a previous competitive renewal cycle and provided invaluable insights through formal and informal consultation that helped shape the current ACTG agenda. Many of us in the ACTG counted Joep and his partner, Jacqueline, as esteemed colleagues and cherished friends. The impact of their loss is immeasurable. We offer our deepest condolences to their families and colleagues, and we are committed to redouble our efforts to realizing the vision to which Joep had devoted his life.
- Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, ACTG Chair #hiv #aids #research #mh17 http://ift.tt/1teLvpi

nychealth:

Friday, June 27 is National HIV Testing Day! 
Man or woman, gay or straight, young or old, everybody needs an HIV test. NYC Health is recognizing National HIV Testing Day by recommending that all New Yorkers Take Control and Take the Test!
FREE HIV testing will be offered this week at the following locations:
Tuesday, June 24

Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm Housing Works: 2640 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn, 12-4pm
Aid for AIDS/Elm Drugs Pharmacy: 56 7th Ave, Manhattan, 2-5pm Ryan Center/Love and Politics: 16 W 36th St, Manhattan, 7-10:30pm Aid for AIDS/General Consulate-Mexico: 27 East 39th St, Manhattan, 9am-12pm 

Wednesday, June 25

Aid for AIDS/Junction Blvd Pharmacy: 95-53 Roosevelt Ave, Queens, 10am-5pm Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm Housing Works: 2640 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn, 12-4pm 
Mt. Sinai Cafeteria 5-17 East 102 St. 3rd Floor, Manhattan, 12-2pm 

Thursday, June 26

Aid for AIDS/General Consulate-Mexico: 27 East 39th St, Manhattan, 9am-12pm Betances Health Center/Salvadoran Consulate: 46 Park Ave, Manhattan, 10am-1pm Aid for AIDS/Betances Health Center: 280 Henry St, Manhattan, 1-5pm Duane Reade/GMHC: 180 W 20th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Duane Reade/Harlem Hospital Center: 51 W. 51st St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Duane Reade/Ryan Center: 52 E 14th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/Harlem United: 2575 Broadway, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/LCOA: 24 W 25th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/Ryan Center: 300 W 135th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/Housing Works: 20 Astor Place, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm Albee Square/Brooklyn Knows: Bond and Fulton St, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm Walgreens/After Hours: 1366 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm Walgreens/Haitian Centers Council: 2101 Church Ave, Brooklyn, 3-7pm Walgreens/Housing Works:755 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm Duane Reade/HEAT: 286 Fulton St, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 

Friday, June 27

Community Healthcare Network: Surf Ave and Stillwell Ave, Brooklyn, 9am-4pm Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm Housing Works: 2640 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn, 12-4pm Kings County Hospital: 451 Clarkson Ave, Brooklyn, 1-4pm Duane Reade/HEAT: 286 Fulton St, Brooklyn, 3-7pm Walgreens/After Hours: 1366 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm Walgreens/Haitian Centers Council: 2101 Church Ave, Brooklyn, 3-7pm Walgreens/Housing Works: 755 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Iris House: 2348 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd, Manhattan, 10am-3pm The Fortune Society: 630 Riverside Drive, Manhattan, 10am-3pm Aid for AIDS/Betances Health Center: 280 Henry St, Manhattan, 1-5pm Duane Reade/GMHC: 180 W 20th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Duane Reade/Harlem Hospital Center: 51 W. 51st St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Duane Reade/Ryan Center: 52 E 14th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/Harlem United: 2575 Broadway, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/LCOA: 24 W 25th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/Ryan Center: 300 W 135th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm Walgreens/Housing Works: 20 Astor Place, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Care for the Homeless: 1911 Jerome Ave, Bronx, 10am-3:30pm Walgreens/ACACIA Network: 406 E Fordham Rd, Bronx, 3-7pm 

Saturday, June 28

Walgreens/ACACIA Network: 666 Courtlandt Ave, Bronx, 10am-2pm Boom Health: 940 Garrison Ave, Bronx, 12-4pm 
Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm Duane Reade/HEAT: 286 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm Walgreens/Haitian Centers Council: 2101 Church Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm Walgreens/Housing Works: 755 Broadway, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm 
Duane Reade/GMHC: 180 W 20th Street, Manhattan, 10am-2pm Duane Reade/Ryan Center: 52 E 14th St, Manhattan, 10am-2pm Walgreens/Harlem United: 2575 Broadway, Manhattan, 10am-2pm Walgreens/LCOA: 24 W 25th St, Manhattan, 10am-2pm Walgreens/Ryan Center: 300 W 135th St, Manhattan, 10am-2pm Walgreens/Housing Works: 20 Astor Place, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 

