Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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Residents in Vars and Hunt Club East will experience a new kind of “drive thru” this weekend as the MarketMobile aims to improve access to healthy foods in the City’s east-end. The MarketMobile is an innovative new project using a chartered bus to bring fresh and affordable vegetables and…

Neighbourhoods with more fast-food restaurants linked to higher BMIs among residents: Ontario study
ORONTO — Neighbourhoods with a high number of fast food restaurants are no place for the weight conscious, a new study suggests.
The research reveals that the average body mass index of Canadians living in areas with a high density of fast food outlets is higher than the average BMI of people who live in neighbourhoods with more full-service restaurants.
The work was conducted by scientists at the University of Western Ontario, in London, and published in the Canadian Journal of Public Health.
Some earlier studies done in the United States have revealed similar findings, as have a couple of small studies looking only at children in two different centres in Canada. The authors say this paper is the first to show the possible link in the Canadian adults based on individual-level data.
And they say the finding could be used to justify government action, whether that’s zoning bylaws aimed at restricting the density of fast food outlets or requiring fast food restaurants to post calorie counts for the food items they serve.
(More on National Post, Toronto, Canada)

Neighbourhoods with more fast-food restaurants linked to higher BMIs among residents: Ontario study

ORONTO — Neighbourhoods with a high number of fast food restaurants are no place for the weight conscious, a new study suggests.

The research reveals that the average body mass index of Canadians living in areas with a high density of fast food outlets is higher than the average BMI of people who live in neighbourhoods with more full-service restaurants.

The work was conducted by scientists at the University of Western Ontario, in London, and published in the Canadian Journal of Public Health.

Some earlier studies done in the United States have revealed similar findings, as have a couple of small studies looking only at children in two different centres in Canada. The authors say this paper is the first to show the possible link in the Canadian adults based on individual-level data.

And they say the finding could be used to justify government action, whether that’s zoning bylaws aimed at restricting the density of fast food outlets or requiring fast food restaurants to post calorie counts for the food items they serve.

(More on National Post, Toronto, Canada)

ottawahealth:

With summer in full swing, it’s time for concerts, get-togethers and parties. Partying often involves drinking and other risks, including unprotected sex. Here are some ideas to help you keep yourself safe in the coming months while you enjoy everything that summer has to offer.

When you go…

Time To Screen Tool
Use this tool to find out when you should screen for breast cancer, cervical cancer and colorectal cancer.
(From Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care)
http://health.gov.on.ca/en/public/programs/cancer/screening/

Time To Screen Tool

Use this tool to find out when you should screen for breast cancer, cervical cancer and colorectal cancer.

(From Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care)

http://health.gov.on.ca/en/public/programs/cancer/screening/

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On the occasion of World No-Tobacco Day, Stéphane Giguère, CEO of Ottawa Community Housing (OCH) was on hand to affix new signage to mark the start of the OCH’s no-smoking policy. There are 102 Community Housing providers in Ontario that have a no-smoking policy including Niagara Regional…

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For many people, the term “daycare food” conjures up images of hotdogs, canned soup and bologna sandwiches. In recent years, a growing number of concerned operators and chefs have taken a fresh look at what’s on their daycare menus. The result? More and more centres are experimenting with…

Oh My! Sugar Shocker

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One in every five calories Canadians consume comes from sugar. Most people know that soft drinks, syrup and candy are high in sugar, but there are many other foods that contain lots of sugar, foods you may think contain minimal amounts.  Some examples include: salad dressing, granola bars, ketchup and ready-to-eat meals all contain added sugar.

Check your foods for added sugars. If you see any of these words on the ingredient list, you can be sure that food has added sugar:

  • Sucrose, sugar, liquid sugar, invert sugar
  • Words that end in “ose” such as glucose, fructose and dextrose
  • Corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, dextrin
  • Honey, molasses, maple syrup
  • Concentrated fruit juice

How much sugar is too much sugar?                                                       

The World Health Organisation (WHO) is currently discussing lowering the limit of sugar to 5% of our daily caloric intake. This is equivalent to 6 teaspoons or 25 grams of sugar a day. One 355ml can of pop has approximately 10 teaspoons (30 grams) of sugar – more than a day’s worth!

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ParticipACTION’s #SneakItIn Week returns from April 7 to 11, 2014. Join this movement by wearing your sneakers at work and finding ways to sneak in a few extra steps into your day!

Sneak It in Week aims to get Canadians more physically active during the workday. For many Canadians,…

Protect yourself from mosquito bites

ottawahealth:

Reduce your chance of infection from vector borne illness by doing the following:

  • Apply an approved mosquito repellent to exposed skin and clothing.
  • Wear long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, shoes and socks to protect exposed skin.
  • Wear light coloured, tightly woven clothing - mosquitoes are attracted to darker colours and can still bite through thin clothing.
  • Avoid wearing scented perfumes, deodorants and personal products.
  • Avoid the hours between dusk and dawn - periods when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Make sure all windows and doors in your home have screens that are in good condition.
  • Protecting yourself when travelling to locations where serious mosquito borne diseases may be common.

Eliminate standing water sites around your home

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Dr. Rosamund Lewis, Associate Medical Officer of Health in Ottawa, answers some frequently asked questions about the measles vaccine.