Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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nychealth:

NYC Health is currently investigating three new meningitis cases in NYC among men who have sex with men.

What is meningitis (also known as invasive meningococcal disease)?
Meningitis is a severe bacterial infection that has a high fatality rate. A previous outbreak of meningitis among men who have sex with men in NYC ended in February 2013 after 22 cases were reported, including 7 fatal cases. Twelve of the 22 cases were HIV-infected.

How is meningitis spread?

This disease is spread by prolonged close contact with nose or throat discharges from an infected person. Examples of prolonged contact include living in the same household, sharing cigarettes, or intimate activities, including kissing and sexual contact.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms include fever, chill, severe muscle or abdominal pain, headache, vomiting, stiff neck and a rash, and usually occur within five days of exposure. If you think you may have been exposed and develop any of these symptoms, seek medical care immediately.
 How can I protect myself?
The Health Department recommends meningococcal vaccination for all men who have sex with men, regardless of HIV status, who regularly have intimate contact with other men met through a website, hookup/dating apps, or at a bar or party.
Where to get vaccinated?
Ask your provider about the meningococcal vaccine. The vaccine is also available at many pharmacies, including all NYC Duane Reade and Walgreens locations. These locations accept most insurance, including Medicaid.

No insurance? Vaccinations are also available at Health Dept. clinics. Clinics locations below:

DOHMH Clinic - Manhattanville Renaissance 21 Old Broadway (at 126th St.) 10027. Hours are Mon-Fri 8:30A-3:30P.

DOHMH Clinic - Central Harlem 2238 5th Ave (at 137th St.) 10037. Hours are Tue-Sat 8:30A-3:30P.

DOHMH Clinic - Morrisania 1309 Fulton Ave (at E 169th St.) 10456. Hours are Mon-Fri 8:30A-3P.

DOHMH Clinic - Fort Greene 295 Flatbush Ave, 2nd Fl. 11201. Hours are Tue-Sat 8:30A-3P.

DOHMH Clinic - Crown Heights 1218 1218 Prospect Pl 11213. Hours are Mon-Fri 8:30A-3:30P.

DOHMH Clinic - Corona 34-33 Junction Blvd 11372. Hours are Tue & Fri 8:30A-3P.

DOHMH Clinic - Jamaica 90-37 Parsons Blvd 11432. Hours are Tue-Sat 8:30A-3P.


You can also text VAXALERT to 877877 to search for vaccine locations near you.


Learn more about meningitis in our FAQ. 

nychealth:

NYC Health is currently investigating three new meningitis cases in NYC among men who have sex with men.

What is meningitis (also known as invasive meningococcal disease)?

Meningitis is a severe bacterial infection that has a high fatality rate. A previous outbreak of meningitis among men who have sex with men in NYC ended in February 2013 after 22 cases were reported, including 7 fatal cases. Twelve of the 22 cases were HIV-infected.

How is meningitis spread?

This disease is spread by prolonged close contact with nose or throat discharges from an infected person. Examples of prolonged contact include living in the same household, sharing cigarettes, or intimate activities, including kissing and sexual contact.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms include fever, chill, severe muscle or abdominal pain, headache, vomiting, stiff neck and a rash, and usually occur within five days of exposure. If you think you may have been exposed and develop any of these symptoms, seek medical care immediately.

 How can I protect myself?

The Health Department recommends meningococcal vaccination for all men who have sex with men, regardless of HIV status, who regularly have intimate contact with other men met through a website, hookup/dating apps, or at a bar or party.


Where to get vaccinated?

Ask your provider about the meningococcal vaccine. The vaccine is also available at many pharmacies, including all NYC Duane Reade and Walgreens locations. These locations accept most insurance, including Medicaid.

No insurance? Vaccinations are also available at Health Dept. clinics. Clinics locations below:

DOHMH Clinic - Manhattanville Renaissance 21 Old Broadway (at 126th St.) 10027. Hours are Mon-Fri 8:30A-3:30P.

DOHMH Clinic - Central Harlem 2238 5th Ave (at 137th St.) 10037. Hours are Tue-Sat 8:30A-3:30P.

DOHMH Clinic - Morrisania 1309 Fulton Ave (at E 169th St.) 10456. Hours are Mon-Fri 8:30A-3P.

DOHMH Clinic - Fort Greene 295 Flatbush Ave, 2nd Fl. 11201. Hours are Tue-Sat 8:30A-3P.

DOHMH Clinic - Crown Heights 1218 1218 Prospect Pl 11213. Hours are Mon-Fri 8:30A-3:30P.

DOHMH Clinic - Corona 34-33 Junction Blvd 11372. Hours are Tue & Fri 8:30A-3P.

DOHMH Clinic - Jamaica 90-37 Parsons Blvd 11432. Hours are Tue-Sat 8:30A-3P.

You can also text VAXALERT to 877877 to search for vaccine locations near you.