To help stop HIV in NYC, remember to:Get Tested – In addition to all the free testing locations listed above, you can also call 311, visit 311 online or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 to find local testing sites at any time.Get Treated – If you are living with HIV or know someone who is living with HIV, get medical care. For help finding care or support services in NYC, text ‘CARE’ to 877-877.Get Educated – Learn about the basics of HIV and AIDS. Did you know there are medications available to help prevent HIV? Visit NYC Health’s PrEP and PEP page to get more info.Find out where you can pick up free NYC Condoms.
NYC Health would also like to thank our partners for their support and free testing services: ACACIA Network, After Hours Project, Brooklyn Knows Partners, GMHC, Haitian Centers Council, Harlem Hospital Center, HEAT, Housing Works, Latino Commission on AIDS, Mount Sinai Hospital, and The William F. Ryan Center.

nychealth:

Friday, June 27 is National HIV Testing Day

Man or woman, gay or straight, young or old, everybody needs an HIV test. NYC Health is recognizing National HIV Testing Day by recommending that all New Yorkers Take Control and Take the Test!


FREE HIV testing will be offered this week at the following locations:

Tuesday, June 24

Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm 
Housing Works: 2640 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn, 12-4pm

Aid for AIDS/Elm Drugs Pharmacy: 56 7th Ave, Manhattan, 2-5pm 
Ryan Center/Love and Politics: 16 W 36th St, Manhattan, 7-10:30pm 
Aid for AIDS/General Consulate-Mexico: 27 East 39th St, Manhattan, 9am-12pm 


Wednesday, June 25

Aid for AIDS/Junction Blvd Pharmacy: 95-53 Roosevelt Ave, Queens, 10am-5pm 
Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm 
Housing Works: 2640 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn, 12-4pm 

Mt. Sinai Cafeteria 5-17 East 102 St. 3rd Floor, Manhattan, 12-2pm 


Thursday, June 26

Aid for AIDS/General Consulate-Mexico: 27 East 39th St, Manhattan, 9am-12pm 
Betances Health Center/Salvadoran Consulate: 46 Park Ave, Manhattan, 10am-1pm 
Aid for AIDS/Betances Health Center: 280 Henry St, Manhattan, 1-5pm 
Duane Reade/GMHC: 180 W 20th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Duane Reade/Harlem Hospital Center: 51 W. 51st St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Duane Reade/Ryan Center: 52 E 14th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Harlem United: 2575 Broadway, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/LCOA: 24 W 25th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Ryan Center: 300 W 135th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Housing Works: 20 Astor Place, Manhattan, 3-7pm 

Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm 
Albee Square/Brooklyn Knows: Bond and Fulton St, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/After Hours: 1366 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Haitian Centers Council: 2101 Church Ave, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Housing Works:755 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Duane Reade/HEAT: 286 Fulton St, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 


Friday, June 27

Community Healthcare Network: Surf Ave and Stillwell Ave, Brooklyn, 9am-4pm 
Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm 
Housing Works: 2640 Pitkin Ave, Brooklyn, 12-4pm 
Kings County Hospital: 451 Clarkson Ave, Brooklyn, 1-4pm 
Duane Reade/HEAT: 286 Fulton St, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/After Hours: 1366 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Haitian Centers Council: 2101 Church Ave, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Housing Works: 755 Broadway, Brooklyn, 3-7pm 

Iris House: 2348 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd, Manhattan, 10am-3pm 
The Fortune Society: 630 Riverside Drive, Manhattan, 10am-3pm 
Aid for AIDS/Betances Health Center: 280 Henry St, Manhattan, 1-5pm 
Duane Reade/GMHC: 180 W 20th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Duane Reade/Harlem Hospital Center: 51 W. 51st St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Duane Reade/Ryan Center: 52 E 14th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Harlem United: 2575 Broadway, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/LCOA: 24 W 25th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Ryan Center: 300 W 135th St, Manhattan, 3-7pm 
Walgreens/Housing Works: 20 Astor Place, Manhattan, 3-7pm 

