Public Health
Public Health is the science of protecting and improving the health of communities through education, promotion of healthy lifestyles, and research for disease and injury prevention. (What is Public Health? Association of Schools of Public Health )

Five Minutes Or Less For Health


Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget. Flash Player 9 is required.
Five Minutes Or Less For Health Widget.
Flash Player 9 is required.

nychealth:

Get Health Bucks!
There are a few ways for you to get Health Bucks to use on fresh fruits and vegetables at our farmers’ markets:

1. Shop at a farmers’ market using your EBT card – for every $5 you spend using EBT, you’ll receive a $2 Health Buck!
Find out which markets accept EBT. Most do! And those that don’t are noted on our map.
Visit the market information tent and look for the market manager .
Tell the market manager how much you plan to spend using your SNAP benefits.
Swipe your EBT card to purchase as many wooden tokens as you’ll need (most markets use tokens for EBT, credit or debit purchases). These tokens act like cash at the market, can be spent at the farmers’ tables and never expire. (Remember: you will receive one $2 Health Buck for every $5 you spend in EBT.)


2. Participate in an activity at a community-based organization that distributes Health Bucks.
3. Attend a free nutrition and cooking demonstration or food workshop for kids. You’ll also receive free tastings, as well as nutrition and recipe handouts in addition to the Health Buck.
Look for the carrot and apple icons on our map to find participating markets.
Redeem your Health Bucks (at any market)!
1. Go to your local farmers’ market.
2. Find items that you would like to purchase.
3. Give the farmer your $2 Health Buck as payment for your fresh fruits and vegetables!

nychealth:

Get Health Bucks!

There are a few ways for you to get Health Bucks to use on fresh fruits and vegetables at our farmers’ markets:

1. Shop at a farmers’ market using your EBT card – for every $5 you spend using EBT, you’ll receive a $2 Health Buck!

  • Find out which markets accept EBT. Most do! And those that don’t are noted on our map.
  • Visit the market information tent and look for the market manager .
  • Tell the market manager how much you plan to spend using your SNAP benefits.
  • Swipe your EBT card to purchase as many wooden tokens as you’ll need (most markets use tokens for EBT, credit or debit purchases). These tokens act like cash at the market, can be spent at the farmers’ tables and never expire. (Remember: you will receive one $2 Health Buck for every $5 you spend in EBT.)

2. Participate in an activity at a community-based organization that distributes Health Bucks.

3. Attend a free nutrition and cooking demonstration or food workshop for kids. You’ll also receive free tastings, as well as nutrition and recipe handouts in addition to the Health Buck.

  • Look for the carrot and apple icons on our map to find participating markets.

Redeem your Health Bucks (at any market)!

1. Go to your local farmers’ market.

2. Find items that you would like to purchase.

3. Give the farmer your $2 Health Buck as payment for your fresh fruits and vegetables!

nprglobalhealth:

Feeling The Heat, Burning The Suits: Reporting On Ebola From Sierra Leone

NPR’s Jason Beaubien is in Sierra Leone, covering the Ebola outbreak that began in March in Guinea and has spread to neighboring countries. When we spoke Thursday, he had just toured the treatment center built by Doctors Without Borders in the town of Kailahun. With 64 beds, it’s the largest Ebola isolation ward ever built. Currently there are 31 patients.

How’s it going?

Never a dull day here.

Can you describe the treatment center?

It’s basically a compound with a series of different tents. There are tents where people get suited up to go in. Another tent seems to be for storage, and one of the tents contains a lab. Then there’s a double fence about 3 1/2 feet high, made of orange plastic mesh. They designed the fence so people can see where the patients are, so it wouldn’t seem as if the patients are completely walled off.

Why a double fence?

So no one can get within 6 feet of someone who has Ebola. In case a patient from the isolation area reaches out or vomits, [Doctors Without Borders] wants to make sure there won’t be any accidental contamination.

How do the doctors record information on the patients?

Doctors go into the isolation area completely suited up, do their rounds and write down what’s happening with patients. Then they stand next to the fence and shout out to people on the other side of the fence [information about each patient]. Say, for patient 105, the doctor says, “diarrhea, vomiting.” Then the doctor’s notes [made inside the isolation area] are burned.

Where do they burn the notes?

They have a big pit in the back.

What else do they burn?

They burn everything. They say nothing comes out of isolation — although obviously they’re taking blood samples out. People come out. They strip off their protective gear, the Tyvek suits they put over their entire body and shoes.

Continue reading.

