ucsdcancer
ucsdcancer:

From our sister blog, questions with one of our experts on what’s known about e-cigarette safety. Although e-cigarettes do not have all the known carcinogens of traditional cigarettes, not enough is known to call them a “safer” alternative. Read more.
ucsdhealthsciences:

To Vape or Not to Vape? We’ve got thee questions for our expert about the supposed safety of e-cigarettes
For the last 50 years cigarette smoking has been on the decline due in large part to aggressive advocacy by health professionals about the risks associated with smoking tobacco, and a once ubiquitous habit has become taboo. Quickly replacing tobacco cigarettes are electronic or e-cigarettes and “vaping” is the new inhaling. E-cigarette availability and popularity are at an all-time high, especially among teens and young adults, with claims of e-cigarette safety driving the trend.
But are e-cigarettes really safe? Recent reports of liquid nicotine poisoning beg to differ and much remains unknown about whether or not inhaling the vapor from e-cigarettes is safer than inhaling smoked tobacco.
We’ve asked John Pierce, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine, Moores Cancer Center director for population sciences and expert on tobacco cessation three questions about the relative safety of e-cigarettes.
Question: What, if anything, is known about the health effects of nicotine delivery from e-cigarettes versus traditional tobacco cigarettes? Are they, as advocates and tobacco companies suggest, safer?Answer: There is no question that a heavy smoker who stops using cigarettes and switches to e-cigs will have a reduced risk of lung cancer.  However, it is not at all clear that e-cigarettes will not introduce a new health risk to the person who has never smoked or whether it will be a safe alternative for the occasional smoker.
Q: Is there any evidence that it’s easier to quit smoking by shifting to e-cigarettes?
A: No, the evidence that is available suggests that e-cigarettes are not an effective smoking cessation device. The question is how difficult will it be for heavy smokers to substitute e-cigarettes for their regular cigarettes.
Q: How much nicotine from e-cigarettes is released as vapor, potentially to be inhaled by others? Does the vapor represent less of a health threat than secondhand smoke?
A: Plenty. Currently, there is very little standardization in e-cigarettes and lots of potentially harmful chemicals have been measured in it. The first study to report on this did so last December. There is no science that supports allowing e-cigarettes to be used where cigarettes are prohibited.
Image source: The Mercury News

ucsdcancer:

From our sister blog, questions with one of our experts on what’s known about e-cigarette safety. Although e-cigarettes do not have all the known carcinogens of traditional cigarettes, not enough is known to call them a “safer” alternative. Read more.

ucsdhealthsciences:

To Vape or Not to Vape?
We’ve got thee questions for our expert about the supposed safety of e-cigarettes

For the last 50 years cigarette smoking has been on the decline due in large part to aggressive advocacy by health professionals about the risks associated with smoking tobacco, and a once ubiquitous habit has become taboo. Quickly replacing tobacco cigarettes are electronic or e-cigarettes and “vaping” is the new inhaling. E-cigarette availability and popularity are at an all-time high, especially among teens and young adults, with claims of e-cigarette safety driving the trend.

But are e-cigarettes really safe? Recent reports of liquid nicotine poisoning beg to differ and much remains unknown about whether or not inhaling the vapor from e-cigarettes is safer than inhaling smoked tobacco.

We’ve asked John Pierce, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine, Moores Cancer Center director for population sciences and expert on tobacco cessation three questions about the relative safety of e-cigarettes.

Question: What, if anything, is known about the health effects of nicotine delivery from e-cigarettes versus traditional tobacco cigarettes? Are they, as advocates and tobacco companies suggest, safer?

Answer: There is no question that a heavy smoker who stops using cigarettes and switches to e-cigs will have a reduced risk of lung cancer.  However, it is not at all clear that e-cigarettes will not introduce a new health risk to the person who has never smoked or whether it will be a safe alternative for the occasional smoker.

Q: Is there any evidence that it’s easier to quit smoking by shifting to e-cigarettes?

A: No, the evidence that is available suggests that e-cigarettes are not an effective smoking cessation device. The question is how difficult will it be for heavy smokers to substitute e-cigarettes for their regular cigarettes.

Q: How much nicotine from e-cigarettes is released as vapor, potentially to be inhaled by others? Does the vapor represent less of a health threat than secondhand smoke?

A: Plenty. Currently, there is very little standardization in e-cigarettes and lots of potentially harmful chemicals have been measured in it. The first study to report on this did so last December. There is no science that supports allowing e-cigarettes to be used where cigarettes are prohibited.