Care for the Homeless: 1911 Jerome Ave, Bronx, 10am-3:30pm 
Walgreens/ACACIA Network: 406 E Fordham Rd, Bronx, 3-7pm 


Saturday, June 28

Walgreens/ACACIA Network: 666 Courtlandt Ave, Bronx, 10am-2pm 
Boom Health: 940 Garrison Ave, Bronx, 12-4pm 

Out of the Closet/AHF: 475 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-6pm 
Duane Reade/HEAT: 286 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/Haitian Centers Council: 2101 Church Ave, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/Housing Works: 755 Broadway, Brooklyn, 10am-2pm 

Duane Reade/GMHC: 180 W 20th Street, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 
Duane Reade/Ryan Center: 52 E 14th St, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/Harlem United: 2575 Broadway, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/LCOA: 24 W 25th St, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/Ryan Center: 300 W 135th St, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 
Walgreens/Housing Works: 20 Astor Place, Manhattan, 10am-2pm 


To help stop HIV in NYC, remember to:
Get Tested – In addition to all the free testing locations listed above, you can also call 311, visit 311 online or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 to find local testing sites at any time.
Get Treated – If you are living with HIV or know someone who is living with HIV, get medical care. For help finding care or support services in NYC, text ‘CARE’ to 877-877.
Get Educated – Learn about the basics of HIV and AIDS. Did you know there are medications available to help prevent HIV? Visit NYC Health’s PrEP and PEP page to get more info.
Find out where you can pick up free NYC Condoms.

NYC Health would also like to thank our partners for their support and free testing services: ACACIA Network, After Hours Project, Brooklyn Knows Partners, GMHC, Haitian Centers Council, Harlem Hospital Center, HEAT, Housing Works, Latino Commission on AIDS, Mount Sinai Hospital, and The William F. Ryan Center.

nychealth:

Happy Pride from NYC Health and NYC Condom!
NYC Condom is excited to announce that we will be participating in Pride events in every borough!
   We’re often asked where you can pick up our alternative Lifestyles condoms - large size, flavored, ribbed, extra sensitive, plus FC2s and lube, too. Stop by the NYC Health booth on the following days to Get Some!
Queens Pride: 
Sunday, June 1 from 12pm-6pm
Brooklyn Pride: 
Saturday, June 14 from 11am-5pm
Harlem Pride: 
Saturday, June 28 from 12pm-6pm
Manhattan Pride: 
Sunday, June 29 from 11am-6pm
Staten Island Pride: 
Saturday, July 12 from12:30-5pm
Bronx Pride: 
Saturday, July 19 from 12pm-6pm
Map and locations:
Sunday, June 1st  Queens: 75th Street between 37th Road and 37th Avenue, Spot 564
Saturday, June 14th  Brooklyn: 5th Avenue and 7th Street, Spot 189

nychealth:

Happy Pride from NYC Health and NYC Condom!

NYC Condom is excited to announce that we will be participating in Pride events in every borough!

   We’re often asked where you can pick up our alternative Lifestyles condoms - large size, flavored, ribbed, extra sensitive, plus FC2s and lube, too. Stop by the NYC Health booth on the following days to Get Some!

Queens Pride:

Sunday, June 1 from 12pm-6pm

Brooklyn Pride:

Saturday, June 14 from 11am-5pm

Harlem Pride:

Saturday, June 28 from 12pm-6pm

Manhattan Pride:

Sunday, June 29 from 11am-6pm

Staten Island Pride:

Saturday, July 12 from12:30-5pm

Bronx Pride:

Saturday, July 19 from 12pm-6pm

Map and locations:

Sunday, June 1st  Queens: 75th Street between 37th Road and 37th Avenue, Spot 564

Saturday, June 14th  Brooklyn: 5th Avenue and 7th Street, Spot 189

nychealth:

Monday, March 10 is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day
National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWAGHAAD) is a nationwide observance that encourages people to take action in the fight against HIV and raises awareness of its impact on women and girls.
 In New York City:
1 out of every 5 new HIV cases is among women and girls
By the end of 2012, black and Latina women accounted for more than 91% of all new HIV cases among women
Women of all races and ethnicities can get HIV, but risks of HIV may be higher in some communities.
The only way to know your HIV status is to Get Tested!