Top: Construction workers repair the roof inside the isolation area at the Doctors Without Borders treatment center in Kailahun.

Bottom: All workers in the isolation area must wear a head-to-toe protective suit.

Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR

actgnetwork:

It is with great sadness that we acknowledge the death of Joep Lange on Malaysia Airlines flight 017. Joep was an extraordinary clinician, scientist, and humanitarian who fought ceaselessly for the rights of persons living with HIV/AIDS and to assure global access to antiretroviral therapy. Joep was a great friend of the ACTG—he chaired the review of the ACTG during a previous competitive renewal cycle and provided invaluable insights through formal and informal consultation that helped shape the current ACTG agenda. Many of us in the ACTG counted Joep and his partner, Jacqueline, as esteemed colleagues and cherished friends. The impact of their loss is immeasurable. We offer our deepest condolences to their families and colleagues, and we are committed to redouble our efforts to realizing the vision to which Joep had devoted his life.
- Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, ACTG Chair #hiv #aids #research #mh17 http://ift.tt/1teLvpi

actgnetwork:

It is with great sadness that we acknowledge the death of Joep Lange on Malaysia Airlines flight 017. Joep was an extraordinary clinician, scientist, and humanitarian who fought ceaselessly for the rights of persons living with HIV/AIDS and to assure global access to antiretroviral therapy. Joep was a great friend of the ACTG—he chaired the review of the ACTG during a previous competitive renewal cycle and provided invaluable insights through formal and informal consultation that helped shape the current ACTG agenda. Many of us in the ACTG counted Joep and his partner, Jacqueline, as esteemed colleagues and cherished friends. The impact of their loss is immeasurable. We offer our deepest condolences to their families and colleagues, and we are committed to redouble our efforts to realizing the vision to which Joep had devoted his life.
- Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, ACTG Chair #hiv #aids #research #mh17 http://ift.tt/1teLvpi

gov-info:

CDC & HHS Gov Docs: Health Information in 33 Languages

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) offers free, downloadable fact sheets, pamphlets and educational materials available in many languages

Order or download books, fact sheets, pamphlets, and educational materials at CDC-INFO on Demand. If you’re ordering fewer than 5 of any item, please consider downloading the items. Visit CDC Stacks to download materials only available online.

nprglobalhealth:

Facing A Toxic Dump In South Africa, He Cleaned Up
Desmond D’Sa helped shut down a toxic landfill.
The landfill was located in South Durban — an industrialized city teeming with petrochemical plants, paper mills and oil refineries. D’Sa and his family had been forcibly relocated to the area by the apartheid government in the 1970s, together with thousands of other Indian and black South Africans. The apartheid government was notorious for forcing nonwhite laborers to live in the industrial areas where they worked.
In 2009, the landfill — which had operated for nearly 20 years — was looking to extend its lease. That’s when D’Sa, the coordinator of the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance, began fighting back. Earlier this year, he was awarded the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize for his efforts. We asked D’Sa about his quest to keep his community clean.
Why did you become an environmental activist?
In the early 1990s, I was working for the state oil corporation. I worked in a chemical plant, and I had done safety and risk [assessment], so I saw the damage to workers and that made me realize that the work we were doing was quite toxic and dangerous, and could affect our community as well.
At night I started to go to the [safety research] lab to get documents, and I would read up and try to understand what was going on [with hazardous waste disposal]. When I confronted management, they said, “We don’t need people like you here.” In 1998, I was fired while I was on holiday. That’s when I began working full-time as an environmental activist. They unleashed a monster.
What was the key to your campaign against the landfill?
Carefully documenting everything. We brought in health experts and researchers from the Durban University of Technology and from the U.S. We got people in the community to write down the problems they were experiencing. We took photos and videos, and collected [water and air] samples and worked with researchers to analyze them.
Beyond that, the key is very simple: Work all the time and talk a lot. Get up early in the morning, and get on the road. Talk to people in communities and churches. Leave your cellphone on.
Continue reading.
Photo: Desmond D’Sa stands by the landfill he helped shut down in Durban. (Goldman Environmental Prize)

nprglobalhealth:

Facing A Toxic Dump In South Africa, He Cleaned Up

Desmond D’Sa helped shut down a toxic landfill.

The landfill was located in South Durban — an industrialized city teeming with petrochemical plants, paper mills and oil refineries. D’Sa and his family had been forcibly relocated to the area by the apartheid government in the 1970s, together with thousands of other Indian and black South Africans. The apartheid government was notorious for forcing nonwhite laborers to live in the industrial areas where they worked.

