unicef
unicef:

Meet Moossa, a 6 months old boy from Baghdad – and sadly, Iraq’s first victim of polio in 14 years.
“I never thought that my child could be paralyzed,” says his father, who deeply regrets not having his children vaccinated against this debilitating disease.
Since the detection of Moossa’s case, polio vaccination campaigns have begun in Iraq, Syria and Egypt to reach all children under 5. Read more in our latest blog post: http://uni.cf/1kJIAAk  

unicef:

Meet Moossa, a 6 months old boy from Baghdad – and sadly, Iraq’s first victim of polio in 14 years.

“I never thought that my child could be paralyzed,” says his father, who deeply regrets not having his children vaccinated against this debilitating disease.

Since the detection of Moossa’s case, polio vaccination campaigns have begun in Iraq, Syria and Egypt to reach all children under 5. Read more in our latest blog post: http://uni.cf/1kJIAAk  

nprglobalhealth
nprglobalhealth:

Measles At A Rock Concert Goes Viral
If you went to see the Kings of Leon concert on March 28 in Seattle, let’s hope you came home with nothing but great memories.
A young woman at that concert in Seattle has come down with measles, which can be spread for days by a person who’s infected but not yet sick. That’s bad news for the thousands of people who shared the concert hall with her, or were at the many other places she went that week.
And that’s why the Washington State Department of Health has published the unidentified woman’s schedule online.
"The reason we’re doing this is that it’s so highly contagious," says Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, who is chief of communicable disease control for Seattle and King County Public Health, which investigated the measles case. “It can stay in the air for hours after the contagious person has left. If we don’t treat these people, the chain of transmission can continue.”
The young woman became contagious on March 26, after visiting a family with measles cases that were linked to an outbreak in British Columbia. Unaware she was infected, she went to work at a bakery, filled her car up at a gas station, went to the concert, went to Pike Place Market and went out for sushi. All the while she was spreading viruses in the air.
So if you were at the Starbucks at 102 Pike Street between 11:15 a.m. and 2 p.m. on March 29 and you’re not sure if you’re immune to measles, the Washington State Department of Health wants you to see a health care professional immediately. You may be in the market for a quick shot of vaccine or immune globulin.
Continue reading.
Photo: This one’s virus-free: Matthew Followill, Nathan Followill and Caleb Followill of Kings of Leon performed in Los Angeles in December. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Radio.com)

nprglobalhealth:

Measles At A Rock Concert Goes Viral

If you went to see the Kings of Leon concert on March 28 in Seattle, let’s hope you came home with nothing but great memories.

A young woman at that concert in Seattle has come down with measles, which can be spread for days by a person who’s infected but not yet sick. That’s bad news for the thousands of people who shared the concert hall with her, or were at the many other places she went that week.

And that’s why the Washington State Department of Health has published the unidentified woman’s schedule online.

"The reason we’re doing this is that it’s so highly contagious," says Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, who is chief of communicable disease control for Seattle and King County Public Health, which investigated the measles case. “It can stay in the air for hours after the contagious person has left. If we don’t treat these people, the chain of transmission can continue.”

The young woman became contagious on March 26, after visiting a family with measles cases that were linked to an outbreak in British Columbia. Unaware she was infected, she went to work at a bakery, filled her car up at a gas station, went to the concert, went to Pike Place Market and went out for sushi. All the while she was spreading viruses in the air.

So if you were at the Starbucks at 102 Pike Street between 11:15 a.m. and 2 p.m. on March 29 and you’re not sure if you’re immune to measles, the Washington State Department of Health wants you to see a health care professional immediately. You may be in the market for a quick shot of vaccine or immune globulin.

Continue reading.

Photo: This one’s virus-free: Matthew Followill, Nathan Followill and Caleb Followill of Kings of Leon performed in Los Angeles in December. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Radio.com)

ottawahealth

ottawahealth:

image

ParticipACTION’s #SneakItIn Week returns from April 7 to 11, 2014. Join this movement by wearing your sneakers at work and finding ways to sneak in a few extra steps into your day!