NYC Health community partners are holding numerous NWAGHAAD testing and educational events this week. Check out events in your area, call 311 or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 for your nearest testing location!

 
Saturday, March 8
12-4pm: BOOM! Health will be at The Point, 940 Garrison Ave., Bronx, NY 10474

“Secrets of Our Daughters: The VOICE Within Speaks.” This event will address the problems minority women and girls face in the Bronx community related to HIV.
Free HIV testing will also be provided.


 
Sunday, March 9
10am-3pm: Bridging Access to Care will be at Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church - 760 Dekalb Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11217

Free HIV testing will be provided.

 
Monday, March 10
10am-4:30pm: Harlem United Community AIDS Center, Inc. - 290 Lenox Ave., Lower Level, New York, NY 10027

Free HIV/STI/Hepatitis testing will be provided.

1-5pm: Voces Latinas will be along Roosevelt Avenue between 78th St. and 90th St, Queens, NY 11372

Voces Latinas will provide free information in Spanish focusing on  HIV and women, demonstrations of the female condom, and free HIV testing.


Thursday, March 13
6-8pm: Robert Fulton Terrace Council in collaboration with National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS of NYC, Uptown Health Link and BOOM! Health will be at 530 East 169th St., Bronx, NY 10456

“Teen Talk, That’s What’s Up! A Real Conversation about Sex and your Health.”  Free HIV testing will also be provided.


Sunday, March 15
10am-3pm: Bridging Access to Care will be at Berean Baptist Church 1635 Bergen St., Brooklyn, NY 11213

Free HIV testing will be provided.

 
To help stop HIV in NYC, remember to:
Get Tested – In addition to all the free testing locations listed above, you can also call 311 or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 to find local testing sites at any time throughout the year.
Get treated – If you are living with HIV or know someone who is living with HIV, get medical care. The sooner you begin treatment, the less HIV will damage your body. And if you take your HIV medications as prescribed, you are much less likely to pass HIV to your partners. For help finding care in NYC, text ‘CARE’ to 877-877.
Get Educated – Learn about the basics of HIV and AIDS in your local community.
Get Involved – Host an event, speak out, or volunteer with a local community organization that is working to combat HIV. Visit NYC Health’s HIV/AIDS information pages to learn more about HIV.

Stay Safe—Condoms provide excellent protection against HIV, other sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy. NYC Health distributes free condoms in over 3,500 locations throughout the five boroughs of NYC. Click here for more information about free NYC Condoms.

nychealth:

Monday, March 10 is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWAGHAAD) is a nationwide observance that encourages people to take action in the fight against HIV and raises awareness of its impact on women and girls.

 In New York City:

  • 1 out of every 5 new HIV cases is among women and girls
  • By the end of 2012, black and Latina women accounted for more than 91% of all new HIV cases among women
  • Women of all races and ethnicities can get HIV, but risks of HIV may be higher in some communities.
  • The only way to know your HIV status is to Get Tested!

NYC Health community partners are holding numerous NWAGHAAD testing and educational events this week. Check out events in your area, call 311 or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 for your nearest testing location!

 

Saturday, March 8

12-4pm: BOOM! Health will be at The Point, 940 Garrison Ave., Bronx, NY 10474

“Secrets of Our Daughters: The VOICE Within Speaks.” This event will address the problems minority women and girls face in the Bronx community related to HIV.

Free HIV testing will also be provided.

 

Sunday, March 9

10am-3pm: Bridging Access to Care will be at Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church - 760 Dekalb Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11217

Free HIV testing will be provided.

 

Monday, March 10

10am-4:30pm: Harlem United Community AIDS Center, Inc. - 290 Lenox Ave., Lower Level, New York, NY 10027

Free HIV/STI/Hepatitis testing will be provided.

1-5pm: Voces Latinas will be along Roosevelt Avenue between 78th St. and 90th St, Queens, NY 11372

Voces Latinas will provide free information in Spanish focusing on  HIV and women, demonstrations of the female condom, and free HIV testing.

