Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


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guardian:

Ebola: How to avoid catching it and other key questions

Safety Before Beauty

ottawahealth:

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Personal Services Settings” (PSS) include businesses that most of us frequent on a regular basis and include a  wide range of services like tattooing, body modification, piercings, haircuts, manicures, pedicures, electrolysis  and many more. Ottawa Public Health (OPH) does many things to inform and protect the public at these establishments, such as operator training, health inspections, and public education.

Recently, OPH surveyed the public to get a pulse of how often Ottawa residents access these types of services. To no one’s surprise, the vast majority of respondents indicated that they had been to a hair salon and had received a manicure or pedicure. After all, who doesn’t like getting their hair and nails done?! More surprising, however, was the high number of people who indicated that they have had at least one piercing and/or tattoo, and many who have had purchased more invasive, non-traditional personal service procedures.

FAQs
How often are Personal Service Settings Inspected?
OPH Public Health Inspectors inspect PSS once a year to ensure they meet all infection prevention and control practices, as outlined in the provincial PSS standards.

Where can I find the latest inspection results of a PSS?
In order to ensure that the public is well-informed with up-to-date inspection results, residents can now visit ottawa.ca/PSSinspections to view the inspection history of a given PSS facility. This site is also mobile friendly to provide residents with better access no matter what device they are using - helping them make informed decisions.

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CDC and Frontier Airlines Announce Passenger Notification Underway
On the morning of Oct. 14, the second healthcare worker reported to the hospital with a low-grade fever and was isolated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirms that the second healthcare worker who tested positive last night for Ebola traveled by air Oct. 13, the day before she reported symptoms.
Because of the proximity in time between the evening flight and first report of illness the following morning, CDC is reaching out to passengers who flew on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth Oct. 13.
CDC is asking all 132 passengers on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth on October 13 (the flight route was Cleveland to Dallas Fort Worth and landed at 8:16 p.m. CT) to call 1 800-CDC INFO (1 800 232-4636). After 1 p.m. ET, public health professionals will begin interviewing passengers about the flight, answering their questions, and arranging follow up. Individuals who are determined to be at any potential risk will be actively monitored.
The healthcare worker exhibited no signs or symptoms of illness while on flight 1143, according to the crew. Frontier is working closely with CDC to identify and notify passengers who may have traveled on flight 1143 on Oct. 13.  Passengers who may have traveled on flight 1143 should contact CDC at 1 800-CDC INFO (1 800 232-4636).
Frontier Airlines Statement
“At approximately 1:00 a.m. MT on October 15, Frontier was notified by the CDC that a customer traveling on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth on Oct. 13 has since tested positive for the Ebola virus. The flight landed in Dallas/Fort Worth at 8:16 p.m. local and remained overnight at the airport having completed its flying for the day at which point the aircraft received a thorough cleaning per our normal procedures which is consistent with CDC guidelines prior to returning to service the next day. It was also cleaned again in Cleveland last night. Previously the customer had traveled from Dallas Fort Worth to Cleveland on Frontier flight 1142 on October 10.
Customer exhibited no symptoms or sign of illness while on flight 1143, according to the crew. Frontier responded immediately upon notification from the CDC by removing the aircraft from service and is working closely with CDC to identify and contact customers who may traveled on flight 1143.
Customers who may have traveled on either flight should contact CDC at 1 800 CDC-INFO.
The safety and security of our customers and employees is our primary concern. Frontier will continue to work closely with CDC and other governmental agencies to ensure proper protocols and procedures are being followed.”
For more information on ebola, visit http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola.
(From CDC)

CDC and Frontier Airlines Announce Passenger Notification Underway

On the morning of Oct. 14, the second healthcare worker reported to the hospital with a low-grade fever and was isolated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirms that the second healthcare worker who tested positive last night for Ebola traveled by air Oct. 13, the day before she reported symptoms.

Because of the proximity in time between the evening flight and first report of illness the following morning, CDC is reaching out to passengers who flew on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth Oct. 13.

CDC is asking all 132 passengers on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth on October 13 (the flight route was Cleveland to Dallas Fort Worth and landed at 8:16 p.m. CT) to call 1 800-CDC INFO (1 800 232-4636). After 1 p.m. ET, public health professionals will begin interviewing passengers about the flight, answering their questions, and arranging follow up. Individuals who are determined to be at any potential risk will be actively monitored.