Sneak It in Week aims to get Canadians more physically active during the workday. For many Canadians,…

gov-info
gov-info:

CDC Gov Docs/Site: Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports
Image description: This poster explains the signs and symptoms of concussions and is available for download and printing from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.
Concussions are brain injuries caused by a blow to the head or body that causes the brain to move rapidly inside the skull. They can occur in any sport and without loss of consciousness. Even mild bumps or blows to the head can be serious. Athletes, parents, and coaches need to be able to recognize the signs that a concussion has occurred.
Athletes who have experienced a concussion must be kept from playing until their brain has completely healed, because a repeat concussion increases the likelihood of having long-term problems. Only a health professional with experience in evaluating concussions can say when it’s okay to play, and athletes need to be protected from pressure to get into the game too early.
Signs and Symptoms of Concussions
Symptoms Reported by Athlete:
Headache or “pressure in head”
Nausea or vomiting
Balance problems or dizziness
Double or blurry vision
Sensitivity to light or noise
Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
Concentration or memory problems
Confusion
Does not “feel right”
Signs observed by others:
Appears dazed or stunned
Is confused about assignment or position
Forgets sports plays
Is unsure of game, score, or opponent
Moves clumsily
Answers questions slowly
Loses consciousness (even briefly)
Shows behavior or personality changes
Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall
Can’t recall events after hit or fall
For more information especially for athletes, parents, and coaches such as printable fact sheets, posters, and a online training course, visit Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports from the Centers for Disease Control.
via usa.gov

gov-info:

CDC Gov Docs/Site: Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

Image description: This poster explains the signs and symptoms of concussions and is available for download and printing from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.

Concussions are brain injuries caused by a blow to the head or body that causes the brain to move rapidly inside the skull. They can occur in any sport and without loss of consciousness. Even mild bumps or blows to the head can be serious. Athletes, parents, and coaches need to be able to recognize the signs that a concussion has occurred.

Athletes who have experienced a concussion must be kept from playing until their brain has completely healed, because a repeat concussion increases the likelihood of having long-term problems. Only a health professional with experience in evaluating concussions can say when it’s okay to play, and athletes need to be protected from pressure to get into the game too early.

Signs and Symptoms of Concussions

Symptoms Reported by Athlete:

  • Headache or “pressure in head”
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Balance problems or dizziness
  • Double or blurry vision
  • Sensitivity to light or noise
  • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
  • Concentration or memory problems
  • Confusion
  • Does not “feel right”

Signs observed by others:

  • Appears dazed or stunned
  • Is confused about assignment or position
  • Forgets sports plays
  • Is unsure of game, score, or opponent
  • Moves clumsily
  • Answers questions slowly
  • Loses consciousness (even briefly)
  • Shows behavior or personality changes
  • Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall
  • Can’t recall events after hit or fall

For more information especially for athletes, parents, and coaches such as printable fact sheets, posters, and a online training course, visit Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports from the Centers for Disease Control.

via usa.gov

gov-info
gov-info:

CDC Gov Doc/Data: Trends in Out-of-Hospital Births in the United States, 1990–2012
Table of Contents:
Key findings
In 2012, 1.36% of U.S. births were born outside a hospital, up from 1.26% in 2011.
In 2012, 1 in 49 births to non-Hispanic white women were out-of-hospital births.
The percentage of out-of-hospital births was generally higher in the northwestern United States and lower in the southeastern United States.
Out-of-hospital births generally had a lower risk profile than hospital births.
The risk profile of out-of-hospital births declined from 2004 through 2012.
Summary
Definitions
Data sources and methods
References

gov-info:

CDC Gov Doc/Data: Trends in Out-of-Hospital Births in the United States, 1990–2012

Table of Contents:

Key findings

Summary

Definitions

Data sources and methods

References

breatheeasyusa

breatheeasyusa:

imageApril 7th is World Health Day, a day sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO) to raise awareness of a certain global health issue each year and campaign for change. This year, the WHO is focusing on the massive global health issue that is vector-borne disease. This includes…