Thursday, March 13

6-8pm: Robert Fulton Terrace Council in collaboration with National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS of NYC, Uptown Health Link and BOOM! Health will be at 530 East 169th St., Bronx, NY 10456

“Teen Talk, That’s What’s Up! A Real Conversation about Sex and your Health.”  Free HIV testing will also be provided.

Sunday, March 15

10am-3pm: Bridging Access to Care will be at Berean Baptist Church 1635 Bergen St., Brooklyn, NY 11213

Free HIV testing will be provided.

 

To help stop HIV in NYC, remember to:

Get Tested – In addition to all the free testing locations listed above, you can also call 311 or text ‘testNYC’ to 877-877 to find local testing sites at any time throughout the year.

Get treated – If you are living with HIV or know someone who is living with HIV, get medical care. The sooner you begin treatment, the less HIV will damage your body. And if you take your HIV medications as prescribed, you are much less likely to pass HIV to your partners. For help finding care in NYC, text ‘CARE’ to 877-877.

Get Educated – Learn about the basics of HIV and AIDS in your local community.

Get Involved – Host an event, speak out, or volunteer with a local community organization that is working to combat HIV. Visit NYC Health’s HIV/AIDS information pages to learn more about HIV.

Stay Safe—Condoms provide excellent protection against HIV, other sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy. NYC Health distributes free condoms in over 3,500 locations throughout the five boroughs of NYC. Click here for more information about free NYC Condoms.

actgnetwork:

Our Dr. Paul Sax asks and answers the question “should people living with HIV be vaccinated against meningococcus?” Meningococcal disease means the lining of the brain and spinal cord have become infected with bacteria. A recent study found people living with HIV are 8 to 12 times more likely to develop meningococcal disease than people who do not have the virus. During an outbreak of meningococcal disease, like that one that recently occurred in NYC, Sax recommends vaccinating people living with HIV. 

actgnetwork:

Our Dr. Paul Sax asks and answers the question “should people living with HIV be vaccinated against meningococcus?” Meningococcal disease means the lining of the brain and spinal cord have become infected with bacteria. A recent study found people living with HIV are 8 to 12 times more likely to develop meningococcal disease than people who do not have the virus. During an outbreak of meningococcal disease, like that one that recently occurred in NYC, Sax recommends vaccinating people living with HIV. 


The case for taking one pill a day to prevent HIV 
Opinion: Concerns about the newly approved drug Truvada for HIV prevention are unfounded. It’s worth prescribing, say health researchers at UCLA.