The healthcare worker exhibited no signs or symptoms of illness while on flight 1143, according to the crew. Frontier is working closely with CDC to identify and notify passengers who may have traveled on flight 1143 on Oct. 13.  Passengers who may have traveled on flight 1143 should contact CDC at 1 800-CDC INFO (1 800 232-4636).

Frontier Airlines Statement

“At approximately 1:00 a.m. MT on October 15, Frontier was notified by the CDC that a customer traveling on Frontier Airlines flight 1143 Cleveland to Dallas/Fort Worth on Oct. 13 has since tested positive for the Ebola virus. The flight landed in Dallas/Fort Worth at 8:16 p.m. local and remained overnight at the airport having completed its flying for the day at which point the aircraft received a thorough cleaning per our normal procedures which is consistent with CDC guidelines prior to returning to service the next day. It was also cleaned again in Cleveland last night. Previously the customer had traveled from Dallas Fort Worth to Cleveland on Frontier flight 1142 on October 10.

Customer exhibited no symptoms or sign of illness while on flight 1143, according to the crew. Frontier responded immediately upon notification from the CDC by removing the aircraft from service and is working closely with CDC to identify and contact customers who may traveled on flight 1143.

Customers who may have traveled on either flight should contact CDC at 1 800 CDC-INFO.

The safety and security of our customers and employees is our primary concern. Frontier will continue to work closely with CDC and other governmental agencies to ensure proper protocols and procedures are being followed.”

For more information on ebola, visit http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola.

(From CDC)

Proper handwashing is the single most effective way to prevent the spread of infections

ottawahealth:

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Today is Global Handwashing Day. Proper handwashing is the single most effective way to prevent the spread of infections.

Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 15 seconds or use hand sanitizer. For more information visit OttawaPublicHealth.ca

unicef:

Today is Global Handwashing Day! Handwashing with soap is one of the most cost-effective methods to stop the spread of viral diseases such as diarrhoea - the second biggest killer of children under 5. It also plays an important role in the fight against #Ebola.On #GlobalHandwashingDay - and every day - the power is in your hands!http://uni.cf/1vvhkOS

unicef:

Today is Global Handwashing Day! 

Handwashing with soap is one of the most cost-effective methods to stop the spread of viral diseases such as diarrhoea - the second biggest killer of children under 5. It also plays an important role in the fight against #Ebola.

On #GlobalHandwashingDay - and every day - the power is in your hands!http://uni.cf/1vvhkOS

Too much medicine
The BMJ’s Too Much Medicine campaign aims to highlight the threat to human health posed by overdiagnosis and the waste of resources on unnecessary care.
There is growing evidence that many people are overdiagnosed and overtreated for a wide range of conditions, such as prostate and thyroid cancers, asthma, and chronic kidney disease.
Through the campaign, the journal plans to work with others to increase awareness of the benefits and harms of treatments and technologies and develop ways to wind back medical excess, safely and fairly. This editorial by Fiona Godlee, editor in chief of The BMJ and overdiagnosis researcher Ray Moynihan, senior research fellow at Bond University, Australia, explains more about the campaign:
Dr Godlee said: “Like the evidence based medicine and quality and safety movements of previous decades, combatting excess is a contemporary manifestation of a much older desire to avoid doing harm when we try to help or heal.
"Making such efforts even more necessary are the growing concerns about escalating healthcare spending and the threats to health from climate change. Winding back unnecessary tests and treatments, unhelpful labels and diagnoses won’t only benefit those who directly avoid harm, it can also help us create a more sustainable future."
The BMJ was a partner in the international scientific conference, Preventing Overdiagnosis, held in September 2013 in Hanover, New Hampshire. The conference brought together the research and researchers, advanced the science of the problem and its solutions, and developed ways to better communicate about this modern epidemic.
(From The British Medical Journal, BMJ)

Too much medicine

The BMJ’s Too Much Medicine campaign aims to highlight the threat to human health posed by overdiagnosis and the waste of resources on unnecessary care.

There is growing evidence that many people are overdiagnosed and overtreated for a wide range of conditions, such as prostate and thyroid cancers, asthma, and chronic kidney disease.