In 2009, the landfill — which had operated for nearly 20 years — was looking to extend its lease. That’s when D’Sa, the coordinator of the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance, began fighting back. Earlier this year, he was awarded the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize for his efforts. We asked D’Sa about his quest to keep his community clean.

Why did you become an environmental activist?

In the early 1990s, I was working for the state oil corporation. I worked in a chemical plant, and I had done safety and risk [assessment], so I saw the damage to workers and that made me realize that the work we were doing was quite toxic and dangerous, and could affect our community as well.

At night I started to go to the [safety research] lab to get documents, and I would read up and try to understand what was going on [with hazardous waste disposal]. When I confronted management, they said, “We don’t need people like you here.” In 1998, I was fired while I was on holiday. That’s when I began working full-time as an environmental activist. They unleashed a monster.

What was the key to your campaign against the landfill?

Carefully documenting everything. We brought in health experts and researchers from the Durban University of Technology and from the U.S. We got people in the community to write down the problems they were experiencing. We took photos and videos, and collected [water and air] samples and worked with researchers to analyze them.

Beyond that, the key is very simple: Work all the time and talk a lot. Get up early in the morning, and get on the road. Talk to people in communities and churches. Leave your cellphone on.

Continue reading.

Photo: Desmond D’Sa stands by the landfill he helped shut down in Durban. (Goldman Environmental Prize)

Gaining Ground: Americans’ Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care After the Affordable Care Act’s First Open Enrollment Period
Overview
A new Commonwealth Fund survey finds that in the wake of the Affordable Care Act’s first open enrollment period, significantly fewer working-age adults are uninsured than just before the sign-up period began, and many have used their new coverage to obtain needed care.
What do Americans think about their Obamacare coverage? Quick view
The uninsured rate for people ages 19 to 64 declined from 20 percent in the July-to-September 2013 period to 15 percent in the April-to-June 2014 period. An estimated 9.5 million fewer adults were uninsured. Young men and women drove a large part of the decline: the uninsured rate for 19-to-34-year-olds declined from 28 percent to 18 percent, with an estimated 5.7 million fewer young adults uninsured. By June, 60 percent of adults with new coverage through the marketplaces or Medicaid reported they had visited a doctor or hospital or filled a prescription; of these, 62 percent said they could not have accessed or afforded this care previously.
(More from The Commonwealth Fund)

Gaining Ground: Americans’ Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care After the Affordable Care Act’s First Open Enrollment Period

Overview

A new Commonwealth Fund survey finds that in the wake of the Affordable Care Act’s first open enrollment period, significantly fewer working-age adults are uninsured than just before the sign-up period began, and many have used their new coverage to obtain needed care.

What do Americans think about their Obamacare coverage? Quick view

The uninsured rate for people ages 19 to 64 declined from 20 percent in the July-to-September 2013 period to 15 percent in the April-to-June 2014 period. An estimated 9.5 million fewer adults were uninsured. Young men and women drove a large part of the decline: the uninsured rate for 19-to-34-year-olds declined from 28 percent to 18 percent, with an estimated 5.7 million fewer young adults uninsured. By June, 60 percent of adults with new coverage through the marketplaces or Medicaid reported they had visited a doctor or hospital or filled a prescription; of these, 62 percent said they could not have accessed or afforded this care previously.

(More from The Commonwealth Fund)

Last call. Game over. Polio ends with us.

When Rotary set out to end polio more than 25 years ago, there were over 350,000 cases of this crippling disease every year. Children in 125 countries lost their ability to run, walk and play–forever. Since then, we’ve eradicated 99% of this devastating disease. The end is so close we can see it. Our generation will be the last to see the crippling effects of polio. What else will your generation be the last to see?

unicef:

“I told my parents I would not get married now; I am too young for that. I would not be able to continue my study if I get married.” 

Kalpona was 12 when her parents arranged for her to marry a man more than twice her age. A few days before the wedding, they agreed to let her continue with school instead.

In Bangladesh, 65% of girls are married as children. Pledge your support for ending child marriage within a generation:http://uni.cf/GS14

unicef:

“I told my parents I would not get married now; I am too young for that. I would not be able to continue my study if I get married.”

Kalpona was 12 when her parents arranged for her to marry a man more than twice her age. A few days before the wedding, they agreed to let her continue with school instead.

