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ParticipACTION’s #SneakItIn Week returns from April 7 to 11, 2014. Join this movement by wearing your sneakers at work and finding ways to sneak in a few extra steps into your day!

Sneak It in Week aims to get Canadians more physically active during the workday. For many Canadians,…

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Protect yourself from mosquito bites

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Reduce your chance of infection from vector borne illness by doing the following:

  • Apply an approved mosquito repellent to exposed skin and clothing.
  • Wear long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, shoes and socks to protect exposed skin.
  • Wear light coloured, tightly woven clothing - mosquitoes are attracted to darker colours and can still bite through thin clothing.
  • Avoid wearing scented perfumes, deodorants and personal products.
  • Avoid the hours between dusk and dawn - periods when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Make sure all windows and doors in your home have screens that are in good condition.
  • Protecting yourself when travelling to locations where serious mosquito borne diseases may be common.

Eliminate standing water sites around your home

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Eat together as a family

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Sometimes getting the family around the table at dinner time can be difficult. Working late, driving from the daycare to the soccer field to band practice - sound familiar? However, there are some benefits worthy of finding time to sit down and eat as a family.

Studies (See below) have shown that eating as a family has a positive influence on eating habits for children and adolescents. Meals eaten as a family are usually more balanced and less likely to include fried foods, sweets, salty snacks and pop.

For busy families, even if you have little time for food preparation, here are a few fun ways to eat together:

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Radon Gas - Test your home in winter for best results

Did you know that radon, an invisible and odourless gas, is everywhere?  Outdoors, radon gas is diluted and doesn’t pose a health risk. But if high levels of radon gas accumulate inside your home, action should be taken to lower the levels and the associated health risks. 

Radon gas comes from aging uranium deposits in the ground and can enter your home through crack or opening such as sump pump pits. The good news is that it is easy to test and there exists remediation methods to lower indoor levels. Test your home for radon gas!  For more information or to purchase a radon test kit, contact Ottawa Public Health at 613-580-6744 or email healthsante@ottawa.ca

Roberta Bondar is a spokesperson for the Take Action on Radon initiative encouraging people to test their homes for radon gas. For more videos or information visit TakeActiononRadon.ca

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Link between vaccination and autism? Fact or Fiction?

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Fact - Vaccination, specifically the ingredient thimerosal, does not cause autism. Countless medical studies have concluded that there is no connection between thimerosal and autism.

The amount of thimerosal used in the influenza vaccine is very small and has not been shown to cause harm.  In Canada, the only vaccine containing thimerosal that young children currently receive is for influenza. For more information about vaccine safety, visit the Public Health Agency of Canada website.

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Are you worried about falling? Would you like to improve your balance? Join the free Stand Up Falls Prevention Program in Ottawa.

  • Make your legs stronger and keep your bones healthy
  • Know more about how to prevent falls

Stand Up is a free group exercise program for adults 65+…

Welcome to the Safer Ottawa Drinking Alliance (SODA) Website!

Our goal is to encourage students to look at their alcohol intake and make smart choices to enjoy life to the fullest. Whether you’re an occasional or regular drinker, or you don’t drink at all, take a few minutes to:

Complete the “Check Your Drinking” quiz and see how you compare to other people your age
Get familiar with standard drink sizes and the Canada’s Low Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines
Check out the services and resources on your campus and in your community
 

(From Safer Ottawa Drinking Alliance)
Welcome to the Safer Ottawa Drinking Alliance (SODA) Website!

Our goal is to encourage students to look at their alcohol intake and make smart choices to enjoy life to the fullest. Whether you’re an occasional or regular drinker, or you don’t drink at all, take a few minutes to:

Check Your Drinking!Canada's Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines

(From Safer Ottawa Drinking Alliance)