Through the campaign, the journal plans to work with others to increase awareness of the benefits and harms of treatments and technologies and develop ways to wind back medical excess, safely and fairly. This editorial by Fiona Godlee, editor in chief of The BMJ and overdiagnosis researcher Ray Moynihan, senior research fellow at Bond University, Australia, explains more about the campaign:

Dr Godlee said: “Like the evidence based medicine and quality and safety movements of previous decades, combatting excess is a contemporary manifestation of a much older desire to avoid doing harm when we try to help or heal.

"Making such efforts even more necessary are the growing concerns about escalating healthcare spending and the threats to health from climate change. Winding back unnecessary tests and treatments, unhelpful labels and diagnoses won’t only benefit those who directly avoid harm, it can also help us create a more sustainable future."

The BMJ was a partner in the international scientific conference, Preventing Overdiagnosis, held in September 2013 in Hanover, New Hampshire. The conference brought together the research and researchers, advanced the science of the problem and its solutions, and developed ways to better communicate about this modern epidemic.

(From The British Medical Journal, BMJ)

Ebola in the U.S.—Politics and Public Health Don’t Mix
By Judy Stone
“Against stupidity, even the gods strive in vain.” — Fredirich Schiller
I’ve been glued to the Ebola news, riding the roller coaster of emotions. While  very impressed with CDC’s director, Dr. Tom Frieden’s, initial press conference (10/2/14), I became infuriated at the subsequent statements from Lisa Monaco, Homeland Security Advisor, and the tragicomedy of the Dallas hospital’s farcical response, prompting this post.
Dr. Frieden was calm, reassuring and authoritative in handling this CDC press conference. He conveyed the critical messages well, “Remember, Ebola does not spread from someone who is not infectious. It does not spread from someone who doesn’t have fever and other symptoms. It’s only someone who is sick with Ebola who can spread the disease.” And he was candid: “It is certainly possible that someone who had contact with this individual, a family member or other individual could develop Ebola in the coming weeks. But there is no doubt in my mind that we will stop it here.” He emphasized basic, proven public health strategies of careful infection control, contact tracing, and isolation.
In contrast, although she acknowledged the possibility of a secondary case, Ms. Monaco appeared less credible as she stated, “I want to emphasize that the United States is prepared to deal with this crisis both at home and in the region. Every Ebola outbreak over the past 40 years has been stopped. We know how to do this and we will do it again.”
While I agree that we have the knowledge, experience, and resources to be able to control Ebola, most of the experts are academicians or practice in relatively well-heeled ivory towers. I have practiced Infectious Diseases and Infection Control for 30+ years, primarily in a number of community hospitals, and offer a different perspective here, based on these experiences.
Administrators vs. Practitioners
Increasingly, decision makers are administrators who are disconnected from the realities of patient care. The latest fad, for example is to design hospitals to look like hotels and be “inviting” to patients, although they are very dysfunctional for delivering patient care, especially problematic in ICUs.
Similarly, when “bioterrorism preparedness” first became the rage, our hospital and health department focused on high tech units and hazmat suits while ignoring basic hygiene. I went ballistic, given that there was no soap nor any paper towels in the public school bathrooms, something the county health commissioner said was “not within their purview.” Gotta have priorities, right?
It is not all that different now. One hospital I am familiar with has Powered Air Purifying respirators (PAPRs), purchased with bioterrorism preparedness grants, but neither stethoscopes nor other dedicated equipment for isolation rooms. So nurses and docs gown up to go in the room of a patient with a “superbug” but take their stethoscopes into the room and then on to other patients, perhaps remembering to wipe it down first.
The problems with controlling Ebola cases in the United States is not that we can’t care for people well, or with good infection control. We absolutely can. But the Dallas case abundantly illustrates some of the problems in caring for anyone with a communicable illness, whether a antibiotic resistant organism (aka “superbug) like carbapenem resistant enterobacter (CRE), measles or Ebola.
(More from Scientific American)

Ebola in the U.S.—Politics and Public Health Don’t Mix

By Judy Stone

“Against stupidity, even the gods strive in vain.” — Fredirich Schiller

I’ve been glued to the Ebola news, riding the roller coaster of emotions. While  very impressed with CDC’s director, Dr. Tom Frieden’s, initial press conference (10/2/14), I became infuriated at the subsequent statements from Lisa Monaco, Homeland Security Advisor, and the tragicomedy of the Dallas hospital’s farcical response, prompting this post.