by Abraar Karan and Jeffrey D. Klausner
New global data overwhelmingly suggest that a pill to prevent HIV, approved by the United States’ Food and Drug Administration in July 2012, is safer and more effective than the medical community originally thought. Importantly, new models predict that when taken daily, the drug, called Truvada, can lower the risk of HIV transmission by 99 percent. Recent studies also show that a large-scale rollout of Truvada is unlikely to lead to increased antiviral drug resistance or risk-taking behavior, as some had feared.
But old concerns, even as they have been called into question, persist, and are hindering Truvada from being widely used for HIV prevention. This needs to change. 
The use of Truvada — a drug originally approved for HIV treatment — for HIV prevention in uninfected people is an unprecedented approach to addressing the epidemic. In the medical community, this form of therapy is known as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and so far Truvada is the only drug to obtain PrEP approval. While the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends PrEP for those at high risk for contracting HIV, such as men who have sex with men, sex workers, injection drug users, and people with known HIV-infected partners, its adoption has been slow over the last two years largely due to concerns about its safety, efficacy, and effect on patient’s sexual behavior.
When Truvada first was approved for PrEP, some public health experts and community groups feared that people might feel falsely protected against HIV and participate in high-risk sexual behavior, potentially negating the protective potential of the regimen. These critics also worried that mass prescription of PrEP could perpetuate antiviral drug resistance because of low adherence by patients in some studies. 
Complicating matters, physicians were hesitant to prescribe Truvada for PrEP because they felt its small risk of side effects and financial costs could be avoided if patients consistently used protective measures such as condoms and were careful in their choice and number of sexual partners. What’s more, the main study supporting the use of PrEP, known as the iPrEx Study, reported that PrEP worked only about half the time, confusing the health community, because it appeared PrEP was not as effective as expected.
Two years later, more recent studies tell a different story, but fears are still contributing to PrEP’s low support by physicians and low demand by at-risk patients. Ultimately, healthcare providers play a major role in patient decision-making and physicians need to stand behind PrEP so that patients will increase uptake and adherence.
We have a few key recommendations to be adopted globally in order to increase the use of PrEP. First, PrEP must be adequately integrated into primary care systems directed at high-risk populations. In the US, this may be facilitated through the Affordable Care Act. Globally, we need to advocate for PrEP’s inclusion in existing HIV treatment and prevention models and urge for increased funding to support provision of PrEP in low-income countries. While Truvada is available around the world, its use as PrEP has not yet been approved or implemented everywhere. Moreover, it is largely unaffordable at up to $14,000 per year. Its manufacturer, Gilead Sciences, should allow tiered and reduced pricing for low-income regions.
Second, adherence to medication must be improved—it is the only evidenced shortfall of PrEP for which we do not yet have a tested solution. We need to educate and support primary care providers and at-risk communities, as well as establish strong and clear global guidelines for PrEP usage. Strong primary care systems that integrate innovative health coaching and community health worker strategies will be critical to this effort.
Lastly, we need to document and systematize PrEP usage far more efficiently. Currently, there is no registry of PrEP users in the world. We need to collect data on who is taking PrEP to monitor prescribing, adherence, risk behavior, antiviral resistance patterns, and effectiveness at the population level. In the US and countries with strong information technology infrastructure, this can be done more quickly than in other, less developed regions.
A couple of years ago, the debates surrounding the use of Truvada for PrEP in healthy people were reasonable. But with new evidence, we believe in 2014 there is less to debate and far more to accomplish to make PrEP available. No longer can we reasonably ignore what may very well lead to the end of global HIV/AIDS.
Abraar Karan is a medical student at UCLA. He has worked in Uganda at the Infectious Disease Institute and in Mozambique with the Center for Disease Control studying HIV clinical practice and policy. He runs the global health blog Swasthya Mundial and you can follow him @SwasthyaMundial. Dr. Jeffrey D. Klausner is an infectious disease specialist and professor of medicine and public health at UCLA. He is the Former Director of STD Prevention and Control Services in San Francisco and Former Chief of the HIV and TB Branch at the Center for Disease Control, South Africa. 
(From Global Post)

The case for taking one pill a day to prevent HIV

Opinion: Concerns about the newly approved drug Truvada for HIV prevention are unfounded. It’s worth prescribing, say health researchers at UCLA.

New global data overwhelmingly suggest that a pill to prevent HIV, approved by the United States’ Food and Drug Administration in July 2012, is safer and more effective than the medical community originally thought. Importantly, new models predict that when taken daily, the drug, called Truvada, can lower the risk of HIV transmission by 99 percent. Recent studies also show that a large-scale rollout of Truvada is unlikely to lead to increased antiviral drug resistance or risk-taking behavior, as some had feared.

But old concerns, even as they have been called into question, persist, and are hindering Truvada from being widely used for HIV prevention. This needs to change. 

The use of Truvada — a drug originally approved for HIV treatment — for HIV prevention in uninfected people is an unprecedented approach to addressing the epidemic. In the medical community, this form of therapy is known as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and so far Truvada is the only drug to obtain PrEP approval. While the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends PrEP for those at high risk for contracting HIV, such as men who have sex with men, sex workers, injection drug users, and people with known HIV-infected partners, its adoption has been slow over the last two years largely due to concerns about its safety, efficacy, and effect on patient’s sexual behavior.

When Truvada first was approved for PrEP, some public health experts and community groups feared that people might feel falsely protected against HIV and participate in high-risk sexual behavior, potentially negating the protective potential of the regimen. These critics also worried that mass prescription of PrEP could perpetuate antiviral drug resistance because of low adherence by patients in some studies. 

Complicating matters, physicians were hesitant to prescribe Truvada for PrEP because they felt its small risk of side effects and financial costs could be avoided if patients consistently used protective measures such as condoms and were careful in their choice and number of sexual partners. What’s more, the main study supporting the use of PrEP, known as the iPrEx Study, reported that PrEP worked only about half the time, confusing the health community, because it appeared PrEP was not as effective as expected.