Image source: The Mercury News

epistates

epistates:

femininefreak:

Sex Education in American Public Schools

This is the state of sex education in America, and it needs to change. Everyone should have access to quality sex education that includes positive, healthy relationship modeling (that is all-inclusive) and medically accurate, reliable information about contraception and abstinence. This should also include education about abortion and how to access an abortion in your state. Not enough young people are getting this information from reliable sources, and it is something we can, and need to, change.

nychealth
nychealth:

April is Alcohol Awareness Month!

 
Did You Know?
In 2011, 341 New Yorkers were killed by alcohol-related injuries.
Excessive drinking killed more than 1700 New Yorkers in 2011.
One in ten hospitalizations in NYC is alcohol-related.
Young people who drink before age 15 are 2.5 times more likely to develop problem alcohol use than those who begin drinking at age 21.
 

How much is too much?
For men, excessive drinking is defined as 5 or more drinks in a short period of time, such as 2 hours, or more than 14 drinks a week.
For women, excessive drinking is defined as 4 or more drinks in a short period of time, or more than 7 drinks per week.

 
Need help cutting back?
Visit Rethinking Drinking, Alcohol & Your Health for tips and tools you can use 
Visit 1.usa.gov/1s8sOEo to find an alcohol abuse treatment program.
Call 1-800-LIFENET for confidential information, advice, and referrals. Available 24/7.

 
Looking for more information?

Check out our resources on excessive drinking and underage drinking. Also check out our guide for teens!

nychealth:

April is Alcohol Awareness Month!

 

Did You Know?

  • In 2011, 341 New Yorkers were killed by alcohol-related injuries.
  • Excessive drinking killed more than 1700 New Yorkers in 2011.
  • One in ten hospitalizations in NYC is alcohol-related.
  • Young people who drink before age 15 are 2.5 times more likely to develop problem alcohol use than those who begin drinking at age 21.

 

How much is too much?

For men, excessive drinking is defined as 5 or more drinks in a short period of time, such as 2 hours, or more than 14 drinks a week.

For women, excessive drinking is defined as 4 or more drinks in a short period of time, or more than 7 drinks per week.

 

Need help cutting back?

Visit Rethinking Drinking, Alcohol & Your Health for tips and tools you can use

Visit 1.usa.gov/1s8sOEo to find an alcohol abuse treatment program.

Call 1-800-LIFENET for confidential information, advice, and referrals. Available 24/7.

 

Looking for more information?

Check out our resources on excessive drinking and underage drinking. Also check out our guide for teens!

unicef
unicef:

Meet Moossa, a 6 months old boy from Baghdad – and sadly, Iraq’s first victim of polio in 14 years.
“I never thought that my child could be paralyzed,” says his father, who deeply regrets not having his children vaccinated against this debilitating disease.
Since the detection of Moossa’s case, polio vaccination campaigns have begun in Iraq, Syria and Egypt to reach all children under 5. Read more in our latest blog post: http://uni.cf/1kJIAAk  

unicef:

Meet Moossa, a 6 months old boy from Baghdad – and sadly, Iraq’s first victim of polio in 14 years.

“I never thought that my child could be paralyzed,” says his father, who deeply regrets not having his children vaccinated against this debilitating disease.

Since the detection of Moossa’s case, polio vaccination campaigns have begun in Iraq, Syria and Egypt to reach all children under 5. Read more in our latest blog post: http://uni.cf/1kJIAAk  

nprglobalhealth
nprglobalhealth:

Measles At A Rock Concert Goes Viral
If you went to see the Kings of Leon concert on March 28 in Seattle, let’s hope you came home with nothing but great memories.
A young woman at that concert in Seattle has come down with measles, which can be spread for days by a person who’s infected but not yet sick. That’s bad news for the thousands of people who shared the concert hall with her, or were at the many other places she went that week.
And that’s why the Washington State Department of Health has published the unidentified woman’s schedule online.
"The reason we’re doing this is that it’s so highly contagious," says Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, who is chief of communicable disease control for Seattle and King County Public Health, which investigated the measles case. “It can stay in the air for hours after the contagious person has left. If we don’t treat these people, the chain of transmission can continue.”
The young woman became contagious on March 26, after visiting a family with measles cases that were linked to an outbreak in British Columbia. Unaware she was infected, she went to work at a bakery, filled her car up at a gas station, went to the concert, went to Pike Place Market and went out for sushi. All the while she was spreading viruses in the air.
So if you were at the Starbucks at 102 Pike Street between 11:15 a.m. and 2 p.m. on March 29 and you’re not sure if you’re immune to measles, the Washington State Department of Health wants you to see a health care professional immediately. You may be in the market for a quick shot of vaccine or immune globulin.
Continue reading.
Photo: This one’s virus-free: Matthew Followill, Nathan Followill and Caleb Followill of Kings of Leon performed in Los Angeles in December. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Radio.com)

nprglobalhealth:

Measles At A Rock Concert Goes Viral

If you went to see the Kings of Leon concert on March 28 in Seattle, let’s hope you came home with nothing but great memories.