Dr. Frieden was calm, reassuring and authoritative in handling this CDC press conference. He conveyed the critical messages well, “Remember, Ebola does not spread from someone who is not infectious. It does not spread from someone who doesn’t have fever and other symptoms. It’s only someone who is sick with Ebola who can spread the disease.” And he was candid: “It is certainly possible that someone who had contact with this individual, a family member or other individual could develop Ebola in the coming weeks. But there is no doubt in my mind that we will stop it here.” He emphasized basic, proven public health strategies of careful infection control, contact tracing, and isolation.

In contrast, although she acknowledged the possibility of a secondary case, Ms. Monaco appeared less credible as she stated, “I want to emphasize that the United States is prepared to deal with this crisis both at home and in the region. Every Ebola outbreak over the past 40 years has been stopped. We know how to do this and we will do it again.”

While I agree that we have the knowledge, experience, and resources to be able to control Ebola, most of the experts are academicians or practice in relatively well-heeled ivory towers. I have practiced Infectious Diseases and Infection Control for 30+ years, primarily in a number of community hospitals, and offer a different perspective here, based on these experiences.

Administrators vs. Practitioners

Increasingly, decision makers are administrators who are disconnected from the realities of patient care. The latest fad, for example is to design hospitals to look like hotels and be “inviting” to patients, although they are very dysfunctional for delivering patient care, especially problematic in ICUs.

Similarly, when “bioterrorism preparedness” first became the rage, our hospital and health department focused on high tech units and hazmat suits while ignoring basic hygiene. I went ballistic, given that there was no soap nor any paper towels in the public school bathrooms, something the county health commissioner said was “not within their purview.” Gotta have priorities, right?

It is not all that different now. One hospital I am familiar with has Powered Air Purifying respirators (PAPRs), purchased with bioterrorism preparedness grants, but neither stethoscopes nor other dedicated equipment for isolation rooms. So nurses and docs gown up to go in the room of a patient with a “superbug” but take their stethoscopes into the room and then on to other patients, perhaps remembering to wipe it down first.

The problems with controlling Ebola cases in the United States is not that we can’t care for people well, or with good infection control. We absolutely can. But the Dallas case abundantly illustrates some of the problems in caring for anyone with a communicable illness, whether a antibiotic resistant organism (aka “superbug) like carbapenem resistant enterobacter (CRE), measles or Ebola.

(More from Scientific American)

Keep Your Child from Getting and Spreading Enterovirus D68
Avoid close contact with sick people
Wash your hands often with soap & water
Cover Your coughs and sneezes
Avoid touching your face with unwashed hands
Clean and disinfect surfaces
Stay home when you’re sick
For more information, see www.cdc.gov/non-polio-enterovirus/EV68/
(From CDC)

Keep Your Child from Getting and Spreading Enterovirus D68

  • Avoid close contact with sick people
  • Wash your hands often with soap & water
  • Cover Your coughs and sneezes
  • Avoid touching your face with unwashed hands
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces
  • Stay home when you’re sick

For more information, see www.cdc.gov/non-polio-enterovirus/EV68/

(From CDC)

UK: The health and care system explained
The new health and care system became fully operational on April 1, 2013 to deliver the ambitions set out in the Health and Social Care Act. NHS England, Public Health England, the NHS Trust Development Authority and Health Education England will take on their full range of responsibilities.
Locally, clinical commissioning groups – made up of doctors, nurses and other professionals – will buy services for patients, while local councils formally take on their new roles in promoting public health. Health and wellbeing boards will bring together local organisations to work in partnership and Healthwatch will provide a powerful voice for patients and local communities.
(More from Department of Health, Gov.UK)

UK: The health and care system explained

The new health and care system became fully operational on April 1, 2013 to deliver the ambitions set out in the Health and Social Care Act. NHS England, Public Health England, the NHS Trust Development Authority and Health Education England will take on their full range of responsibilities.

Locally, clinical commissioning groups – made up of doctors, nurses and other professionals – will buy services for patients, while local councils formally take on their new roles in promoting public health. Health and wellbeing boards will bring together local organisations to work in partnership and Healthwatch will provide a powerful voice for patients and local communities.

(More from Department of Health, Gov.UK)