Learn more about meningitis in our FAQ

HPV Vaccine Is Cancer Prevention

(From CDC)

pocstudios:

Check Your Risk is campaign to try and get youth who are sexually active to get themselves tested for STD’s.

School Based Testing Program in DC Public and Charter High Schools.

Working on the outreach campaign.

globalpost:

GlobalPost’s Heather Horn writes:

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Zebiba, 28, sits in her purple headscarf in the small clinic room, the cramping already beginning. She took the tablets early this morning. She is three months pregnant.

By 2 p.m., her abortion should be complete. She will return to her two children, now at school. She is divorcing their father, who has taken a second wife.

Thus far, she has refused pain medications. Her relief at the ease of this termination is palpable. “She was nervous coming here,” says the nurse.

A generation ago, botched abortions were the single biggest contributor to Ethiopia’s sky-high maternal mortality rate. Doctors in the largest public hospital in Addis Ababa, where Zebiba lives, still remember the time when three-quarters of the beds in the maternal ward were reserved purely for complications from such procedures.

Then, in 2005, the country liberalized its abortion law.

Today, it’s hard to find a health provider who’s seen more than one abortion-related death in the past five years. Although access to safe procedures and high quality care could still be expanded, doctors say that, increasingly, those who need an abortion can get one safely.

Read the full piece here: How Ethiopia solved its abortion problem

Photos by Heather Horn/GlobalPost

gov-info:

September 7-12, 2014 is Suicide Prevention Week [U.S. resources]
WHO Doc: Preventing Suicide-A Global imperative
Suicides occur in all regions of the world and throughout the lifespan. Notably, among young people 15-29 years of age, suicide is the second leading cause of death globally. Suicide impacts on the most vulnerable of the world’s populations and is highly prevalent in already marginalized and discriminated groups of society. It is not just a serious public health problem in developed countries; in fact, most suicides occur in low- and middle-income countries where resources and services, if they do exist, are often scarce and limited for early identification, treatment and support of people in need.
These striking facts and the lack of implemented timely interventions make suicide a global public health problem that needs to be tackled imperatively. This report is the first WHO publication of its kind and brings together what is known in a convenient form so that immediate actions can be taken.
The report aims to increase the awareness of the public health significance of suicide and suicide attempts and to make suicide prevention a higher priority on the global public health agenda… It proposes practical guidance on strategic actions that governments can take on the basis of their resources and existing suicide prevention activities. In particular, there are evidence-based and low-cost interventions that are effective, even in resource-poor settings.

gov-info:

September 7-12, 2014 is Suicide Prevention Week [U.S. resources]

WHO Doc: Preventing Suicide-A Global imperative

Suicides occur in all regions of the world and throughout the lifespan. Notably, among young people 15-29 years of age, suicide is the second leading cause of death globally. Suicide impacts on the most vulnerable of the world’s populations and is highly prevalent in already marginalized and discriminated groups of society. It is not just a serious public health problem in developed countries; in fact, most suicides occur in low- and middle-income countries where resources and services, if they do exist, are often scarce and limited for early identification, treatment and support of people in need.

These striking facts and the lack of implemented timely interventions make suicide a global public health problem that needs to be tackled imperatively. This report is the first WHO publication of its kind and brings together what is known in a convenient form so that immediate actions can be taken.

The report aims to increase the awareness of the public health significance of suicide and suicide attempts and to make suicide prevention a higher priority on the global public health agenda… It proposes practical guidance on strategic actions that governments can take on the basis of their resources and existing suicide prevention activities. In particular, there are evidence-based and low-cost interventions that are effective, even in resource-poor settings.

gov-info:

September 10 is Suicide Prevention Day [resources]
SAMSHA & MIMH Gov App: Suicide Lifeguard
Suicide Lifeguard is a FREE app intended for anyone concerned that someone they know may be thinking of suicide. It provides information on:
• How to recognize warning signs of suicide • How to ask about suicidal thoughts and/or intentions • How to respond and • Where to refer
Features include:
• Immediate connection to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline • Specific resources for:
o Military/Veterans o Those who identify as LGBTQ o Spanish speaking individuals o Persons who are deaf or hard of hearing
• Direct access to national and Missouri resource websites

gov-info:

September 10 is Suicide Prevention Day [resources]

SAMSHA & MIMH Gov App: Suicide Lifeguard

Suicide Lifeguard is a FREE app intended for anyone concerned that someone they know may be thinking of suicide. It provides information on:

• How to recognize warning signs of suicide
• How to ask about suicidal thoughts and/or intentions
• How to respond and
• Where to refer

Features include:

• Immediate connection to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
• Specific resources for:

o Military/Veterans
o Those who identify as LGBTQ
o Spanish speaking individuals
o Persons who are deaf or hard of hearing

• Direct access to national and Missouri resource websites

nprglobalhealth:

Get The Measles, Get Ready To Be Out For Two Weeks
Measles is often lumped in with flu and chickenpox as mild childhood illnesses. But people who got measles during outbreaks in the United Kingdom say they were pretty darned sick, missing two weeks of school or work on average.
A bout of the measles lasted 14 days on average, according to a study by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Public Health England. That added up to having to take 10 days off work or school. More than a third of people needed someone to stay home to take care of them, too.
And they felt crummy. This study is one of the few that actually asks people how they feel when they’re sick. They said they felt high levels of pain and anxiety, and weren’t able to do their usual activities.
"People with the measles report that they’re far more sick than if they have flu or chickenpox," Dominic Thorrington, a graduate student in epidemiology and lead author of the study, told Shots. The study was published Tuesday in the journal PLoS ONE.
The researchers asked people who had become infected during the 2012 and 2013 measles epidemics in the United Kingdom how they felt and how they coped.
Being unable to manage school, work and other usual activities was the biggest complaint, with 97 percent of people saying they had severe problems or some problems with that. Another 90 percent said they suffered pain or discomfort. About half said measles severely compromised their mobility, and 40 percent said they couldn’t care for themselves.
Continue reading.
Photo: Helen Down holds her 14-month-old daughter, Amelia, for an MMR shot in Swansea, England, in April 2013. The vaccination was in response to a measles outbreak. (Geoff Caddick/AFP/Getty Images)

nprglobalhealth:

Get The Measles, Get Ready To Be Out For Two Weeks

Measles is often lumped in with flu and chickenpox as mild childhood illnesses. But people who got measles during outbreaks in the United Kingdom say they were pretty darned sick, missing two weeks of school or work on average.

A bout of the measles lasted 14 days on average, according to a study by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Public Health England. That added up to having to take 10 days off work or school. More than a third of people needed someone to stay home to take care of them, too.

And they felt crummy. This study is one of the few that actually asks people how they feel when they’re sick. They said they felt high levels of pain and anxiety, and weren’t able to do their usual activities.

"People with the measles report that they’re far more sick than if they have flu or chickenpox," Dominic Thorrington, a graduate student in epidemiology and lead author of the study, told Shots. The study was published Tuesday in the journal PLoS ONE.

The researchers asked people who had become infected during the 2012 and 2013 measles epidemics in the United Kingdom how they felt and how they coped.

Being unable to manage school, work and other usual activities was the biggest complaint, with 97 percent of people saying they had severe problems or some problems with that. Another 90 percent said they suffered pain or discomfort. About half said measles severely compromised their mobility, and 40 percent said they couldn’t care for themselves.

Continue reading.

Photo: Helen Down holds her 14-month-old daughter, Amelia, for an MMR shot in Swansea, England, in April 2013. The vaccination was in response to a measles outbreak. (Geoff Caddick/AFP/Getty Images)

nychealth:

Today is the first ever NYC Overdose Awareness Day!

Mayor Bill de Blasio issued a proclamation declaring September 9, 2014 New York City Overdose Awareness Day.

As part of the events, NYC Health held a public training event on overdose prevention where we raised awareness about opioid overdose and distributed 200 doses of naloxone.

According to a new Health Department report, 77% of  NYC’s drug overdose deaths in 2013 involved an opioid, including opioid analgesics (prescription painkillers), methadone, or heroin. On average, there is more than one fatal opioid overdose a day in New York City.

Since 2010, more than 25,000 naloxone kits have been distributed and at least 500 overdoses in New York City have been reversed by using naloxone. In addition to distributing naloxone, NYC Health promotes access to treatment for opioid addiction, including medication assisted treatment through buprenorphine and methadone.

Thank you to everyone who participated in today’s events! To find out where you can get an overdose rescue kit with naloxone, call 311 and ask for “overdose prevention.”

You can also visit our website to learn more about overdose prevention. To connect with free, confidential 24/7 help and support to stop using, call 1-800-LIFENET (800-543-3638) or 311.

actgnetwork:

Three cases of bacterial meningitis have been reported among gay men living with HIV in Brooklyn and Queens since Aug. 24. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene recommends meningitis vaccination for all HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Vaccinations were also advised for men who regularly hook up with other men through a website, app, or at a bar or party – regardless of their HIV status.
#hiv #aids #gay #menshealth #meningitis #nyc http://ift.tt/1CJcWxw

actgnetwork:

Three cases of bacterial meningitis have been reported among gay men living with HIV in Brooklyn and Queens since Aug. 24. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene recommends meningitis vaccination for all HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Vaccinations were also advised for men who regularly hook up with other men through a website, app, or at a bar or party – regardless of their HIV status.
#hiv #aids #gay #menshealth #meningitis #nyc http://ift.tt/1CJcWxw

ottawahealth:

image

To mark the release of our State of Ottawa’s Health 2014 report, we asked slam poet ArRay of WoRds to deliver his spoken word on public health in Ottawa.

Check it out and please help us spread the word!

Join the conversation. We invite you to tell us what public health issues are…