Two years later, more recent studies tell a different story, but fears are still contributing to PrEP’s low support by physicians and low demand by at-risk patients. Ultimately, healthcare providers play a major role in patient decision-making and physicians need to stand behind PrEP so that patients will increase uptake and adherence.

We have a few key recommendations to be adopted globally in order to increase the use of PrEP. First, PrEP must be adequately integrated into primary care systems directed at high-risk populations. In the US, this may be facilitated through the Affordable Care Act. Globally, we need to advocate for PrEP’s inclusion in existing HIV treatment and prevention models and urge for increased funding to support provision of PrEP in low-income countries. While Truvada is available around the world, its use as PrEP has not yet been approved or implemented everywhere. Moreover, it is largely unaffordable at up to $14,000 per year. Its manufacturer, Gilead Sciences, should allow tiered and reduced pricing for low-income regions.

Second, adherence to medication must be improved—it is the only evidenced shortfall of PrEP for which we do not yet have a tested solution. We need to educate and support primary care providers and at-risk communities, as well as establish strong and clear global guidelines for PrEP usage. Strong primary care systems that integrate innovative health coaching and community health worker strategies will be critical to this effort.

Lastly, we need to document and systematize PrEP usage far more efficiently. Currently, there is no registry of PrEP users in the world. We need to collect data on who is taking PrEP to monitor prescribing, adherence, risk behavior, antiviral resistance patterns, and effectiveness at the population level. In the US and countries with strong information technology infrastructure, this can be done more quickly than in other, less developed regions.

A couple of years ago, the debates surrounding the use of Truvada for PrEP in healthy people were reasonable. But with new evidence, we believe in 2014 there is less to debate and far more to accomplish to make PrEP available. No longer can we reasonably ignore what may very well lead to the end of global HIV/AIDS.

Abraar Karan is a medical student at UCLA. He has worked in Uganda at the Infectious Disease Institute and in Mozambique with the Center for Disease Control studying HIV clinical practice and policy. He runs the global health blog Swasthya Mundial and you can follow him @SwasthyaMundial. Dr. Jeffrey D. Klausner is an infectious disease specialist and professor of medicine and public health at UCLA. He is the Former Director of STD Prevention and Control Services in San Francisco and Former Chief of the HIV and TB Branch at the Center for Disease Control, South Africa.

(From Global Post)

nprglobalhealth:

How The U.S. Helped Fight The Global AIDS Epidemic

A decade ago, President George W. Bush announced an unprecedented global health initiative: $15 billion over five years to fight HIV in developing countries.

"There are whole countries in Africa where more than one-third of the adult population carries the infection," Bush said in his 2003 State of the Union address. "Yet across that continent, only 50,000 AIDS victims — only 50,000 — are receiving the medicine they need."

Congress quickly passed the bill. By the end of May 2003, thePresident’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or PEPFAR, was law.

Over the past decade, the U.S. has spent more than $50 billion on PEPFAR, largely to test and treat people for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.

Some health officials have questioned whether PEPFAR has drained money from addressing other problems. But in general, the initiative has been considered a success.

Nearly 10 million people around the world now have access to antiviral drugs, and treatment for two-thirds of these people is directly supported by PEPFAR, the U.S. government reported earlier this month. Treatment for HIV-positive mothers funded by PEPFAR prevented 740,000 infants from getting infected with the virus at birth.

Continue reading.

Charts by Matt Stiles/NPR. Data from UNAIDS and PEPFAR.

Why it’s time to retire the phrase ‘AIDS in Africa’
This infographic for our new AIDS report shows why it’s time to stop saying the phrase “AIDS in Africa.” African countries have made widely divergent progress toward the beginning of the end of AIDS, and a one-size-fits-all approach to tackling AIDS on the continent does not make sense.
(From One.org)

Why it’s time to retire the phrase ‘AIDS in Africa’

This infographic for our new AIDS report shows why it’s time to stop saying the phrase “AIDS in Africa.” African countries have made widely divergent progress toward the beginning of the end of AIDS, and a one-size-fits-all approach to tackling AIDS on the continent does not make sense.

(From One.org)

One of the World’s Tiniest, Poorest Countries Is Redefining HIV Care
In Rwanda, success is measured not by how many people live and die, but by how many take their medication and lead normal lives.