In Bangladesh, 65% of girls are married as children. Pledge your support for ending child marriage within a generation:http://uni.cf/GS14

QuickTake: Number of Uninsured Adults Continues to Fall under the ACA: Down by 8.0 Million in June 2014
The Urban Institute’s Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS) has been tracking insurance coverage since the first quarter of 2013. This QuickTake reports on how the uninsurance rate changed through early June 2014. These results track changes in coverage following the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) first open enrollment period, which ended on March 31, 2014.

 
Analysis of data from the June 2014 HRMS shows the uninsurance rate for nonelderly adults (age 18–64) was 13.9 percent (95% CI [12.3, 15.4]) for the nation in June, a drop of 4.0 percentage points (95% CI [2.6, 5.5]) since September 2013, the month before the ACA’s initial open enrollment period began. This represents a drop of 22.3 percent in the uninsurance rate, which translates to a net gain in coverage for about 8.0 million adults (95% CI [5.1 million, 10.8 million]), extending the coverage gain of 5.4 million (95% CI [3.2 million, 7.6 million]) that was found as of early March 2014.1 Though estimates of the size of the net gain in coverage vary across surveys, there is consistent evidence of ongoing gains in insurance coverage under the ACA.
(More from the Urban Institute Health Policy Center)

QuickTake: Number of Uninsured Adults Continues to Fall under the ACA: Down by 8.0 Million in June 2014

The Urban Institute’s Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS) has been tracking insurance coverage since the first quarter of 2013. This QuickTake reports on how the uninsurance rate changed through early June 2014. These results track changes in coverage following the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) first open enrollment period, which ended on March 31, 2014.

 

Analysis of data from the June 2014 HRMS shows the uninsurance rate for nonelderly adults (age 18–64) was 13.9 percent (95% CI [12.3, 15.4]) for the nation in June, a drop of 4.0 percentage points (95% CI [2.6, 5.5]) since September 2013, the month before the ACA’s initial open enrollment period began. This represents a drop of 22.3 percent in the uninsurance rate, which translates to a net gain in coverage for about 8.0 million adults (95% CI [5.1 million, 10.8 million]), extending the coverage gain of 5.4 million (95% CI [3.2 million, 7.6 million]) that was found as of early March 2014.1 Though estimates of the size of the net gain in coverage vary across surveys, there is consistent evidence of ongoing gains in insurance coverage under the ACA.

(More from the Urban Institute Health Policy Center)

nychealth:

For this first time this season, NYC Health has detected West Nile Virus in New York City mosquitoes from areas in Queens and Staten Island. No human cases have been reported this season.
New Yorkers are urged to take precautions to prevent exposure to mosquito bites. Some helpful tips:
Use an approved insect repellent containing picaridin, DEET, oil of lemon eucalyptus (not for children under three), or products that contain the active ingredient IR3535.
Make sure windows have screens and repair or replace screens that have tears or holes.
Eliminate any standing water from your property and dispose of containers that can collect water. Standing water is a violation of the New York City Health Code.
Make sure roof gutters are clean and draining properly.
Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas and hot tubs. Keep them empty or covered if not in use; drain water that collects in pool covers.
Report standing water by calling 311 or visiting here.



The Health Department will also apply larvicide by helicopter to marsh and other non-residential areas of Staten Island, the Bronx and Queens on select days July 17-21.
Visit our website to view the continuously updated West Nile Spray & Aerial Larviciding Schedule, track West Nile virus reports and results, and review NYC’s 2014 Comprehensive Mosquito Plan.

nychealth:

For this first time this season, NYC Health has detected West Nile Virus in New York City mosquitoes from areas in Queens and Staten Island. No human cases have been reported this season.

New Yorkers are urged to take precautions to prevent exposure to mosquito bites. Some helpful tips:

  • Use an approved insect repellent containing picaridin, DEET, oil of lemon eucalyptus (not for children under three), or products that contain the active ingredient IR3535.
  • Make sure windows have screens and repair or replace screens that have tears or holes.
  • Eliminate any standing water from your property and dispose of containers that can collect water. Standing water is a violation of the New York City Health Code.
  • Make sure roof gutters are clean and draining properly.
  • Clean and chlorinate swimming pools, outdoor saunas and hot tubs. Keep them empty or covered if not in use; drain water that collects in pool covers.
  • Report standing water by calling 311 or visiting here.

The Health Department will also apply larvicide by helicopter to marsh and other non-residential areas of Staten Island, the Bronx and Queens on select days July 17-21.

Visit our website to view the continuously updated West Nile Spray & Aerial Larviciding Schedule, track West Nile virus reports and results, and review NYC’s 2014 Comprehensive Mosquito Plan.