A young woman at that concert in Seattle has come down with measles, which can be spread for days by a person who’s infected but not yet sick. That’s bad news for the thousands of people who shared the concert hall with her, or were at the many other places she went that week.

And that’s why the Washington State Department of Health has published the unidentified woman’s schedule online.

"The reason we’re doing this is that it’s so highly contagious," says Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, who is chief of communicable disease control for Seattle and King County Public Health, which investigated the measles case. “It can stay in the air for hours after the contagious person has left. If we don’t treat these people, the chain of transmission can continue.”

The young woman became contagious on March 26, after visiting a family with measles cases that were linked to an outbreak in British Columbia. Unaware she was infected, she went to work at a bakery, filled her car up at a gas station, went to the concert, went to Pike Place Market and went out for sushi. All the while she was spreading viruses in the air.

So if you were at the Starbucks at 102 Pike Street between 11:15 a.m. and 2 p.m. on March 29 and you’re not sure if you’re immune to measles, the Washington State Department of Health wants you to see a health care professional immediately. You may be in the market for a quick shot of vaccine or immune globulin.

Continue reading.

Photo: This one’s virus-free: Matthew Followill, Nathan Followill and Caleb Followill of Kings of Leon performed in Los Angeles in December. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Radio.com)

gov-info
gov-info:

CDC Gov Docs/Site: Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports
Image description: This poster explains the signs and symptoms of concussions and is available for download and printing from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.
Concussions are brain injuries caused by a blow to the head or body that causes the brain to move rapidly inside the skull. They can occur in any sport and without loss of consciousness. Even mild bumps or blows to the head can be serious. Athletes, parents, and coaches need to be able to recognize the signs that a concussion has occurred.
Athletes who have experienced a concussion must be kept from playing until their brain has completely healed, because a repeat concussion increases the likelihood of having long-term problems. Only a health professional with experience in evaluating concussions can say when it’s okay to play, and athletes need to be protected from pressure to get into the game too early.
Signs and Symptoms of Concussions
Symptoms Reported by Athlete:
Headache or “pressure in head”
Nausea or vomiting
Balance problems or dizziness
Double or blurry vision
Sensitivity to light or noise
Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
Concentration or memory problems
Confusion
Does not “feel right”
Signs observed by others:
Appears dazed or stunned
Is confused about assignment or position
Forgets sports plays
Is unsure of game, score, or opponent
Moves clumsily
Answers questions slowly
Loses consciousness (even briefly)
Shows behavior or personality changes
Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall
Can’t recall events after hit or fall
For more information especially for athletes, parents, and coaches such as printable fact sheets, posters, and a online training course, visit Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports from the Centers for Disease Control.
via usa.gov

gov-info:

CDC Gov Docs/Site: Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports

Image description: This poster explains the signs and symptoms of concussions and is available for download and printing from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.

Concussions are brain injuries caused by a blow to the head or body that causes the brain to move rapidly inside the skull. They can occur in any sport and without loss of consciousness. Even mild bumps or blows to the head can be serious. Athletes, parents, and coaches need to be able to recognize the signs that a concussion has occurred.

Athletes who have experienced a concussion must be kept from playing until their brain has completely healed, because a repeat concussion increases the likelihood of having long-term problems. Only a health professional with experience in evaluating concussions can say when it’s okay to play, and athletes need to be protected from pressure to get into the game too early.

Signs and Symptoms of Concussions

Symptoms Reported by Athlete:

  • Headache or “pressure in head”
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Balance problems or dizziness
  • Double or blurry vision
  • Sensitivity to light or noise
  • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
  • Concentration or memory problems
  • Confusion
  • Does not “feel right”

Signs observed by others:

  • Appears dazed or stunned
  • Is confused about assignment or position
  • Forgets sports plays
  • Is unsure of game, score, or opponent
  • Moves clumsily
  • Answers questions slowly
  • Loses consciousness (even briefly)
  • Shows behavior or personality changes
  • Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall
  • Can’t recall events after hit or fall

For more information especially for athletes, parents, and coaches such as printable fact sheets, posters, and a online training course, visit Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports from the Centers for Disease Control.

via usa.gov