By Neil Gupta
In the past decade, sub-Saharan Africa, the world’s poorest region, has made enormous strides in the fight against HIV. There are now more than 7.5 million people receiving antiretroviral therapy, 150 times as many as a decade ago. Medications have become more effective and easier to take, and they are now combined so that many patients take as little as one pill a day. HIV testing has become more widely available, and we are detecting the virus at earlier stages before too much damage is done.
With World AIDS Day upon us, however, it is important to keep in mind that the needs in this part of the world are still grim. The U.N. estimates that only 45 percent of pregnant women are tested for HIV and only 35 percent of infants born to mothers with HIV are tested for the virus on time. Treatment for children and adolescents lags dramatically behind that of adults. Around the world, 1.7 million people die of the disease every year. Unfortunately, the UNAIDS goal of 15 million people on treatment by 2015 seems a long way off, and HIV vaccines and “cures” remain in early investigatory phases.
Yet in Rwanda, where just 20 years ago a genocide claimed approximately 1 million lives, the government has transformed HIV care for the poor by redefining the standards for successful treatment. More than three decades into the epidemic, many national and international agencies are still counting the basics—how many people get infected, how many people receive medication, how many patients die. Success in Rwanda, meanwhile, is measured not in the number remaining alive, but rather in how many are actually able to take their medications as directed and suppress the virus in their bodies to a level where it is essentially non-existent. In Rwanda, success is achieved when people living with HIV can earn a living, support their family, raise their children, and care for their community no differently than their peers. 
As a physician working for Partners in Health in Rwanda, I have witnessed the impact of this relentless approach to HIV care and treatment, and the stabilizing and uplifting impact it has had on the lives of Rwandans. Patients who would have previously been hospitalized with severe and end-stage complications of HIV are now coming for regular, preventive care. Families and communities previously devastated by the dual impact of insecurity and HIV are now thriving hubs for HIV prevention and treatment. I’ve come to realize that this tiny East African country may have large lessons to share with the global HIV movement.
More…
(From The Atlantic)

One of the World’s Tiniest, Poorest Countries Is Redefining HIV Care

In Rwanda, success is measured not by how many people live and die, but by how many take their medication and lead normal lives.

By Neil Gupta

In the past decade, sub-Saharan Africa, the world’s poorest region, has made enormous strides in the fight against HIV. There are now more than 7.5 million people receiving antiretroviral therapy, 150 times as many as a decade ago. Medications have become more effective and easier to take, and they are now combined so that many patients take as little as one pill a day. HIV testing has become more widely available, and we are detecting the virus at earlier stages before too much damage is done.

With World AIDS Day upon us, however, it is important to keep in mind that the needs in this part of the world are still grim. The U.N. estimates that only 45 percent of pregnant women are tested for HIV and only 35 percent of infants born to mothers with HIV are tested for the virus on time. Treatment for children and adolescents lags dramatically behind that of adults. Around the world, 1.7 million people die of the disease every year. Unfortunately, the UNAIDS goal of 15 million people on treatment by 2015 seems a long way off, and HIV vaccines and “cures” remain in early investigatory phases.

Yet in Rwanda, where just 20 years ago a genocide claimed approximately 1 million lives, the government has transformed HIV care for the poor by redefining the standards for successful treatment. More than three decades into the epidemic, many national and international agencies are still counting the basics—how many people get infected, how many people receive medication, how many patients die. Success in Rwanda, meanwhile, is measured not in the number remaining alive, but rather in how many are actually able to take their medications as directed and suppress the virus in their bodies to a level where it is essentially non-existent. In Rwanda, success is achieved when people living with HIV can earn a living, support their family, raise their children, and care for their community no differently than their peers. 

As a physician working for Partners in Health in Rwanda, I have witnessed the impact of this relentless approach to HIV care and treatment, and the stabilizing and uplifting impact it has had on the lives of Rwandans. Patients who would have previously been hospitalized with severe and end-stage complications of HIV are now coming for regular, preventive care. Families and communities previously devastated by the dual impact of insecurity and HIV are now thriving hubs for HIV prevention and treatment. I’ve come to realize that this tiny East African country may have large lessons to share with the global HIV movement.

More…

(From The Atlantic)